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I am just starting out with Scala, and working on some tutorials. I came across companion object, and using them as factory. I tried several things out. However I am not getting the following to work properly. Cant get my head around it..

import math._

abstract class Point{
  // ...
}
object Point{
  private class PointInt(val x:Int,val y:Int) extends Point{
    def +(that:PointInt) = new PointInt(this.x + that.x, this.y + that.y)
    def distance(that:PointInt) = 
      sqrt(pow((this.x - that.x), 2) + pow((this.y - that.y), 2))
  }
  private class PointDouble(val x:Double,val y:Double) extends Point{
    def +(that:PointDouble) = new PointDouble(this.x + that.x, this.y + that.y)
    def distance(that:PointDouble) = 
      sqrt(pow((this.x - that.x), 2) + pow((this.y - that.y), 2))
  }
  def apply(x:Int,y:Int):Point = new PointInt(x,y)
  def apply(x:Double,y:Double):Point = new PointDouble(x,y)
}

val a = Point(1,2)
val b = Point(3,4)
val c = a+b // does not work... 

Just trying to add up two integer Points, like I defined it in the methods... Does anyone know what I am doing wrong??

EDIT: I was was trying to wrap the following (working) class in an Factory.

class Point(val x:Int,val y:Int){
  def +(that:Point) = new Point(this.x + that.x, this.y + that.y)
  def distance(that:Point) = sqrt(pow((this.x - that.x),2) + pow((this.y - that.y),2))

}

val a = new Point(1,2)              //> a  : week1.OU2.Point = week1.OU2$Point@73e48fa7
val b = new Point(3,4)              //> b  : week1.OU2.Point = week1.OU2$Point@677bb8fe
val c = a+b                         //> c  : week1.OU2.Point = week1.OU2$Point@6bae60c5
c.x                                 //> res0: Int = 4
c.y                                 //> res1: Int = 6
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3  
Where would a get a + method from? All it knows is that it is of type Point. It doesn't know it's actually a PointInt--that's what the return type of Point means! Did you mean to add a + method to Point? –  Rex Kerr Jun 2 '13 at 19:23
1  
In addition to Rex's comments, the + method would need to take a Point, not a subclass of Point if you wanted to pass a PointInt to a PointDouble. –  Boris the Spider Jun 2 '13 at 19:28
    
Hi Rex, Shouldnt the apply method give a an PointInt object? –  Kevinw1983 Jun 2 '13 at 19:42
2  
If you annotate the method with a return type, def apply(...): Point = then that's the type visible from the call site, even if the value returned is actually a sub type of Point. The call site doesn't "see" beyond the : Point =, so has no clue that you have a PointInt with a + method. –  0__ Jun 2 '13 at 20:12
    
Ahh, That makes totally sense. So the applies should be changed to: def apply(x:Int,y:Int):PointInt = new PointInt(x,y); def apply(x:Double,y:Double):PointDouble = new PointDouble(x,y)? This works! –  Kevinw1983 Jun 2 '13 at 21:00

1 Answer 1

I am not quite sure which constraints are actually imposed on you, for example, which classes should/must be private, but using F-bounded polymorphism might be a stepping stone to your desired solution.

/* Simplified interface (adding sqrt is straight-forward) */

abstract class Point[P <: Point[P]] {
  def +(that: P): P
}

/* Two implementations */

class PointInt(val x:Int,val y:Int) extends Point[PointInt] {
  def +(that:PointInt) = new PointInt(this.x + that.x, this.y + that.y)
}

class PointDouble(val x:Double,val y:Double) extends Point[PointDouble] {
  def +(that:PointDouble) = new PointDouble(this.x + that.x, this.y + that.y)
}

/* Companion object */

object Point {
  def apply(x:Int,y:Int) = new PointInt(x,y)
  def apply(x:Double,y:Double) = new PointDouble(x,y)
}

/* Use cases */

val a = Point(1,2)
val b = Point(3,4)
val c = a+b // ok
val d = Point(1.0, 2.5)
val e = c+d // error: type mismatch

Notice, however, that this won't help you in case you want to hide your implementations, i.e., make them private and declare public interfaces using the generic Point only - as others pointed out already.

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