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How is this code working i m totally puzzled....

package com.servletpack.examples;

interface check {
    public void message();
}
public class Interface {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            check t = new check() {//how????????????????
                public void message() {
                    System.out.println("Method defined in the interface");
                }
            };
            t.message();
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            System.out.println("" + ex.getMessage());
        }
    }
}
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marked as duplicate by Brian Roach, Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt, user000001, A.H., Stony Jun 2 '13 at 10:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Did you try googling it? –  BobTheBuilder Jun 2 '13 at 6:57
    
Did you try to google things and to see JAVA fundamentals? refere to this link docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/… –  Muhannad A.Alhariri Jun 2 '13 at 7:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With that syntax, you create an anonymous class, which is perfectly legal.

Internally, anonymous classes are compiled to a class of their own, called EnclosingClass$1 where the enclosing class' name precedes the $ sign. This means that the following class is being created:

class Interface$1 implements check {
     public void message() {
         System.out.println("Method defined in the interface");
     }
}

Then, the code in main compiles to internally use the newly-defined anonymous class:

check t = new Interface$1();
t.message();
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You are creating an instance (on the fly) of anonymous class that implements the interface check.

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Your interface reference can hold the object of the implementing class. You are implementing an anonymous class and assigning it to the reference of interface, which is absolutely legal in JAVA.

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It is anonymous class. Your check class is an interface. Anonymous class defines an implementation of given interface on the fly. So it saves you from creating a seperate class for Interface's implementation. This approach is only useful when you know you will never require this implementation any where else in the code.

Hope this explanation helps !!

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