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If possible, how can I improve the following quick sort(performance wise). Any suggestions?

void main()
    {
      quick(a,0,n-1);
    }

    void quick(int a[],int lower,int upper)
    {
       int loc;
       if(lower<upper)
       {
        loc=partition(a,lower,upper);
        quick(a,lower,loc-1);
        quick(a,loc+1,upper);

       }
    }

    /* Return type: int
      Parameters passed: Unsorted array and its lower and upper bounds */

    int partition(int a[],int lower,int upper)
    {
      int pivot,i,j,temp;
      pivot=a[lower];
      i=lower+1;
      j=upper;
      while(i<j)
        {
            while((i<upper)&&(a[i]<=pivot))
            i++;
            while((a[j]>pivot))
            j--;
            if(i<j)
                {
                    temp=a[i];
                    a[i]=a[j];
                    a[j]=temp;
                }

        }//end while

        if(pivot>a[j])
        {
             temp=a[j];
             a[j]=a[lower];
             a[lower]=temp;
        }

         return(j);

}//end partition
share|improve this question
2  
Two things that might help get better answers: Tell us what kind of data you're likely to encounter (mostly sorted, mostly unsorted, pretty much everything...). Also (although a generic answer) run a profiler and find out where the most time is wasted (although honestly I haven't done that with C code, so no idea what good profilers exist and whether they'll really help here). –  Edan Maor Nov 14 '09 at 16:48
    
Consider unsorted numbers in this case. –  bludger Nov 14 '09 at 16:58
1  
Are you certain that the performance needs improvement? Have you measured performance with a profiler and determined that this function is a performance hot spot? –  Daniel Pryden Nov 14 '09 at 17:06
    
Well, with all the respect to everyone, how do you define performance? in algorithms, CLRS says counts basic operations eg: swapping, Sipser finds complexity according to Turing Machine, now you have program and you want to make this faster I guess. Then you need to know what you should improve. Picking the pivot as Median of 5 Median will partition better. It has been proven that median of 3 or 7 is not as good as median of 5. sci.brooklyn.cuny.edu/~amotz/700-FALL09/search.pdf –  DarthVader Nov 21 '09 at 5:18
    
Take a look at the following : sorting-algorithms.com/static/QuicksortIsOptimal.pdf Quicksort is optimal. Except that using pivot of median of 5 medians, the rest should already been optimzed for you in the lower levels, by compiler. –  DarthVader Nov 21 '09 at 5:22

13 Answers 13

up vote 19 down vote accepted
+50

The quicksort algorithm is easily parallelized. If you have multiple cores to work with, you could see quite a bit of speed up. Depending on how large your data set is, it could easily provide you with more speed up than any other optimization. However, if you have only one processor or a relatively small data set, there won't be much of a speed up.

I could elaborate more if this is a possibility.

share|improve this answer
5  
+1 for suggesting something that may actually significantly improve performance. Great! –  Isak Savo Nov 17 '09 at 19:11
    
Great answer, but I dont think that s what he s looking for. and most of the divide and conquer algorithms + dynamic programming algorithms can run in parallel. –  DarthVader Nov 21 '09 at 5:24
    
Honestly, I am a bit disappointed that he never did come back to clarify what he was looking for. –  Swiss Nov 21 '09 at 8:08
    
Nowadays the answer to everything is "parallelize" or "cloud computing". –  Alexandru Nov 21 '09 at 15:05
    
I am sorry but my account got suspended for seven days.So in the mean time I was not able to do a single activity on my account.Hence the delay in reply. Because of that your answer got selected as "best" answer. –  bludger Nov 22 '09 at 17:19
  1. Choose a better pivot: eg. in median-of-three you pick 3 (random) elements and choose the pivot as the median element
  2. When length(a[]) < M (in practice choose M = 9) stop sorting. After qsort() finished apply insert sort which would take roughly M * N = O(N). This avoids many function calls close to leaf of the divide-et-impera recursion tree.
share|improve this answer
    
