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i have been reading the UUID RFC at http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc4122.txt and experimenting using the python uuid module. for ease of explanation, here is the UUID diagram lifted from the spec.

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |                          time_low                             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |       time_mid                |         time_hi_and_version   |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |clk_seq_hi_res |  clk_seq_low  |         node (0-1)            |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |                         node (2-5)                            |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

according to my reading of the spec, the smallest type-1 UUID should have time_low, time_mid, clk_seq_hi_res, clk_seq_low, and node set to all 0s, and time_hi_and_version should have bit 15 set to 1. the largest type-1 UUID should have time_low, time_mid, clk_seq_hi_res, clk_seq_low, and node set to all 1s, and time_hi_and_version set to all 1s except for bits 12, 13, and 14.

however, attempting to generate these in python fails:

>>> u = uuid.UUID("{00000000-0000-0000-0001-00000000}")
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/local/Cellar/python/2.7.4/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/uuid.py", line 134, in __init__
    raise ValueError('badly formed hexadecimal UUID string')
ValueError: badly formed hexadecimal UUID string

>>> u = uuid.UUID("{ffffffff-ffff-ffff-fff1-ffffffff}")                                                                                                                                                          
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/local/Cellar/python/2.7.4/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/uuid.py", line 134, in __init__
    raise ValueError('badly formed hexadecimal UUID string')
ValueError: badly formed hexadecimal UUID string

i assume i'm reading the spec incorrectly, but i'm at a loss.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is not with your particular values, but that you don't have enough values.

You've only provided 14 bytes' worth of data instead of 16, and that's what it's complaining about.

UUID isn't checking the requirements of a type-1 UUID at all. If it did, it wouldn't be able to work for other UUID types, which have different requirements.

Try this:

In [58]: uuid.UUID("{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000}")
Out[58]: UUID('00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000')
In [59]: uuid.UUID('{FFFFFFFF-FFFF-FFFF-FFFF-FFFFFFFFFFFF}')
Out[59]: UUID('ffffffff-ffff-ffff-ffff-ffffffffffff')

Meanwhile, you've also apparently mixed up the version and variant, and got your endianness backward. So let's start over from scratch.

according to my reading of the spec, the smallest type-1 UUID… should have time_low, time_mid, clk_seq_hi_res, clk_seq_low, and node set to all 0s

clk_seq_hi_res is an abbreviation for clock_sequence_hi_and_reserved, defined in section 4.1.2 as "The high field of the clock sequence multiplexed with the variant". The variant is defined in 4.1.1, and you want "The variant specified in this document", which sets the two most significant bits to 1 and 0, respectively. Therefore, this field cannot be all 0s, or all 1s. Since this is the most significant bits, not the least, that means that the upper nibble of octet 8 has to be one of (8, 9, a, b), not that the lower nibble has to be one of (1, 5, 9, d).

, and time_hi_and_version should have bit 15 set to 1.

No, the version number is described in 4.1.3 as the most significant 4 bits of the timestamp, and version 1 is defined as 0-0-0-1. So, bit 15 should be set to 0, and so should 14 and 13, and bit 12 should be set to 1. This means the entire top nibble of octet 6 has to be 1, not the lower nibble of octet 7.

So:

00000000-0000-1000-8000-000000000000
ffffffff-ffff-1fff-bfff-ffffffffffff

Note that the dates represented by these timestamps are a little silly. The former is midnight 15 Oct 1582, and the latter is in the 53rd century.* So, any library that did validate version-1 UUIDs might reject them.

Also, a node of all 0s is a global unicast MAC address of all 0s, and I'm not sure that's a valid IEEE-802 address. A node of all 1s is fine, because you're explicitly allowed to use a random number if you set the multicast bit.


* As various BBC documentaries and associated textbooks explain, by the 49th century, humanity will have time travel, which will force us to change all of our timestamp technology.

share|improve this answer
    
ah excellent point :) it seems like python uuid does not do any validation of the data at construction time, although you can check some post-conditions using the version property, for example. my original question still stands, however. what are the smallest and largest valid type-1 UUIDs? –  Michael Frank Jun 2 '13 at 18:17
    
Well, it does do validation—it validates that your data form a valid UUID structure. But it doesn't validate it as a type-1 UUID, because that would reject valid type-2 through -5 UUIDs. But as for your other question, let me update the answer. –  abarnert Jun 3 '13 at 0:08

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