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I have to create a procedure that receives two arguments: (on stack):

  • a offest of a string - a byte array.

  • The string's length.

I have to create a local variable, and copy the string to the variables.

Then I'm trying to print it. it doesn't work.

.model small
.stack 64

.data
str1 db "Hello world$"
len  dw $-str1

.code

print proc
    push bp ; save bp
    mov bp, sp
    mov cx, [bp+4]
    mov di, [bp+2]
    mov ah, 02
do1:
    mov dl, ss:[si]
    int 21H
    inc si
loop do1
    pop bp
    ret 4
endp print

cpy proc
   mov bp, sp
   mov si, [bp+2] ; string's offset
   mov cx, [bp+4] ; string's length
   sub sp, cx     ; create cx'th byte array
   mov di, sp
do:
   mov ax, [si]
   mov [di], ax
   inc si
   inc di
loop do
  add sp, [bp+4] ; restore stack
  ; print

  push len
  push sp
  call print

  ret 4
endp cpy

start:
    mov ax, @DATA
    mov ds, ax

    push len
    push offset str1
    call cpy

    mov al, 0
    mov ah, 4ch
    int 21H
end start

It prints some "random" values. do you have any idea why?

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3 Answers 3

In your copy procedure you are not looping, You are only copying the first byte of the string.

Also you are copying with 2 bytes here:

mov ax, [si]
mov [di], ax

should be:

mov al, [si]
mov [di], al
cmp al, 0
je finished
inc si
inc di
jmp loop
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print proc
    push bp ; save bp
    mov bp, sp
    mov cx, [bp+4]
    mov di, [bp+2]

Having pushed bp, your first (last pushed) parameter is at [bp + 4]. [bp + 2] is your return address... which accounts for the random characters...

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Might be easier for you to start small before you go big

Then you can debug as you build up the routine

.data
str1 db "Hello world$"
.data1

mov si,data        ;stringstart
mov cx,data1-data  ;stringlength

do:
   mov al, [si]
   mov [di], al
   inc si
   inc di
loop do

Print it out before getting more complicated, then once you know it can print out, build it up to a full stack function a stage at a time

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