The comment in source code of GCC's qsort states that tricks like "median-of-three" produce no real improvement in practice :) I tend to agree with this. Unless your input is somehow specific so that it workd better with "median-of-three" selection method, that is... –  AndreyT Nov 6 '09 at 17:52
    
I think median-of-tree is just a defense against sorted arrays which are much more common that the pattern required to defeat median-of-three. On average (random ordered strings?) it doesn't provide any benefit. –  Alexandru Nov 6 '09 at 19:41
1  
Actually it has been proven that, median of 5 is better than median of 3. –  DarthVader Nov 21 '09 at 5:05
    
@unkniwn (google): a reference would be great if you know –  Alexandru Nov 21 '09 at 13:01

The first suggestion would be: replace one of the recursive calls with iteration. And I mean real iteration, not a manually implemented stack for recursion. I.e. instead of making two "new" calls to quick from quick, "recycle" your current call to quick to process one branch of recursion, and call quick recursively to process another branch.

Now, if you make sure that you always make real recursive call for the shorter partition (and use iteration for the longer one), it will guarantee that the depth of recursion will never exceed log N even in the worst case, i.e. regardless of how well you choose your median.

This all is implemented in qsort algorithm that comes with GCC standard library. Take a look at the source, it should be useful.

Roughly, a more practical implementation that follows the above suggestion might look as follows

void quick(int a[], int lower, int upper)
{
  while (lower < upper)
  {
    int loc = partition(a, lower, upper);
    if (loc - lower < upper - loc)
    { /* Lower part is shorter... */
      quick(a, lower, loc - 1); /* ...process it recursively... */
      lower = loc + 1; /* ...and process the upper part on the next iteration */
    }
    else
    { /* Upper part is shorter... */
      quick(a, loc + 1, upper); /* ...process it recursively... */
      upper = loc - 1; /* ...and process the lower part on the next iteration */
    }
  }
}

This is just a sketch of the idea, of course. Not tested. Again, take a look at GCC implementation for the same idea. They also replace the remaining recursive call with "manual" recursion, but it is not really necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry but i disagree with you, converting recursion to iteration doesnt provide any benefit at all. GCC and most of the compilers optimize recursion using symbol table and cache at the lower levels, dynamic programming. Using iteration over recursion doesnt have any benefit at all. Forgive me for this; Computer Science is based on Recursion Theory and recursive functons. –  DarthVader Nov 21 '09 at 5:27
    
@unknown: Absolutely incorrect. Apparently, you missed the point entirely. The main point of this modification is not performance (which might not improve), but the hard limit on the stack depth. The original implementation had a O(N) recursion depth in worst case. Which meant that on a bad input it would crash because of stack overflow. The implementation I suggested, again, has a guaranteed limit of log2(N) on the recursion depth. I.e. it is guaranteed, for example, that on a 32-bit platform there will never be more than 32 levels of recursion and the stack will never overflow. –  AndreyT Nov 21 '09 at 16:25
    
@unknown: Note, that the log2(N) guarantee applies regardless of how bad the input is and how bad the median choice method is. Obviously, this is very valuable and very practical benefit. Moreover, this is the most important thing everyone should think about first. The performance comes second. Your verdict about this "providing no benefit at all" is laughable at best. As for the Computer Science reference - I have no idea about the point of that completely irrelevant remark. –  AndreyT Nov 21 '09 at 16:55
    
+1, but if you're not targeting DS9K-quality compilers it may be more readable to use tail recursion for the longer subarray instead of iteration, and let the compiler optimize the tail recursion. –  dsimcha Feb 27 '10 at 22:45

Sorting small blocks (<5 elements) with a loopless algorithm may improve performance. I found only one example how to write a loopless sorting algorithm for 5 elements: http://wiki.tcl.tk/4118

The idea can be used to generate loopless sorting algorithms for 2,3,4,5 elements in C.

