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I am issuing a sed replace on a line, trying to extract a particular floating-point value, but all that appears to be matched is the right-side of the decimal

Text Line:

63.544: [GC 63.544: [DefNew: 575K->63K(576K), 0.0017902 secs]63.546: [Tenured: 1416K->1065K(1536K), 0.0492621 secs] 1922K->1065K(2112K), 0.0513331 secs]

If I issue s/^.*\([0-9]*\.[0-9]*\): \[Tenured:.*$/\1/, my output is:

.546

I'm wanting the 63.546 out of the line. Why is the very first [0-9]* not matching?

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Also match the ] before the number you want:

s/^.*]\([0-9]*\.[0-9]*\): \[Tenured:.*$/\1/

Per comment below, here is a more generic approach, matching a non-digit first:

s/^.*[^0-9]\([0-9]*\.[0-9]*\): \[Tenured:.*$/\1/
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I need to keep that context-free though, there are other JVM GC options that may/will put other data there. I may be able to select all combinations empirically. –  Xepoch Nov 6 '09 at 17:46
    
OK, then how about matching any non-digit first. See my edit. –  Jeremy Stein Nov 6 '09 at 18:33
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My feeling is that your .* at the beginning is acting greedy, so it absorbs everything up to the dot, but I could be wrong.

Don't use sed. I gave up on this. perl is a better choice (I was starting to play with it) but the solution with awk beats me. Go for that, unless you really love sed for some particular reason...

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Was thinking that too, but otherwise I'm thinking wouldn't have matched the right-side of the float? Hmmm...thanks for any help :) –  Xepoch Nov 6 '09 at 15:28
    
+1 for suggesting Perl (much nicer way to do regex stuff) and also your answer is right -- the ".*" is greedy and swallows everything up to the decimal point. –  AAT Nov 6 '09 at 16:18
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use awk instead sed. why bother creating complex regex?

$ more file
63.544: [GC 63.544: [DefNew: 575K->63K(576K), 0.0017902 secs]63.546: [Tenured: 1416K->1065K(1536K), 0.0492621 secs] 1922K->1065K(2112K), 0.0513331 secs]

$ awk -vRS="]" -F":" '$1+0==$1{print $1}' file
63.544
63.546
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yes please do that :) –  Stefano Borini Nov 6 '09 at 15:48
    
I LOVE awk. However this sed snippet is from a long list of actions in a much larger sed script that acts as a poor man's parser generator, a few things that sed can do that leaves awk wanting. –  Xepoch Nov 6 '09 at 15:52
    
"a few things that sed can do that leaves awk wanting" -- have you heard of the amazing awk assembler? –  ghostdog74 Nov 6 '09 at 15:56
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As Stefano pointed out, the pattern is performing a greedy match at the beginning of your text input.

If you can use perl, this command works to match your line on standard input:

perl -e '<STDIN> =~ m/^.*?([\d]+\.[\d]+):\s+\[Ten/ && print "$1\n";'
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That's the problem. I think that sed does not support the non-greedy. –  Stefano Borini Nov 6 '09 at 15:37
    
Good call... I just removed that solution from above. –  jheddings Nov 6 '09 at 15:39
    
Yes, sed does not support said constructs. –  Xepoch Nov 6 '09 at 15:40
    
@Xepoch did the [^\d]* help you? –  jheddings Nov 6 '09 at 15:41
    
Just tried both of your updates examples, they all produce the same output as I have above without the left-side. –  Xepoch Nov 6 '09 at 15:41
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