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I am pulling a third party's json response and sometimes the values of the fields are literally 'undef' or 'null'. If I try to do a print of the key and value of each object in this json, whenever there is a undef value it will throw an uninitialized value error.

Is there something I can add to the initial $json->decode to change those null/undefs to something perl can handle? Or maybe even just have it exclude the value pairs that are null/undef from being deposited into $json_text?

my $json_text = $json->decode($content);

foreach my $article(@{$json_text->{data}->{articles}}){
      while (my($k, $v) = each ($article)){
        print "$k => $v\n";
      }
}
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1  
err, decode is doing that; it is changing JSON nulls to perl undefs. just test with defined($v) –  ysth Jun 2 '13 at 21:03
    
Perl handles undef just fine. If your json actually contains a literal, quoted "undef", it's badly broken. –  innaM Jun 3 '13 at 4:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

$_ // "" will translate undef values to empty string,

my $json_text = $json->decode($content);

foreach my $article (@{$json_text->{data}->{articles}}) {
      while (my($k, $v) = map { $_ // "" } each %$article) {
        print "$k => $v\n";
      }
}
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This superfluously checks all the hash keys for definedness as well as the values. –  Borodin Jun 3 '13 at 16:32

Since you are running a version of Perl that allows each to be applied to a hash reference, you can also use the defined-or operator //.

An expression like a // b evaluates to a if a is defined, otherwise b.

You can use it like this.

my $json_text = $json->decode($content);

for my $article (@{$json_text->{data}{articles}}) {
  while (my ($k, $v) = each $article) {
    printf "%s => %s\n", $k, $v // 'null';
  }
}
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Try printf "%s => %s\n", $k || "empty", $v || "empty";

or even

$k ||= "empty";
$v ||= "empty";
print "$k => $v\n";
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4  
In v10 and later, the defined-or operator // can be used. It works like || except that it tests for definedness, not truth. This prevents you from changing the legit values 0 (number zero) or '' (the empty string). On earlier perls, $x = defined $x ? $x : "empty" or $x = "empty" unless defined $x could be used. –  amon Jun 2 '13 at 16:30

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