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Want search every word in a dictionary what has the same character exactly at the second and last positon, and one times somewhere middle.

examples:

statement - has the "t" at the second, fourth and last place
severe = has "e" at 2,4,last
abbxb = "b" at 2,3,last

wrong

abab = "b" only 2 times not 3
abxxxbyyybzzzzb - "b" 4 times, not 3

my grep is not working

my @ok = grep { /^(.)(.)[^\2]+(\2)[^\2]+(\2)$/ } @wordlist;

e.g. the

perl -nle 'print if /^(.)(.)[^\2]+(\2)[^\2]+(\2)$/' < /usr/share/dict/words

prints for example the

zarabanda

what is wrong.

What should be the correct regex?

EDIT:

And how to i can capture the enclosed groups? e.g. for the

statement - want cantupre: st(a)t(emen)t - for the later use

my $w1 = $1; my w2 = $2; or something like...
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1  
[^\2] does not do what you think, the characters are literal inside character class brackets. –  TLP Jun 2 '13 at 0:21
    
Not exactly literal, the \2 represents a chr(2) a.k.a. Ctrl-B –  Wumpus Q. Wumbley Jun 2 '13 at 0:24
1  
Is this right or wrong: xxxix? –  sid_com Jun 2 '13 at 12:15
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is the regex that should work for you:

^.(.)(?=(?:.*?\1){2})(?!(?:.*?\1){3}).*?\1$

Live Demo: http://www.rubular.com/r/bEMgutE7t5

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not realy understand yet, but works - so thanx - and going to decipher it ;) –  Nemo Jun 2 '13 at 0:31
    
This regex is using positive and negative lookaheads. It just means that 2nd character should be followed by exactly 2 similar characters but not 3 or more characters. –  anubhava Jun 2 '13 at 0:33
    
It's an extension of the trick that allows /foo/ && /bar/ to be written as /^(?=.*?foo)(?=.*?bar)/. –  ikegami Jun 2 '13 at 0:41
    
Please, added one sub-question. because don't know to where put the capture () for caturing the enclosed strings. Could you help? –  jm666 Jun 2 '13 at 0:41
1  
Use (.*?)\1(.*?)\1 instead of (?:.*?\1){2} to capture the strings between the char. Or use my much more straightforward solution :) –  ikegami Jun 2 '13 at 0:43
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(?:(?!STRING).)* is STRING as [^CHAR]* is to CHAR, so what you want is:

^.             # Ignore first char
(.)            # Capture second char
(?:(?!\1).)*   # Any number of chars that aren't the second char
\1             # Second char
(?:(?!\1).)*   # Any number of chars that aren't the second char
\1\z           # Second char at the end of the string.

So you get:

perl -ne'print if /^. (.) (?:(?!\1).)* \1 (?:(?!\1).)* \1$/x' \
   /usr/share/dict/words

To capture what's in between, add parens around both (?:(?!\1).)*.

perl -nle'print "$2:$3" if /^. (.) ((?:(?!\1).)*) \1 ((?:(?!\1).)*) \1\z/x' \
   /usr/share/dict/words
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To capture what's in between, add parens around both (?:(?!\1).)*. (Updated) –  ikegami Jun 2 '13 at 0:46
    
nice, +1 thank you. ;) –  jm666 Jun 2 '13 at 0:49
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Using lookahead:

/^.(.)(?!(?:.*\1){3}).*\1(.*)\1$/

Meaning:

/^.(.)(?!(?:.*\1){3})  # capture the second character if it is not
                       # repeated more than twice after the 2nd position
.*\1(.*)\1$              # match captured char 2 times the last one at the end
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my @ok = grep {/^.(\w)/; /^.$1[^$1]*?$1[^$1]*$1$/ } @wordlist;
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1  
Interesting approach, but please get rid of those {1} pseudo-quantifiers. All they're doing is clutter up the regex. –  Alan Moore Jun 2 '13 at 1:03
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