Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a native JavaScript method to merge 2 arrays into a literal object.

Turn this:

var x = ["blue", "yellow", "red", "green", "brown", "grey", "gray", "orange"]; 
var y = ["james", "john", "robert", "michael", "william", "david", "richard", "wayne"];

Into this:

{
"obj" : {
    "blue" : "james",
    "yellow" : "john",
    "red" :  "robert", 
    "green" : "michael", 
    "brown" : "william", 
    "gray" : "david", 
    "grey" : "richard", 
    "orange" : "wayne"
  }
}
share|improve this question
1  
The arrays will always be of the same size? –  BrunoLM Jun 2 '13 at 4:01
2  
"I'm looking for..." - No, you're asking for. What have you tried so far? –  nnnnnn Jun 2 '13 at 4:03
    
@BrunoLM in theory the arrays will always be the same size unless something goes completely sideways. –  BingeBoy Jun 2 '13 at 4:23
    
@nnnnnn thanks for the link. Yes, I should have posted with source and where I was stuck. The bracket notation "obj[a[i]]" was something I completely overlooked. +1 for the good read. –  BingeBoy Jun 2 '13 at 4:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
var x = ["blue", "yellow", "red", "green", "brown", "grey", "gray", "orange"]; 
var y = ["james", "john", "robert", "michael", "william", "david", "richard", "wayne"];

function merge2array(a, b) {
    var obj = {};
    var l = a.length;
    var i;

    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        obj[a[i]] = b[i];
    }

    return obj;
}

var obj = merge2array(x, y);
console.log(obj);

This will return this object:

{
    "blue" : "james",
    "yellow" : "john",
    "red" :  "robert", 
    "green" : "michael", 
    "brown" : "william", 
    "gray" : "david", 
    "grey" : "richard", 
    "orange" : "wayne"
}

Then you can build your desired object:

var r = { obj: obj };
console.log(r);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is great. Thanks! –  BingeBoy Jun 2 '13 at 4:14

You can do this with a fairly simple loop:

var result = {obj: {}};
for (var i=0; i<x.length; i++) {
    result.obj[x[i]] = y[i];
}

This assumes that x and y are always the same length. If they're not, you just need to add a bit more code for checking the lengths.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Just like my answer, except you were quicker. –  nnnnnn Jun 2 '13 at 3:57

There isn't a native method.

Here you can find two ways of achieving it

The first method, m1, will validate the length of your arrays, if it doesn't match it will throw an exception.

function m1(keys, values)
{
    // in case the arrays have different sizes
    if (keys.length != values.length)
        throw new Error("Arrays are not of the same size");

    var result = {};
    for (var i in keys)
    {
        result[keys[i]] = values[i];
    }

    return result;
}

The second method, m2, will allow you to have more keys than values, and fill the missing values with null.

function m2(keys, values)
{
    // alternative handling for different sizes
    if (keys.length < values.length)
        throw new Error("You can't have more values than keys");

    var result = {};
    for (var i in keys)
    {
        var val = null;
        if (i < values.length)
            val = values[i];

        result[keys[i]] = val;
    }

    return result;
}

Both methods return an object, to have an object exactly as you described you will can do this:

var x = {};
x.obj = m1([1, 2, 3], ["a", "b", "c"]);

For a compact version (without validations) you can use:

function m(k,v){r={};for (i in k)r[k[i]]=v[i];return r}

Usage:

var x = { obj: m([1,2],["A","B"]) };

Change m to the desired function name.

Reference

share|improve this answer

fastest(using while--,caching length) / shortest way?

var a=['blue','yellow','red','green','brown','grey','gray','orange'],
b=['james','john','robert','michael','william','david','richard','wayne'],
c=[],d=a.length;while(d--)c[a[d]]=b[d];
var x={obj:c};

also as function (c&d are placeholder so you don't need to write var and save bytes) the name of the function can be placed infront or after 'function'...whatever

function(a,b,c,d){c=[],d=a.length;while(d--)c[a[d]]=b[d];return c}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.