EDIT: i tried it on one set of data, and i measured 87% running time compared to the code in the question. Using insertion sort on <20 blocks resulted 92% on the same data set. This measurement is not representative but may show that this is a way how can You improve Your quicksort code.

EDIT: this example code write out loopless sorting functions for 2-6 elements:

#include <stdio.h>

#define OUT(i,fmt,...)  printf("%*.s"fmt"\n",i,"",##__VA_ARGS__);

#define IF( a,b, i, block1, block2 ) \
  OUT(i,"if(t[%i]>t[%i]){",a,b) block1 OUT(i,"}else{") block2 OUT(i,"}")

#define AB2(i,a,b)         IF(a,b,i,P2(i+2,b,a),P2(i+2,a,b))
#define  P2(i,a,b)         print_perm(i,2,(int[2]){a,b});

#define AB3(i,a,b,c)       IF(a,b,i,BC3(i+2,b,a,c),BC3(i+2,a,b,c))
#define AC3(i,a,b,c)       IF(a,c,i, P3(i+2,c,a,b), P3(i+2,a,c,b))
#define BC3(i,a,b,c)       IF(b,c,i,AC3(i+2,a,b,c), P3(i+2,a,b,c))
#define  P3(i,a,b,c)       print_perm(i,3,(int[3]){a,b,c});

#define AB4(i,a,b,c,d)     IF(a,b,i,CD4(i+2,b,a,c,d),CD4(i+2,a,b,c,d))
#define AC4(i,a,b,c,d)     IF(a,c,i, P4(i+2,c,a,b,d), P4(i+2,a,c,b,d))
#define BC4(i,a,b,c,d)     IF(b,c,i,AC4(i+2,a,b,c,d), P4(i+2,a,b,c,d))
#define BD4(i,a,b,c,d)     IF(b,d,i,BC4(i+2,c,d,a,b),BC4(i+2,a,b,c,d))
#define CD4(i,a,b,c,d)     IF(c,d,i,BD4(i+2,a,b,d,c),BD4(i+2,a,b,c,d))
#define  P4(i,a,b,c,d)     print_perm(i,4,(int[4]){a,b,c,d});

#define AB5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(a,b,i,CD5(i+2,b,a,c,d,e),CD5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e))
#define AC5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(a,c,i, P5(i+2,c,a,b,d,e), P5(i+2,a,c,b,d,e))
#define AE5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(a,e,i,CB5(i+2,e,a,c,b,d),CB5(i+2,a,e,c,b,d))
#define BE5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(b,e,i,AE5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e),DE5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e))
#define BD5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(b,d,i,BE5(i+2,c,d,a,b,e),BE5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e))
#define CB5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(c,b,i,DC5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e),AC5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e))
#define CD5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(c,d,i,BD5(i+2,a,b,d,c,e),BD5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e))
#define DC5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(d,c,i, P5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e), P5(i+2,a,b,d,c,e))
#define DE5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   IF(d,e,i,CB5(i+2,a,b,c,e,d),CB5(i+2,a,b,c,d,e))
#define  P5(i,a,b,c,d,e)   print_perm(i,5,(int[5]){a,b,c,d,e});

#define AB6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(a,b,i,CD6(i+2,b,a,c,d,e,f),CD6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f))
#define AC6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(a,c,i, P6(i+2,c,a,b,d,e,f), P6(i+2,a,c,b,d,e,f))
#define AE6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(a,e,i,CB6(i+2,e,a,c,b,d,f),CB6(i+2,a,e,c,b,d,f))
#define BD6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(b,d,i,DF6(i+2,c,d,a,b,e,f),DF6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f))
#define BE6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(b,e,i,AE6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f),DE6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f))
#define CB6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(c,b,i,DC6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f),AC6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f))
#define CD6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(c,d,i,EF6(i+2,a,b,d,c,e,f),EF6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f))
#define DB6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(d,b,i,BE6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f),BE6(i+2,c,d,a,b,e,f))
#define DC6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(d,c,i, P6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f), P6(i+2,a,b,d,c,e,f))
#define DE6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(d,e,i,CB6(i+2,a,b,c,e,d,f),CB6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f))
#define DF6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(d,f,i,DB6(i+2,a,b,e,f,c,d),BE6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f))
#define EF6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) IF(e,f,i,BD6(i+2,a,b,c,d,f,e),BD6(i+2,a,b,c,d,e,f))
#define  P6(i,a,b,c,d,e,f) print_perm(i,6,(int[6]){a,b,c,d,e,f});

