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I'm new to Ruby on Rails, maybe someone can help me.

I have an association, I was wondering if I need a controller to save data into the database table?

I have user.rb model

has_many :businesses

I have business.rb model

belongs_to :user

I have this in the business migration file

class CreateBusinesses < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :businesses do |t|
      t.integer :user_id
      t.string :name
      t.string :street
      t.string :state
      t.string :city
      t.integer :zip

      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

I'm wondering if I need to create a controller file to save data into business table?

I have something like this in views/users/profile.html.erb page

<%= form_for(@user) do |f| %>
  <div class="field">
    <%= f.label :company_name %>
    <%= f.text_field :company_name %>
  </div>
  <div class="actions">
    <%= f.submit %>
  </div>
<% end %>

How do I set this form so that I can save my :company_name into business's table :name as well, and so I can also add :street, :state, etc... to this form?

I only generated a model, and there is no controller for businesses yet.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't necessarily need a business controller, but you will need a user controller. You can have your user controller save associated objects for your user by way of nested attributes.

Firstly, allow you user model to accept nested attributes for the business relation:

user.rb

accepts_nested_attributes_for :business

then add fields_for the business object into your user form:

<%= form_for(@user) do |f| %>
  <div class="field">
    <%= f.label :company_name %>
    <%= f.text_field :company_name %>
  </div>

  <%= fields_for :business do |fields| %>
    <%= fields.text_field :name %>
  <% end %>
  <div class="actions">
    <%= f.submit %>
  </div>
<% end %>

The business attributes will come through as part of the params user => {:name => 'Jim', :business_attributes => {:name => 'Jims business'}}

You can then pass these straight into the update of your user object in the create or update calls of your user controller:

def update
  @user = User.find(params[:id])
  @user.update_attributes(params)
end

And the business params will be handled by the accepts_nested_attributes functionality!

The example above explains a single instance example, since you have a has_many relation you will need to take the above as a starting point and learn how to adapt it to allow many child items. Below are some resources to help you learn this, rather than giving you the entire code and you not learn anything!

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awesome thanks for the help! –  andrewliu Jun 4 '13 at 2:22

Of course you need a controller. Not necessarily the same controller, but one is needed.

The controller is needed to connect the view and the model. Without it when you submit your data there is no action to send it. Obviously, the database won't be modified this way. You can't even display your view without an action in the controller.

Models without corresponding containers are only used when it is closely attached some other model, like a forum-comment pair. So you can let the user controller to handle business data, but that is not really recommended.

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