Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand simple directed graph interpretation like this:

graph = {1: [2], 2: [3], 3: [4, 5, 1], 4: [], 5: [4]}
#               1
#              / .
#             /   \
#            .     \
#       4--.3 ------.2
#        \  .
#         \ |
#          .5

But do not know how to interpret dict of dicts, such as:

{1: {2: 3, 3: 8, 5: -4}, 2: {4: 1, 5: 7}, 3: {2: 4}, 4: {1: 2, 3: -5}, 5: {4: 6}}

Is it weighted graph? How should I understand this kind of graphs write?

If you decide to downvote this question, please leave a link with the corresponding article in a comment.

share|improve this question
    
Where did your dictionary structure come from? Either: 1) you defined the structure yourself, and the question is moot, or 2) someone else built the structure, and failed to document what it represented. Without having produced that structure, there is no way to know how to interpret it. Closing as too localized. –  Eric Jun 2 '13 at 16:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, it's a directed graph with weighted edges. The following graph

Weighted Digraph

is represented as..

L = {'A': {'C':2, 'D':6}, 'B': {'D':8, 'A':3},
   'C': {'D':7, 'E':5}, 'D': {'E':-2}, 'E': {}}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, got it) –  I159 Jun 2 '13 at 16:10

This is a weighted edge directed graph. You can also use graphviz to visualize your particular data:

nestedg={1: {2: 3, 3: 8, 5: -4}, 
     2: {4: 1, 5: 7}, 
     3: {2: 4}, 
     4: {1: 2, 3: -5}, 
     5: {4: 6}}

with open('/tmp/graph.dot','w') as out:
    for line in ('digraph G {','size="16,16";','splines=true;'):
        out.write('{}\n'.format(line))  
    for start,d in nestedg.items():
        for end,weight in d.items():
              out.write('{} -> {} [ label="{}" ];\n'.format(start,end,weight))
    out.write('}\n')        

Which produces this graphical representation:

enter image description here

You could use something like Dijkstra's Algorithm to navigate paths through it. An example use would be for routing with certain routes having a greater 'cost':

def find_all_paths(graph, start, end, path=[]):
        path = path + [start]
        if start == end:
            return [path]
        if start not in graph:
            return []
        paths = []
        for node in graph[start]:
            if node not in path:
                newpaths = find_all_paths(graph, node, end, path)
                for newpath in newpaths:
                    paths.append(newpath)
        return paths       

def min_path(graph, start, end):
    paths=find_all_paths(graph,start,end)
    mt=10**99
    mpath=[]
    print '\tAll paths from {} to {}: {}'.format(start,end,paths)
    for path in paths:
        t=sum(graph[i][j] for i,j in zip(path,path[1::]))
        print '\t\tevaluating: {}, cost: {}'.format(path, t)
        if t<mt: 
            mt=t
            mpath=path

    e1=' '.join('{}->{}:{}'.format(i,j,graph[i][j]) for i,j in zip(mpath,mpath[1::]))
    e2=str(sum(graph[i][j] for i,j in zip(mpath,mpath[1::])))
    print 'Best path: '+e1+'   Total: '+e2+'\n'  

if __name__ == "__main__":
    nestedg={1: {2: 3, 3: 8, 5: -4}, 
         2: {4: 1, 5: 7}, 
         3: {2: 4}, 
         4: {1: 2, 3: -5}, 
         5: {4: 6}}

    min_path(nestedg,1,5)
    min_path(nestedg,1,4)
    min_path(nestedg,2,1)

Using your data, some example routes through the graph are:

    All paths from 1 to 5: [[1, 2, 5], [1, 3, 2, 5], [1, 5]]
        evaluating: [1, 2, 5], cost: 10
        evaluating: [1, 3, 2, 5], cost: 19
        evaluating: [1, 5], cost: -4
Best path: 1->5:-4   Total: -4

    All paths from 1 to 4: [[1, 2, 4], [1, 2, 5, 4], [1, 3, 2, 4], [1, 3, 2, 5, 4], [1, 5, 4]]
        evaluating: [1, 2, 4], cost: 4
        evaluating: [1, 2, 5, 4], cost: 16
        evaluating: [1, 3, 2, 4], cost: 13
        evaluating: [1, 3, 2, 5, 4], cost: 25
        evaluating: [1, 5, 4], cost: 2
Best path: 1->5:-4 5->4:6   Total: 2

    All paths from 2 to 1: [[2, 4, 1], [2, 5, 4, 1]]
        evaluating: [2, 4, 1], cost: 3
        evaluating: [2, 5, 4, 1], cost: 15
Best path: 2->4:1 4->1:2   Total: 3
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.