#define SORT(ABn,n,...) \
  OUT( 0, ""); \
  OUT( 0, "inline void sort" #n "( int t[" #n "] ){" ) \
  OUT( 2, "int tmp;" ) \
  ABn( 2, __VA_ARGS__ ) \
  OUT( 0, "}" )

void print_perm( int ind, int n, int t[n] ){
  printf("%*.s", ind-1, "");
  for( int i=0; i<n; i++ )
    if( i != t[i] ){
      printf(" tmp=t[%i]; t[%i]=",i,i);
      for( int j=t[i],k; j!=i; k=j,j=t[j],t[k]=k)
        printf("t[%i]; t[%i]=",j,j);
      printf("tmp;");
    }
  printf("\n");
}

int main( void ){
  SORT( AB2, 2, 0,1 )
  SORT( AB3, 3, 0,1,2 )
  SORT( AB4, 4, 0,1,2,3 )
  SORT( AB5, 5, 0,1,2,3,4 )
  SORT( AB6, 6, 0,1,2,3,4,5 )
}
The generated code 3718 lines long:
sort2():    8
sort3():   24
sort4():   96
sort5():  512
sort6(): 3072
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the sheer size of your cojones. Love those nested #defines. –  rpj Nov 19 '09 at 2:47
    
I'd be interested to see the assembler output from the compiler. A loop-less sort can be done REALLY quickly using the conditional move instructions available on most processors. –  Goz Nov 19 '09 at 7:30
    
@Goz: see the generated code, i think it can not be compiled with conditional move instructions –  sambowry Nov 19 '09 at 8:10
    
I have printed this and showed to my (c#_is_the_best) friend. He is still searching for his jaw. Thank You sambowry :D –  beermann Nov 20 '09 at 11:31
    
@beerman: I am too - the code may well be extremely clever, but it is in terms of readability and comprehension extremely awful. –  user82238 Dec 3 '09 at 12:53

Try another sort algorithm.

Depending on your data, you may be able to trade memory for speed.

According to Wikipedia

  • Quick sort has a best case O(n log n) performance and O(1) space
  • Merge sort has a fixed O(n log n) performance and O(n) space
  • Radix sort has a fixed O(n . <number of digits>) perfomance and O(n . <number of digits>) space


Edit

Apparently your data is integers. With 2.5M integers in the range [0, 0x0fffffff], my implementation of radix-sort is about 4 times as fast as your implementation of quick-sort.

$ ./a.out
qsort time: 0.39 secs
radix time: 0.09 secs
good: 2000; evil: 0
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#define ARRAY_SIZE 2560000
#define RANDOM_NUMBER (((rand() << 16) + rand()) & 0x0fffffff)

int partition(int a[], int lower, int upper) {
  int pivot, i, j, temp;
  pivot = a[lower];
  i = lower + 1;
  j = upper;
  while (i < j) {
    while((i < upper) && (a[i] <= pivot)) i++;
    while (a[j] > pivot) j--;
    if (i < j) {
      temp = a[i];
      a[i] = a[j];
      a[j] = temp;
    }
  }
  if (pivot > a[j]) {
    temp = a[j];
    a[j] = a[lower];
    a[lower] = temp;
  }
  return j;
}

void quick(int a[], int lower, int upper) {
  int loc;
  if (lower < upper) {
    loc = partition(a, lower, upper);
    quick(a, lower, loc-1);
    quick(a, loc+1, upper);
  }
}

