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I have a large list:

X= [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17]

that I want to transpose into smaller lists: (x1- x5 are placeholders for remapping the data in X, for X=17, the length of the smaller lists is all that matters)

x1 = [0, 1], 
x2 = [0, 1, 2, 3] 
x3 = [0, 1, 2, 3] 
x4 = [0, 1, 2, 3]
x5 = [0, 1]

EXPECTED RESULT: To map the data in the large list into x1-x5 like this:

x1 = [0, 5]
x2 = [1, 6, 10, 13] 
x3 = [2, 7, 11, 14] 
x4 = [3, 8, 12, 15]
x5 = [4, 9]

I tried working my way backwards by appending the smaller lists into a large list s and transposing them into t like so:

s = [[0, 1], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1]]
t=map(None,*s) 
[(0, 0, 0, 0, 0), (1, 1, 1, 1, 1), (None, 2, 2, 2, None), (None, 3, 3, 3, None)]

This is where I got stuck. Any help here would be appreciated. I'm sure there's a simpler way to do this without appending, and remapping x into t, and breaking t into x1 -x5. Thanks you.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand your question - what does x2 = [0, 1, 2, 3] represent? –  Eric Jun 2 '13 at 18:15
    
Are you trying to just create a function for this one special structure, or do you need to have the function take x1..x5 as input and fill them based on the contents? Does it need to handle cases where you have more than five of these lists? Does it need to handle arbitrary column numbers? –  Vaughn Cato Jun 2 '13 at 18:16
    
What happens if sum(len(part) for part in (x1, x2, x3, x4, x5)) != len(x)? –  Eric Jun 2 '13 at 18:18
    
yes, the size and amount of x(n) can vary depending on the size of the large list X. However, I've defined x(n) as placeholders for remapping the data from X. –  user2444869 Jun 2 '13 at 18:34

2 Answers 2

Treating everything as 2d array works:

def transpose_into(x, splits):
    max_col = max(splits)
    res = [[None] * split for split in splits]
    col = 0
    xiter = iter(x)
    while True:
        for sub_list in res:
            try:
                sub_list[col]
                sub_list[col] = next(xiter)
            except IndexError:
                continue
        col += 1
        if col > max_col:
            break
    return res
assert transpose_into(x, splits) == [[0, 5], [1, 6, 10, 13], [2, 7, 11, 14], 
                                     [3, 8, 12, 15], [4, 9]]
share|improve this answer

Here's a slightly odd solution:

import itertools

def transpose_into(data, sizes):
    parts = [([], size) for size in sizes]

    # build a cycling iterator over the resultant lists
    iterparts = itertools.cycle(parts)

    for value in data:
        # Iterate at most once through the cycle
        for group, size in itertools.islice(iterparts, len(parts)):
            # put our value in the list if it's not full
            if len(group) < size:
                group.append(value)
                break
        else:
            # completed cycle, all lists full - stop
            break

    return [group for group, size in parts]
>>> x = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17]
>>> splits = [2, 4, 4, 4, 2]
>>> transpose_into(x, splits)
[[0, 5], [1, 6, 10, 13], [2, 7, 11, 14], [3, 8, 12, 15], [4, 9]]
share|improve this answer
    
yes, x1-x5 are just placeholders I made up for mapping the data into. Its the transpose_into() function that I'm looking for –  user2444869 Jun 2 '13 at 18:31
    
@user2444869: See my update –  Eric Jun 2 '13 at 18:48
    
wow, thanks! thats what I wanted –  user2444869 Jun 2 '13 at 19:02

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