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Using the table EMP, where MANAGER represents the employee's manager:

EMPLOYEE   MANAGER
1          NULL
2          1
3          1
4          2
5          2

How can I make a query that determines if an employee is a manager?

EMPLOYEE   STATUS
1          IS MANAGER
2          IS MANAGER
3          IS NOT MANAGER
4          IS NOT MANAGER
5          IS NOT MANAGER

Is it possible to do this without a subquery?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can JOIN the table on itself and use a CASE statement:

SELECT DISTINCT E.Employee, 
    CASE 
       WHEN M.Employee IS NOT NULL THEN 'IS MANAGER' 
       ELSE 'IS NOT MANAGER' END Status
FROM YourTable E
   LEFT JOIN YourTable M ON E.Employee = M.Manager

Use an OUTER JOIN to get all the employees and not just those that are managers.

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+1. Exactly what I was writing as your answer popped up, this is how I would solve this situation exactly. –  Ben English Jun 2 '13 at 2:23
    
I noticed that you used DISTINCT in order for this to work. Also, I was joining them reversely (E.Manager = M.Employee). Why does it work this way? Thanks. –  Christopher Markieta Jun 2 '13 at 2:31
1  
@ChristopherMarkieta -- DISTINCT is needed because of the JOIN -- without it, duplicate records could be returned. Joining the tables on E.Manager=M.Employee would only return the records where a manager exists. Glad I could help! –  sgeddes Jun 2 '13 at 2:34

Short answer is no. Given the structure you show, there's no way of showing that without a join/subquery/CTE, you could know if the person is the top of the chain with:

SELECT *
FROM EMP 
WHERE MANAGER IS NULL

But aside from that you need a join/subquery/CTE.

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To get the list of manager primary keys, just

SELECT DISTINCT
    MANAGER
FROM 
    EMP;

To get more information about each manager assuming that the table also has such things as the manager's name:

SELECT DISTINCT
    m.employee, m.given_name, m.surname
FROM
    EMP m
JOIN
    EMP e
ON
    e.manager = m.employee;

I originally left out the manager's id, but I edited it to add it just in case the organization has two managers with the same name: John Smith, say.

If you want the status message, you can use a CASE call.

SELECT
    MANAGER,
    CASE COUNT(*)
        WHEN 0 THEN "IS NOT MANAGER"
        ELSE "IS MANAGER"
    END "STATUS"
FROM
    EMP
GROUP BY
    MANAGER;
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My last suggestion is silly, as it won't show any employee id that doesn't appear in the manager column. An outer join will be necessary. –  Eric Jablow Jun 2 '13 at 3:04

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