Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to go from something like this:

1> a = matrix(c(1,4,2,5,2,5,2,1,4,4,3,2,1,6,7,4),4)
1> a
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    2    4    1
[2,]    4    5    4    6
[3,]    2    2    3    7
[4,]    5    1    2    4

To something like this:

     [,1] [,2]
[1,]   12   15
[2,]   10   16

...without using for-loops, plyr, or otherwise without looping. Possible? I'm trying to shrink a geographic lat/long dataset from 5 arc-minutes to half-degree, and I've got an ascii grid. A little function where I specify blocksize would be great. I've got hundreds of such files, so things that allow me to do it quickly without parallelization/supercomputers would be much appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use matrix multiplication for this.

# Computation matrix:

mat <- function(n, r) {
  suppressWarnings(matrix(c(rep(1, r), rep(0, n)), n, n/r))
}

Square-matrix example, uses a matrix and its transpose on each side of a:

# Reduce a 4x4 matrix by a factor of 2:

x <- mat(4, 2)
x
##      [,1] [,2]
## [1,]    1    0
## [2,]    1    0
## [3,]    0    1
## [4,]    0    1

t(x) %*% a %*% x
##      [,1] [,2]
## [1,]   12   15
## [2,]   10   16

Non-square example:

b <- matrix(1:24, 4 ,6)
t(mat(4, 2)) %*% b %*% mat(6, 2)
##      [,1] [,2] [,3]
## [1,]   14   46   78
## [2,]   22   54   86
share|improve this answer
    
exactly the sort of thing I was looking for, thanks! my matrix isn't square, but half of it is. – generic_user Jun 2 '13 at 17:30
tapply(a, list((row(a) + 1L) %/% 2L, (col(a) + 1L) %/% 2L), sum)
#    1  2
# 1 12 15
# 2 10 16

I used 1L and 2L instead of 1 and 2 so indices remain integers (as opposed to numerics) and it should run faster that way.

share|improve this answer

I guess that might help you, but still it uses sapply which can be considered as loop-ish tool.

a <- matrix(c(1,4,2,5,2,5,2,1,4,4,3,2,1,6,7,4),4)
block.step <- 2
res <- sapply(seq(1, nrow(a), by=block.step), function(x) 
    sapply(seq(1, nrow(a), by=block.step), function(y) 
        sum(a[x:(x+block.step-1), y:(y+block.step-1)])
    )
)
res

Is it anyhow helpful ?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.