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I have a property defined as...

public List<Obj> Objs { get; set; }

What I would like to be able to do is to put some logic into the get method, so it would look something like...

public List<Obj> Objs
{
    get
    {
        if (Objs == null)
        {
            Objs = new List<Obj>();
        }
        if (Objs.Count < 1)
        {
            Objs.Add(new Obj());
        }
        return Objs;
    }
    set { Objs = value; }
} 

Now when I do this I get an error telling me that the Function is recursive on all paths.

Is there a way to do this without creating a private backing field?

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1  
Don't do that. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182327.aspx –  SLaks Jun 2 '13 at 18:26
1  
Why can't you do it with a backing field? –  Default Jun 2 '13 at 18:27
    
It's incredible how creative people are when it comes to abusing a system they are working with. And lucky for you the compiler was smart enough to know you're trying to abuse the system, otherwise the question would have been "why is my app hanging" –  Sten Petrov Jun 2 '13 at 18:29
5  
Even if you fix this using a backing field, you shouldn't do it. You should always design a property so that after thing.Property = x; then thing.Property == x; is true. –  Matthew Watson Jun 2 '13 at 18:39
1  
@jdavis Such validation would be done by throwing an exception if you try to set a property to an out-of-range value. Otherwise, you can simply use a method instead of a property to set the value. That way you can provide encapsulation without violating the proper use of properties. –  Matthew Watson Jun 3 '13 at 6:02
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6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have to make a private field:

    private List<Obj> _objs;
    public List<Obj> Objs
    {
        get
        {
            if (_objs== null)
            {
                _objs= new List<Obj>();
            }
            if (_objs.Count < 1)
            {
                _objs.Add(new Obj());
            }
            return _objs;
        }
        set { _objs= value; }
    } 

Why is it impossible? Lets make the same thing in Java:

    private List<Obj> objs;
    public List<Obj> getListObjs()
    {
        ...
        // Recursion
        return getListObjs();
    }
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No way to do this. –  Roman Bats Jun 2 '13 at 18:28
    
why create an example in java (by the way, it looks like valid C# code to me)? Wouldn't the same logic be applicable in C#? –  Default Jun 2 '13 at 18:38
    
The getter/setter shorthands in C# are not something you see in a lot of languages so some beginners might not understand why recursion occurs. Therefore I felt like it would be interesting to show what it actually does in a more standard way to write a getter. –  Jean-Philippe Leclerc Jun 2 '13 at 18:47
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No there's no way of doing it without a backing field. Unrelated to the question but related to the situation. You should in general not expose a setter for a collection but only a getter. If you have a setter you are very often exposing internal state of the object, that should be kept hidden.

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Your property refers to itself in the definition of the get part of the property. This is illegal as it would cause the getter to end up in an endless loop. You either have a auto-implemented property (your first example), or a property with a backing field (which is automatically generated by the compiler for auto-implemented properties). You need to add a (preferrably private) field as a backing store for your property:

private List<Obj> objs;

public List<Obj> Objs
{
    get
    {
        if (objs == null)
        {
            objs = new List<Obj>();
        }
        if (objs.Count < 1)
        {
            objs.Add(new Obj());
        }
        return objs;
    }
    set { objs = value; }
} 
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you should use private field to store List of Objs. You can't get data from get method of get method... :) is recursion.

private List<Obj> _objs;
public List<Obj> Objs
{
    get { 
    if (_objs== null)
    {
        _objs = new List<Obj>();
    }
    if (_objs.Count < 1)
    {
        _objs.Add(new Obj());
    }
    return _objs;
 }
    set { _objs= value; }
}
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No, not really.

In your code, when you check for if (Objs == null) - you are effectively using the get method in which you are currently in. So Objs { get; } calls itself, and that's why it's always recursive.

Remember that auto properties (get; set;) is really just a shorthand for having a backing field and separate get and set methods. Without that magic, your code would look like this:

private List<Obj> _objs;
public List<Obj> GetObjs() { return _objs; }
public void SetObjs(List<Objs> objs) { _objs = objs; }

What you are really implementing in your post is this - notice how GetObjs() is calling itself multiple times. So for every time it calls itself, it will eventually lead to it calling itself again. And again, and again.:

public List<Obj> GetObjs() {
    if (GetObjs() == null)
    {
        SetObjs(new List<Obj>());
    }
    if (GetObjs().Count < 1)
    {
        GetObjs().Add(new Obj());
    }
    return GetObjs();
}
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private List<Obj> objs = new List<Obj>() { new Obj() };
public  List<Obj> Objs { get { return objs; } }

or if you want to protect from someone removing the last Obj

private List<Obj> objs = new List<Obj>();
public List<Obj> Objs 
{ 
   get 
   { 
       if (objs.Count == 0) objs.Add(new Obj());
       return objs; 
   } 
}

What would be the purpose of a public set?

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