#define NBUCKETS 256
#define BUCKET_SIZE (48 * (1 + ARRAY_SIZE / NBUCKETS))

/* "waste" memory */
int bucket[NBUCKETS][BUCKET_SIZE];

void radix(int *a, size_t siz) {
  unsigned shift = 0;
  for (int dummy=0; dummy<4; dummy++) {
    int bcount[NBUCKETS] = {0};
    int *aa = a;
    size_t s = siz;
    while (s--) {
      unsigned v = ((unsigned)*aa >> shift) & 0xff;
      if (bcount[v] == BUCKET_SIZE) {
        fprintf(stderr, "not enough memory.\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "v == %u; bcount[v] = %d.\n", v, bcount[v]);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
      }
      bucket[v][bcount[v]++] = *aa++;
    }
    aa = a;
    for (int k=0; k<NBUCKETS; k++) {
      for (int j=0; j<bcount[k]; j++) *aa++ = bucket[k][j];
    }
    shift += 8;
  }
}

int ar1[ARRAY_SIZE];
int ar2[ARRAY_SIZE];

int main(void) {
  clock_t t0;

  srand(time(0));
  for (int k=0; k<ARRAY_SIZE; k++) ar1[k] = ar2[k] = RANDOM_NUMBER;

  t0 = clock(); while (clock() == t0) /* void */; t0 = clock();
  do {
    quick(ar1, 0, ARRAY_SIZE - 1);
  } while (0);
  double qsort_time = (double)(clock() - t0) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

  t0 = clock(); while (clock() == t0) /* void */; t0 = clock();
  do {
    radix(ar2, ARRAY_SIZE);
  } while (0);
  double radix_time = (double)(clock() - t0) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

  printf("qsort time: %.2f secs\n", qsort_time);
  printf("radix time: %.2f secs\n", radix_time);

  /* compare sorted arrays by sampling */
  int evil = 0;
  int good = 0;
  for (int chk=0; chk<2000; chk++) {
    size_t index = RANDOM_NUMBER % ARRAY_SIZE;
    if (ar1[index] == ar2[index]) good++;
    else evil++;
  }
  printf("good: %d; evil: %d\n", good, evil);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

The wikipedia article on quicksort has a bunch of ideas.

share|improve this answer
3  
...a bunch of generic theoretical ideas, but unfortunately virtually no practical ones (which is understandable, since the article has to be implementation/language independent). –  AndreyT Nov 6 '09 at 17:23
    
Actually application developers should better use framework functions for sorting. In the early days you rolled your own, but these times are over for about 99% of all use cases. Additionally, as frameworks get better and better, all users of the sort function in application code get the benefit. (Same goes for C++ code with STL instead of creating your own b-tree class etc.) –  Thorsten79 Feb 3 '10 at 12:10

completely dumb answer, but... compile your code in release mode and turn on optimizations !

share|improve this answer
  1. You can a eliminate recuriosn overhead by using QuickSort with Explicit Stack

    void quickSort(int a[], int lower, int upper)
    {
        createStack(); 
        push(lower); 
        push(upper);
    
        while (!isEmptyStack()) {
        upper=poptop();
        lower=poptop();
           while (lower<upper) {
                     pivPos=partition(selectPivot(a, size), a, lower, upper);
                     push(lower);
                     push(pivPos-1);
                     lower = pivPos+1; // end = end;
           }
       }
    }
    
  2. You can use better pivot selection technique such as:

    1. median of 3
    2. median of medians
    3. random pivot
share|improve this answer
    
Again, this approach unconditionally pushes the lower partition on the stack, while processing the upper partition iteratively. In general case, the depth of stack will be O(n) (unless you guarantee the almost-perfect median), which is not good. If you add another if that makes sure to always push the shorter partition on the stack, the stack depth will never exceed O(log n) even with the worst choice of median. –  AndreyT Nov 19 '09 at 7:30
    
Recursion doesnt have over head, actually. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_programming –  DarthVader Nov 21 '09 at 5:29
    
