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Let's say I have an array var arr = [3,4,5,6,7,9]; and I log the contents like this:

$.each(arr, function(k, v) {
  console.log(v);
}

As I log the contents I want to check if the current value is bigger than for example var limit = 5;.

If the current value is bigger than limit I want to replace/change that value to let's say the letter A and print it out as such. So my logged arr array would look like this 3,4,5,A,A,A.

I was thinking about something like this:

$.each(arr, function(k,v) {
  if (v > limit) {
    // set this specific value equal to limit
    // log changed value
  }
  console.log(v); // otherwise just log the value found
});

I tried this, but it does nothing, no errors either.

share|improve this question
    
Your code seems alright. Except for a missing closing brace. While the first code snippet is missing a closing bracket. – kirelagin Jun 2 '13 at 10:27
1  
Also note that according to your comment, you are going to print each modified value twice. – kirelagin Jun 2 '13 at 10:29
up vote 8 down vote accepted

JSFIDDLE: http://jsfiddle.net/nsgch/8/

var arr = [3,4,5,6,7,9];
var limit = 5;

$.each(arr, function(k,v) {
  if (v > limit) {
       arr[k] = 'A'; 
  }
  console.log( arr[k] ); 
});
share|improve this answer

It depends how you were doing the "set this specific value equal to limit". If you were doing;

$.each(arr, function(k,v) {
  if (v > limit) {
    v = "A";
    // log changed value
  }
  console.log(v); // otherwise just log the value found
});

You were changing only the local variable v, rather than the element arr[k]. You can either update arr[k] like in @san.chez answer, or use $.map;

var filtered = $.map(arr, function(v,k) {
  if (v > limit) {
    return "A";
  }

  return v;
});

... then filtered would be your array [1,2,4,A,A], and arr would be unchanged. Note the swapping of k and v parameters; jQuery is consistent like that /sarcasm


Note also that both of your code samples are missing the closing }.

share|improve this answer
var arr = [3,4,5,6,7,9];
arr=arr.map(function(elem){ return elem>5?"A":elem; });
arr.forEach(function(elem){
    console.log(elem);
})

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/map

share|improve this answer
    
It's worth noting that Array.prototype.map is an ES5 method, and not cross-browser; the ES5 shim can be added to ensure support for older browsers – Matt Jun 2 '13 at 10:36
    
As far as I can see, there is a compatibility info in the link I posted. And in case you have an older browser, you can download a new one for free :) – Thomas Junk Jun 2 '13 at 10:39
1  
I know there's a compatibility section in the link you posted (the shim I linked to links to that section!), but just for the drive-byers who don't click your link, it's important to note. – Matt Jun 2 '13 at 10:42

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