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I have the below code, and when I run it without the int milli = in line 20 (near the bottom), it runs just fine, however when I assign the result of the function to the variable (milli) it throws a segmentation fault. I can't see what the difference could be to cause a segfault.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<time.h>

// convert a timeval and time to milliseconds of today
int seconds_of_day(struct timeval *sec, struct tm *tim){
    long int milli_since_epoch = (sec->tv_sec * 1000)+(sec->tv_usec/100);
    return 0; // this is return 0 only for debugging
}

int main(){
    struct timeval *timeval_struct;
    time_t rawtime;
    struct tm *tm_struct;

    gettimeofday(timeval_struct, NULL);
    time(&rawtime);
    tm_struct = gmtime(&rawtime);

    int milli = seconds_of_day(timeval_struct, tm_struct);

    return(0);
}
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Your issue is that timeval_struct is never assigned. You need to do like you did with rawtime so that it's on the stack, or manually malloc memory for it and free it at the end. –  Dave Jun 2 '13 at 11:15
1  
This is silly. Your timeval_struct pointer is not initialized. –  Kerrek SB Jun 2 '13 at 11:15
1  
You can't use the value of a variable until you assign it a value. –  David Schwartz Jun 2 '13 at 11:15
    
Thanks for your help guys, I will accept the answer in a minute. –  Benjamin Kaiser Jun 2 '13 at 11:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've declared timeval_struct as a pointer, but no memory has been allocated to it. So it's pointing to undefined memory that your program doesn't own. It crashes when seconds_of_day() attempts to access the timeval struct.

You can fix this by declaring timeval_struct as an actual struct, rather than as a pointer:

int main() {
    struct timeval timeval_struct;  // Actual struct, not pointer.
    time_t rawtime;
    struct tm *tm_struct;

    gettimeofday(&timeval_struct, NULL);  // Pass address of struct.
    time(&rawtime);
    // This is OK: gmtime() returns a pointer to allocated memory.
    tm_struct = gmtime(&rawtime);

    // Pass address of allocated timeval_struct.
    // NOTE:  seconds_of_day() does not use tm_struct at all.
    int milli = seconds_of_day(&timeval_struct, tm_struct);

    return(0);
}
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Thanks for your answer, when I saw the comments I implemented this solution and it worked, and for that you can get the correct answer. –  Benjamin Kaiser Jun 2 '13 at 11:30

Where does timeval_struct point to? You didn't allocate space for that. Either use malloc, or declare a struct timeval timeval_struct; and pass its address to gettimeofday(&timeval_struct, NULL).

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Thanks for your answer, it worked but I followed Adams answer as it was more comprehensive. I have still up-voted yours. Thanks. –  Benjamin Kaiser Jun 2 '13 at 11:31
    
No hard feelings, I upvoted your question as well :-) –  Jens Jun 2 '13 at 11:32

The code crashes because timeval_struct pointer is uninitialized. You need to allocate a struct timeval to it, or use an automatic variable instead of a pointer, like this:

struct timeval timeval_struct;
...
gettimeofday(&timeval_struct, NULL);
...
int milli = seconds_of_day(&timeval_struct, tm_struct);

Demo on ideone.

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