@ AndreyT , Thanks for suggestion :) @ unknown(google) , How DP is applicable hear? Recursion creates large number of stack frames(containing return address ,frame pointer etc...) on program stack which is obviously an overhead.Use of Explicit stack will eliminate this overhead. –  atv Nov 21 '09 at 12:34

If this is not just for learning use qsort from stdlib.h

share|improve this answer

Per your code, when sorted lenght is 10, the deepest stack looks like

#0  partition (a=0x7fff5ac42180, lower=3, upper=5) 
#1  0x000000000040062f in quick (a=0x7fff5ac42180, lower=3, upper=5) 
#2  0x0000000000400656 in quick (a=0x7fff5ac42180, lower=0, upper=5) 
#3  0x0000000000400644 in quick (a=0x7fff5ac42180, lower=0, upper=8) 
#4  0x0000000000400644 in quick (a=0x7fff5ac42180, lower=0, upper=9) 
#5  0x00000000004005c3 in main

Besides the algo itself, if we consider the system behavior such as stack activities as well, something else except normal call stack costs (push/pop) might downgrade the performance a lots, e.g. context switching if multi-task system, you know most OS are multi-task, and deeper the stack higher costs the switching, plus cache miss or cachline boundary across.

I believe in this case if the length become bigger, you'll lose when comparing to some other sorting algos.

for example, when length is up to 40, the stack may look like (may more entries than shown as below):

#0  partition (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=8, upper=9) 
#1  0x000000000040065d in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=8, upper=9)  
#2  0x0000000000400672 in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=8, upper=10) 
#3  0x0000000000400672 in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=8, upper=14) 
#4  0x0000000000400684 in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=4, upper=14) 
#5  0x0000000000400672 in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=4, upper=18) 
#6  0x0000000000400684 in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=0, upper=18) 
#7  0x0000000000400672 in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=0, upper=26) 
#8  0x0000000000400672 in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=0, upper=38) 
#9  0x0000000000400672 in quick (a=0x7fff24810cd0, lower=0, upper=39) 
#10 0x00000000004005ee in main

too deeper the stack.

Function inlining is helpful too, but it increases code footprint of the final executable. I agree with @Swiss, parallel programming might help you so much.

share|improve this answer

The first thing to do is benchmark it. And benchmark it against the standard qsort, and against the c++ std::sort and std::stable_sort.

Your results, should your data-set be big enough, will show that the std::sort is superior to qsort in all cases except those where the std::stable_sort is superior. This is because the std::sort is templated, and therefore the comparision can be inlined.

Your code inlines the comparison because its not generic. If your code is slower than qsort, you have a problem right there.

The faster sort would be to sort parts in parallel, e.g. openmp, and then merge them back together.

share|improve this answer

Copied from my answer to answer question.

Edit: This post assumes you already do obvious things like take advantage of tail recursion to get rid of the unnecessary call overhead.

People like to criticize the quicksort for poor performance with certain inputs, especially when the user has control of the input. The following approach yields performance matching midpoint selection but expected complexity exponentially approaches O(n log n) as the list grows in size. In my experience it significantly outperforms best-of-3 selection due to much less overhead in the majority case. It should perform evenly with midpoint selection for "expected" inputs, but is not vulnerable to poor inputs.

  • Initialize the quicksort with a random positive integer I. That value will be used throughout the sorting process (don't have to generate multiple numbers).
  • Pivot is selected as I mod SectionSize.

For additional performance, you should always switch your quicksort to shell sort for "small" list segments - I've seen lengths from 15-100 chosen as the cutoff.

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multithreading ?

