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Edit: I rewrote my question to clarify and include the goal I would like to achieve instead.

I'm building a system where I send messages around using Akka. I'm bulding it using a number of small services. I have one shared core library where all my messages reside as case classes. These form my contract between my services.

What I would like to be able to do is the following, but I get compilation errors in pattern matching of abstract class Message:

case class Source( serviceId: String, time: String )
case class Credentials( tenantId:String, userId: String )
sealed abstract class Message( credentials:Credentials, sources: Vector[Source] )
trait FormEvent
trait MailEvent

case class FetchQuestion( questionId: String, credentials:Credentials, sources: Vector[Source] ) extends Message( credentials, sources ) with FormEvent
case class MailQuestion( questionId: String, credentials: Credentials, sources: Vector[Sources]) extends Message( credentials, sources ) with MailEvent

def route( msg:Message, tenantId: String, sources: Vector[Source] ) = msg match {
  case fe:FormEvent => s"form message for $tenantId with sources $sources."
  case me:MailEvent => s"mail message for $tenantId with sources $sources."
}

// Emulated Akka Receive, compilation error when matching.
def receive( a: Any ) = a match {
  case msg@Message( credentials, srs ) => route( msg.copy( sources = (srs :+ Source( "routing", "justnow" ) ) ), credentials.tenantId, srs) 
}

So the contract of pattern matching seems to be tightly coupled with case classes, what steps do I need to take to create a super class that behaves like a case class?


Here is the same example with extractors.

case class Source( serviceId: String, time: String )
case class Credentials( tenantId:String, userId: String )
case class Trail(credentials: Credentials, sources: Vector[Source] )
trait Message {
  def trail: Trail
}

object Message {
  def unapply( msg: Message ) = Option( msg.trail ) 
}

trait FormEvent
trait MailEvent

case class FetchQuestion( questionId: String, trail:Trail ) extends Message with FormEvent
case class MailQuestion( questionId: String, trail:Trail ) extends Message with MailEvent

def route( msg:Message, tenantId: String, newSources: Vector[Source] ) = msg match {
  case fe:FormEvent => s"form message $msg for $tenantId with sources $newSources."
  case me:MailEvent => s"mail message $msg for $tenantId with sources $newSources."
}

// Emulated Akka Receive, compilation error when matching.
def receive( a: Any ) = a match {
  case msg@Message( Trail( Credentials( tenantId, _ ), srs ) ) => route( msg, tenantId, (srs :+ Source( "routing", "justnow" ) ) ) 
}

val fq = FetchQuestion( "question1", Trail( Credentials( "tenant", "user"), Vector( Source( "service1", "before" ) ) ) )

receive( fq )
share|improve this question
    
Seems like I'm looking for extractors. Here is one tutorial: danielwestheide.com/blog/2012/11/21/… –  Magnus Jun 2 '13 at 9:37

1 Answer 1

What you're looking for are the extractors (unapply, unapplySeq).

But instead of implementing that I would recommend simplifying your design. That multiple levels of inheritance approach of yours is too confusing and I don't see any real need for it.


Getting rid of the abstract class at least made your inheritance pattern uniform. The problem with your design remains however, and it's that you optimize prematurely.

In a correct approach first you must find yourself pattern-matching on those specific cases too much and only then should you look for a solution for it, not vice-versa. Do not try to solve the problem which you don't yet face and concentrate on your actual problem. In most cases later on you'll find out that there wasn't any real need for those optimizations or your app will change so much by that time, that the whole optimization problem will become outdated. So start simple and go more complex only when you have to.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure what you mean specifically with multiple levels of inheritance? Are you referring to using more than one trait? My revised example with extractor uses only traits, having an abstract class was not by my own choice before. I have those traits to make sure that different parts of my application can deal with the general case instead of handling the most specific case everywhere when pattern matching. –  Magnus Jun 2 '13 at 10:03
    
@Magnus see the updates to my answer –  Nikita Volkov Jun 2 '13 at 10:23
    
My initial post (shortened for readability) actually stated that I thought the solution became too complex with abstract classes or traits with generics. So yes you have a point. But these are not premature optimizations. I'm splitting up services into small applications on different JVM:s. I need a uniform way to handle cross cutting concerns and easy routing to correct service with traits like FormEvent, MailEvent instead matching across 20-30 message types on several levels. –  Magnus Jun 3 '13 at 10:11
    
Just to be clear: I'm don't think you're wrong in general, just that I don't see how you can make that judgment when you haven't seen the whole application and previous versions. –  Magnus Jun 3 '13 at 10:12

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