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I have a long task that will have a dedicated thread, say:

public static class WorkerThread extends Thread{

    @Override public void run () {
        for (int i = 1; i<=10; i++) {
            System.out.println("worker thread progress: " + i + "/10");
            try{Thread.sleep(1000);} catch (InterruptedException ignore) {}
        }

    System.out.println("the worker thread HAS FINISHED!");

    }

}

During this task, i want to listen to the commandline for user cancellation of the long task. Due to the peculiarities of System.in, the code is the following (that is if you want an interruptable console reading, you are forced to use polling):

public static class InputThread extends Thread {

    @Override public void run() {
       try{
           StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); 

           do {
                while (System.in.available()==0) { Thread.sleep(200); }

                sb.append((char)System.in.read());

           } while (!sb.toString().equals("cancel\n"));

           System.out.println("the user-input thread HAS FINISHED!");

       } catch (IOException ignored) {} catch (InterruptedException ie) {}
    }

}

Ok, now let's use the two threads. The cases are:

  • WorkerThread finishes before of InputThread. In this case i have to (gracefully) interrupt the InputThread, because there is no more the possibility for the user to cancel the thread
  • InputThread finishes before of WorkerThread. The user has entered "cancel" command and so i have to (gracefully) interrupt the WorkerThread

By gracefully i mean that the code must be interruptable of course, but this is not the point of the question. The question is: after i have started the two threads, how do i wait for "the first one to finish"?

public static void main (String [] args) throws InterruptedException {

    InputThread it = new InputThread();

    it.start();

    WorkerThread wt = new WorkerThread();

    wt.start();


}
share|improve this question
    
What is your main class name ? –  System.exit Jun 2 '13 at 16:48
    
T04, is it relevant? –  AgostinoX Jun 2 '13 at 17:39
    
No, just to answer clearly and show my answer. –  System.exit Jun 2 '13 at 17:54
    
I edit my answer, so now it should be compatible with your code. Check it out @AgostinoX. –  System.exit Jun 2 '13 at 17:59

5 Answers 5

The technique of choice for your use case is the CountdownLatch. Both threads must call countdown as the last thing they do and on the main thread you call await.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 ok, the most interesting solution. i'm trying to implement and eventually post any comment –  AgostinoX Jun 2 '13 at 18:22

You can use two threads with an ExecutorService and interrupts for communication:

private static class Worker implements Runnable {

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
            System.out.println("worker thread progress: " + i + "/10");
            try {
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                System.out.println("We have been cancelled");
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

private static class Monitor implements Runnable {

    private final Future<?> workerFuture;

    public Monitor(Future<?> workerFuture) {
        this.workerFuture = workerFuture;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        try (final BufferedReader br =
                new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in))) {
            while (true) {
                if (br.ready()
                        && "cancel".equals(br.readLine())) {
                    System.out.println("Input is cancel, kill worker.");
                    workerFuture.cancel(true);
                    return;
                }
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(100);
                } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                    System.out.println("Mointor cancelled. Stop.");
                    return;
                }
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    final ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
    final Future<?> longTask = executorService.submit(new Worker());
    final Future<?> monitor = executorService.submit(new Monitor(longTask));
    //wait for long task to complete
    try {
        longTask.get();
        monitor.cancel(true);
        System.out.println("Main task finished normally.");
    } catch (CancellationException ex) {
        System.out.println("Main task killed.");
    }
    executorService.shutdown();
    executorService.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.DAYS);
}

The Worker works interruptedly and exits when done or interrupted.

The Monitor reads interruptedly, if it reads "cancel" is asks the ExecutorService to interrupt the Worker via its Future.

The main thread waits for the Worker to be done via its Future and asks the ExecutorService to kill the Monitor if the Worker finishes normally.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Ok very interesting architecture, to let the Monitor hold a reference to the Worker, but not the way back. It seems to decouple well the user-interface (the Monitor) by the underlying Worker. There is just one thing: I wonder what does the Executor service add to this design replacing interrupt with cancel :-) –  AgostinoX Jun 2 '13 at 18:21
    
@AgostinoX the ExecutorService is the accepted way of handling Threads. It deals with exception handling and provides a nice way to interrupt tasks and detect when they have finished. –  Boris the Spider Jun 2 '13 at 19:02

One way of doing this is by using ExecutorService and then track the status of Futures of both runnables. Here's a small example:

ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2); // InputThread and WorkerThread
try {
    Future<?> workerFuture = es.submit(workerThread);
    Future<?> inputFuture = es.submit(inputThread);

    while(!inputFuture.isDone() && !workerFuture.isDone()) {
        // Sleep and check status again until one of the thread is complete
    }

    if(inputFuture.isDone()) { // User inputs "cancel", so cancel worker thread
        workerFuture.cancel();
    } else { // Worker thread is complete, cancel the input thread
        inputFuture.cancel();
    }

} finally {
    es.shutdown();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 ok, this should work.what I actually don't like is the idea of introducing a whole new framework that is the ExecutorService (even if it is standard and provided) just to end up polling threads. i could as well had added a synchronized boolean property "done" to both of my classes and test it in a loop in the very same way. We could even say that the solution here is the polling loop, not something provided by ExecutorService and by no one else –  AgostinoX Jun 2 '13 at 18:21

Make your polling with a loop (assuming that your class is T04):

public static void main (String [] args) throws InterruptedException {  

    InputThread it = new InputThread();
    it.start();

    WorkerThread wt = new WorkerThread();
    wt.start();

    while(true) {           //I think this works as polling
       if(it.isFinished()) {
           wt.finish();
           return;
       } 
       else if(wt.isFinished()) {
           it.finish();
           return;
       }
       try{Thread.sleep(50);} catch (InterruptedException ignore) {}
    }
}

And add a this code to your InputThread class(you can do a superclass to reuse your code):

public class InputThread extends Thread {
private boolean finished = false;

@Override 
public void run() {
   try{
       StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); 

       do {
            while (!this.finished && System.in.available()==0) { Thread.sleep(200); }

            if(this.finished) 
                return;
            else
                sb.append((char)System.in.read());

       } while (!sb.toString().equals("cancel\n") && !this.finished);                   

       System.out.println("the user-input thread HAS FINISHED!");

       this.finished = true;

   } catch (IOException ignored) {} catch (InterruptedException ie) {}
}

public boolean isFinished() {
    return this.finished;
}

public void finish(){
    this.finished = true;
}

}

And your WorkerThread may looks like:

public class WorkerThread extends Thread{
public boolean finished = false;

@Override 
public void run () {
    for (int i = 1; i<=10; i++) {
        if(this.finished)
            return;
        System.out.println("worker thread progress: " + i + "/10");
        try{Thread.sleep(1000);} catch (InterruptedException ignore) {}
    }

    System.out.println("the worker thread HAS FINISHED!");
    this.finished = true;
}

public boolean isFinished() {
    return this.finished;
}

public void finish(){
    this.finished = true;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Mmmm. Non volatile non synchronized shared variable. Good stuff. -1. –  Boris the Spider Jun 2 '13 at 17:28
    
Sorry, I added volatile modifier to finished. –  System.exit Jun 2 '13 at 17:53
    
Actually @BoristheSpider , the finished attribute doesn't need to have any explicit synchronized property because it have a implicit lock, acording to the Java Tutorials: You might wonder what happens when a static synchronized method is invoked, since a static method is associated with a class, not an object. In this case, the thread acquires the intrinsic lock for the Class object associated with the class. Thus access to class's static fields is controlled by a lock that's distinct from the lock for any instance of the class. –  System.exit Jun 2 '13 at 18:06
    
+1 ok, i liked the idea of not introducing executorservices but trying to do with what is already given, since it seems that executor adds a more elegant way to interrupt, to manage, but not to "signal" each other things. It should absolutely use a field and not a static field, that is feasible as well, it just need to pass the reference to the main to be notified back. but here what it misses is the waiting code! –  AgostinoX Jun 2 '13 at 18:19
    
So actually, do you need to 'signal' the main thread that a WorkerThread or an InputThread finished ? Is that what you want? –  System.exit Jun 2 '13 at 18:37

To answer your question: Thread.join() makes the current thread wait for the referenced thread to finish - so use that in the main method.

Also, if you're planning on using Thread.interrupt() for interrupting you will also need a status-check (!isInterrupted()) in (at least) the outer loops - only catching InterruptedException is not enough as that will only be thrown if it's currently waiting at the sleep() - it might get interrupted at another point as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Pescis, i cannot do something like wt.join() because it would block until "wt" thread is finished, even if the other has already finished, that is the user has cancelled the long task. The same way, i cannot do it.join(), this being "more complex" of a simple waiting is the point of this question. –  AgostinoX Jun 2 '13 at 16:38

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