/*
 * multiple-thread quick-sort.
 * Works fine on uniprocessor machines as well.
 */

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <thread.h>

/* don't create more threads for less than this */
#define SLICE_THRESH   4096

/* how many threads per lwp */
#define THR_PER_LWP       4

/* cast the void to a one byte quanitity and compute the offset */
#define SUB(a, n)      ((void *) (((unsigned char *) (a)) + ((n) * width)))

typedef struct {
  void    *sa_base;
  int      sa_nel;
  size_t   sa_width;
  int    (*sa_compar)(const void *, const void *);
} sort_args_t;

/* for all instances of quicksort */
static int threads_avail;

#define SWAP(a, i, j, width)
{ 
  int n; 
  unsigned char uc; 
  unsigned short us; 
  unsigned long ul; 
  unsigned long long ull; 

  if (SUB(a, i) == pivot) 
    pivot = SUB(a, j); 
  else if (SUB(a, j) == pivot) 
    pivot = SUB(a, i); 

  /* one of the more convoluted swaps I've done */ 
  switch(width) { 
  case 1: 
    uc = *((unsigned char *) SUB(a, i)); 
    *((unsigned char *) SUB(a, i)) = *((unsigned char *) SUB(a, j)); 
    *((unsigned char *) SUB(a, j)) = uc; 
    break; 
  case 2: 
    us = *((unsigned short *) SUB(a, i)); 
    *((unsigned short *) SUB(a, i)) = *((unsigned short *) SUB(a, j)); 
    *((unsigned short *) SUB(a, j)) = us; 
    break; 
  case 4: 
    ul = *((unsigned long *) SUB(a, i)); 
    *((unsigned long *) SUB(a, i)) = *((unsigned long *) SUB(a, j)); 
    *((unsigned long *) SUB(a, j)) = ul; 
    break; 
  case 8: 
    ull = *((unsigned long long *) SUB(a, i)); 
    *((unsigned long long *) SUB(a,i)) = *((unsigned long long *) SUB(a,j)); 
    *((unsigned long long *) SUB(a, j)) = ull; 
    break; 
  default: 
    for(n=0; n<width; n++) { 
      uc = ((unsigned char *) SUB(a, i))[n]; 
      ((unsigned char *) SUB(a, i))[n] = ((unsigned char *) SUB(a, j))[n]; 
      ((unsigned char *) SUB(a, j))[n] = uc; 
    } 
    break; 
  } 
}

static void *
_quicksort(void *arg)
{
  sort_args_t *sargs = (sort_args_t *) arg;
  register void *a = sargs->sa_base;
  int n = sargs->sa_nel;
  int width = sargs->sa_width;
  int (*compar)(const void *, const void *) = sargs->sa_compar;
  register int i;
  register int j;
  int z;
  int thread_count = 0;
  void *t;
  void *b[3];
  void *pivot = 0;
  sort_args_t sort_args[2];
  thread_t tid;

  /* find the pivot point */
  switch(n) {
  case 0:
  case 1:
    return 0;
  case 2:
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, 0), SUB(a, 1)) > 0) {
      SWAP(a, 0, 1, width);
    }
    return 0;
  case 3:
    /* three sort */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, 0), SUB(a, 1)) > 0) {
      SWAP(a, 0, 1, width);
    }
    /* the first two are now ordered, now order the second two */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, 2), SUB(a, 1)) < 0) {
      SWAP(a, 2, 1, width);
    }
    /* should the second be moved to the first? */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, 1), SUB(a, 0)) < 0) {
      SWAP(a, 1, 0, width);
    }
    return 0;
  default:
    if (n > 3) {
      b[0] = SUB(a, 0);
      b[1] = SUB(a, n / 2);
      b[2] = SUB(a, n - 1);
      /* three sort */
      if ((*compar)(b[0], b[1]) > 0) {
        t = b[0];
        b[0] = b[1];
        b[1] = t;
      }
      /* the first two are now ordered, now order the second two */
      if ((*compar)(b[2], b[1]) < 0) {
        t = b[1];
        b[1] = b[2];
        b[2] = t;
      }
      /* should the second be moved to the first? */
      if ((*compar)(b[1], b[0]) < 0) {
        t = b[0];
        b[0] = b[1];
        b[1] = t;
      }
      if ((*compar)(b[0], b[2]) != 0)
        if ((*compar)(b[0], b[1]) < 0)
          pivot = b[1];
        else
          pivot = b[2];
    }
    break;
  }
  if (pivot == 0)
    for(i=1; i<n; i++) {
      if (z = (*compar)(SUB(a, 0), SUB(a, i))) {
        pivot = (z > 0) ? SUB(a, 0) : SUB(a, i);
        break;
      }
    }
  if (pivot == 0)
    return;

