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I'm trying to divide polynomials in the GF(2) field. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finite_field_arithmetic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GF(2)

It seems like I have the entire division sequence going well, the problem that I'm very stuck on is that it just keeps going well past the point where it should have stopped. The XOR is for subtraction and if you check the variable b should hold the right remainder value at some point but then it just keeps going.

class binary1polynomials:
    #binary arithemtic on polynomials
    def __init__(self,expr):
        self.expr = expr
    def degree(self):
        return len(self.expr)
    def id(self):
        return [self.expr[i]%2 for i in range(len(self.expr))]
    def listToInt(self):
        #return int(reduce(lambda x,y: x+str(y), self.expr, ''))
        result = binary1polynomials.id(self)
        return int(''.join(map(str,result)))
    def divide(a,b): #a,b are lists like (1,0,1,0,0,1,....)
        a = binary1polynomials.listToInt(a); b = binary1polynomials.listToInt(b)
        print "a,b,type(a)  ",a,b,type(a)
        bina = int(str(a),2); binb = int(str(b),2)
        a = min(bina,binb); b = max(bina,binb);
        print "a,b  ",a,b
        g = []; bitsa = "{0:b}".format(a); bitsb = "{0:b}".format(b)
        difflen = len(str(bitsb)) - len(str(bitsa))
        print "difflen,bitsa,bitsb,type(bitsa)  ",difflen,bitsa,bitsb,type(bitsa)
        print "a,b  ",a,b
        c = a<<difflen
        print "a,b,c  ",a,b,c
        #for bit in range(difflen):
        #for i,bit in enumerate(bitsa): #'bitsa' must be an integer base 2 before passing in
        while difflen > 0 or b != 0:
            print "A.  b,c  ",bin(b),bin(c)
            b = b^c #,a*int(bitsa[bit])
            lendif = abs(len(str(bin(b))) - len(str(bin(c))))
            c = c>>lendif
            difflen = difflen - 1
            print "B.  b,c,lendif  ",bin(b),bin(c),lendif#,int(bitsa[bit])
        z = "{0:b}".format(b)
        return z


j = (1,1,1,1);h = (1,1,0,1);k = (1,0,1,1,0);t1 = (1,1,1); t2 = (1,0,1)
t3 = (1,1); t4 = (1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1)
a = binary1polynomials(j);b = binary1polynomials(h);c = binary1polynomials(k)
f1 = binary1polynomials(t1); f2 = binary1polynomials(t2)
f3 = binary1polynomials(t3); f4 = binary1polynomials(t4)
print "divide: ",binary1polynomials.divide(f1,b)
print "divide: ",binary1polynomials.divide(f4,a)
print "divide: ",binary1polynomials.divide(f4,f2)
print "divide: ",binary1polynomials.divide(f2,a)

From this OUTPUT, it appears to get the right answer at some point (every time) but then just goes right past it.

*** Remote Interpreter Reinitialized  ***
>>> 
divide:  a,b,type(a)   111 1101 <type 'int'>
a,b   7 13
difflen,bitsa,bitsb,type(bitsa)   1 111 1101 <type 'str'>
a,b   7 13
a,b,c   7 13 14
A.  b,c   0b1101 0b1110
B.  b,c,lendif   0b11 0b11 2
A.  b,c   0b11 0b11
B.  b,c,lendif   0b0 0b1 1
g   []
0
divide:  a,b,type(a)   1011111 1111 <type 'int'>
a,b   15 95
difflen,bitsa,bitsb,type(bitsa)   3 1111 1011111 <type 'str'>
a,b   15 95
a,b,c   15 95 120
A.  b,c   0b1011111 0b1111000
B.  b,c,lendif   0b100111 0b111100 1
A.  b,c   0b100111 0b111100
B.  b,c,lendif   0b11011 0b11110 1
A.  b,c   0b11011 0b11110
B.  b,c,lendif   0b101 0b111 2
A.  b,c   0b101 0b111
B.  b,c,lendif   0b10 0b11 1
A.  b,c   0b10 0b11
B.  b,c,lendif   0b1 0b1 1
A.  b,c   0b1 0b1
B.  b,c,lendif   0b0 0b1 0
g   []
0
divide:  a,b,type(a)   1011111 101 <type 'int'>
a,b   5 95
difflen,bitsa,bitsb,type(bitsa)   4 101 1011111 <type 'str'>
a,b   5 95
a,b,c   5 95 80
A.  b,c   0b1011111 0b1010000
B.  b,c,lendif   0b1111 0b1010 3
A.  b,c   0b1111 0b1010
B.  b,c,lendif   0b101 0b101 1
A.  b,c   0b101 0b101
B.  b,c,lendif   0b0 0b1 2
A.  b,c   0b0 0b1
B.  b,c,lendif   0b1 0b1 0
A.  b,c   0b1 0b1
B.  b,c,lendif   0b0 0b1 0
g   []
0
divide:  a,b,type(a)   101 1111 <type 'int'>
a,b   5 15
difflen,bitsa,bitsb,type(bitsa)   1 101 1111 <type 'str'>
a,b   5 15
a,b,c   5 15 10
A.  b,c   0b1111 0b1010
B.  b,c,lendif   0b101 0b101 1
A.  b,c   0b101 0b101
B.  b,c,lendif   0b0 0b1 2
g   []
0

It might be some simple mistake I'm making as I'm teaching myself Python right now.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There seem to be a few mistakes with this part of the code:

while difflen > 0 or b != 0:
        b = b^c 
        lendif = abs(len(str(bin(b))) - len(str(bin(c))))
        c = c>>lendif
        difflen = difflen - 1

You appear to be dividing b by a, where c is equal to a shifted left in order for the most significant bits to be in the same location.

Problem 1

This loop never terminates while b is nonzero => when it terminates the answer b is always zero.

Fix:

 while difflen > 0 and b != 0:

Problem 2

If you remove multiple bits in a single iteration, lendif>1 and c may be shifted right more bits than it was shifted left.

Fix:

  difflen -= lendif

Problem 3

You are not performing the final iteration. The code is computing the modulus of a polynomial with respect to another, so divide(101,101) should be 0. (A better name for the function might be modulus rather than divide as you are returning the remainder not the quotient). Your code currently finds difflen=0, so skips the while loop.

Fix:

  while difflen >= 0 and b != 0:

Final code

while difflen >= 0 and b != 0:
        b = b^c 
        lendif = abs(len(str(bin(b))) - len(str(bin(c))))
        c = c>>lendif
        difflen -= lendif
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! that's brilliant @peter. yes, it's just modulus remainder now unfortunately. how would you find the quotient? – stackuser Jun 2 '13 at 19:13
1  
I think you might get the quotient if you set q=0, and then q+=1<<difflen in your loop. – Peter de Rivaz Jun 2 '13 at 19:18
    
you're a genius again! i wasn't sure how to get the 0's in there but that solved it. i've +1 upvoted you as many times as i'm allowed but maybe others will happen along and see the value of your post. – stackuser Jun 2 '13 at 20:12

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