  /* sort */
  i = 0;
  j = n - 1;
  while(i <= j) {
    while((*compar)(SUB(a, i), pivot) < 0)
      ++i;
    while((*compar)(SUB(a, j), pivot) >= 0)
      --j;
    if (i < j) {
      SWAP(a, i, j, width);
      ++i;
      --j;
    }
  }

  /* sort the sides judiciously */
  switch(i) {
  case 0:
  case 1:
    break;
  case 2:
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, 0), SUB(a, 1)) > 0) {
      SWAP(a, 0, 1, width);
    }
    break;
  case 3:
    /* three sort */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, 0), SUB(a, 1)) > 0) {
      SWAP(a, 0, 1, width);
    }
    /* the first two are now ordered, now order the second two */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, 2), SUB(a, 1)) < 0) {
      SWAP(a, 2, 1, width);
    }
    /* should the second be moved to the first? */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, 1), SUB(a, 0)) < 0) {
      SWAP(a, 1, 0, width);
    }
    break;
  default:
    sort_args[0].sa_base          = a;
    sort_args[0].sa_nel           = i;
    sort_args[0].sa_width         = width;
    sort_args[0].sa_compar        = compar;
    if ((threads_avail > 0) && (i > SLICE_THRESH)) {
      threads_avail--;
      thr_create(0, 0, _quicksort, &sort_args[0], 0, &tid);
      thread_count = 1;
    } else
      _quicksort(&sort_args[0]);
    break;
  }
  j = n - i;
  switch(j) {
  case 1:
    break;
  case 2:
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, i), SUB(a, i + 1)) > 0) {
      SWAP(a, i, i + 1, width);
    }
    break;
  case 3:
    /* three sort */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, i), SUB(a, i + 1)) > 0) {
      SWAP(a, i, i + 1, width);
    }
    /* the first two are now ordered, now order the second two */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, i + 2), SUB(a, i + 1)) < 0) {
      SWAP(a, i + 2, i + 1, width);
    }
    /* should the second be moved to the first? */
    if ((*compar)(SUB(a, i + 1), SUB(a, i)) < 0) {
      SWAP(a, i + 1, i, width);
    }
    break;
  default:
    sort_args[1].sa_base          = SUB(a, i);
    sort_args[1].sa_nel           = j;
    sort_args[1].sa_width         = width;
    sort_args[1].sa_compar        = compar;
    if ((thread_count == 0) && (threads_avail > 0) && (i > SLICE_THRESH)) {
      threads_avail--;
      thr_create(0, 0, _quicksort, &sort_args[1], 0, &tid);
      thread_count = 1;
    } else
      _quicksort(&sort_args[1]);
    break;
  }
  if (thread_count) {
    thr_join(tid, 0, 0);
    threads_avail++;
  }
  return 0;
}

void
quicksort(void *a, size_t n, size_t width,
          int (*compar)(const void *, const void *))
{
  static int ncpus = -1;
  sort_args_t sort_args;

  if (ncpus == -1) {
    ncpus = sysconf( _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN);

    /* lwp for each cpu */
    if ((ncpus > 1) && (thr_getconcurrency() < ncpus))
      thr_setconcurrency(ncpus);

    /* thread count not to exceed THR_PER_LWP per lwp */
    threads_avail = (ncpus == 1) ? 0 : (ncpus * THR_PER_LWP);
  }
  sort_args.sa_base = a;
  sort_args.sa_nel = n;
  sort_args.sa_width = width;
  sort_args.sa_compar = compar;
  (void) _quicksort(&sort_args);
}
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