Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C++11 (N3485) 10.1.4 [class.mi] it says:

For each distinct occurence of a non-virtual base class in the class lattice of the most derived class, the most derived object shall contain a corresponding distinct base class subobject of that type.

For each distinct base class that is specified virtual, the most derived class shall contain a single base class object of that type.

Consider the following C++11 code:

struct B {};

struct BV : virtual B {};
struct BN : B {};

struct C1 : BV, BN {};
struct C2 : BV, BN {};

struct D : C1, C2 {};

Firstly, for clarity, how many vertices does the class lattice of D have?

Secondly, how many distinct subobjects of type B does the standard require that a most derived object of type D have?

update:

Which of the following is the class lattice?

(1)

    B     B     B    B
    ^     ^     ^    ^
    |     |     |    |
    BV    BN    BV   BN
    ^     ^     ^    ^
    |     |     |    |
     \   /       \  /
       C1         C2
         \        /
          \      /
           -  D -

(2)

    B<---------
    ^          \
    |           |
    |     B     |    B
    |     ^     |    ^
    |     |     |    |
    BV    BN    BV   BN
    ^     ^     ^    ^
    |     |     |    |
     \   /       \  /
       C1         C2
         \        /
          \      /
           -  D -

(3)

       B   
      /  \     
     /    \ 
    BV    BN
    | \  / |
    |  \/  |
    |  / \ |
    | /   \|
    C1     C2
     \    /
      \  /
       D

If the intention is that it is (1) then isn't it impossible to have any DAG that isn't a tree? (ie a diamond is impossible) If so wouldn't it be better to call it the class tree?

If it is (2) wouldn't it be sufficient to say "for each occurence of a base class in the class lattice there is a corresponding base class subobject" ?. That is, if the construction of the lattice already depends on virtual and non-virtual base class relationships to select edges and vertices?

If it is (3) then isn't the language incorrect in the standard because there can only ever be one occurence of a class in the class lattice?

share|improve this question
    
1. there are 10 vertices 2. there are 2 non-virtual B's and 1 virtual B –  Tom_Crusoe Jun 2 '13 at 20:13
    
@fatih_k: How did you arrive at 10? –  Andrew Tomazos Jun 2 '13 at 20:15
    
from D to C's there are 2 vertices, C1 to B's 2, C2 to B's 2, there are 2 BV' and 1 vertex to virtual B, and 2 vertices from BN to B : total 9 sorry. –  Tom_Crusoe Jun 2 '13 at 20:20
    
@faith_k: Are you conflating edges and vertices possibly? –  Andrew Tomazos Jun 2 '13 at 20:21
2  
@faith_k: Perhaps your claim would be clearer if you listed the names of each of the 10 vertices. –  Andrew Tomazos Jun 2 '13 at 20:36

1 Answer 1

Which of the following is the class lattice?

2

Demonstration:

#include <iostream>

struct B {};

struct BV : virtual B {};
struct BN : B {};

struct C1 : BV, BN {};
struct C2 : BV, BN {};

struct D : C1, C2 {};

int
main()
{
    D d;
    C1* c1 = static_cast<C1*>(&d);
    BV* bv1 = static_cast<BV*>(c1);
    BN* bn1 = static_cast<BN*>(c1);
    B* b1 = static_cast<B*>(bv1);
    B* b2 = static_cast<B*>(bn1);
    C2* c2 = static_cast<C2*>(&d);
    BV* bv2 = static_cast<BV*>(c2);
    BN* bn2 = static_cast<BN*>(c2);
    B* b3 = static_cast<B*>(bv2);
    B* b4 = static_cast<B*>(bn2);
    std::cout << "d = " << &d << '\n';
    std::cout << "c1 = " << c1 << '\n';
    std::cout << "c2 = " << c2 << '\n';
    std::cout << "bv1 = " << bv1 << '\n';
    std::cout << "bv2 = " << bv2 << '\n';
    std::cout << "bn1 = " << bn1 << '\n';
    std::cout << "bn2 = " << bn2 << '\n';
    std::cout << "b1 = " << b1 << '\n';
    std::cout << "b2 = " << b2 << '\n';
    std::cout << "b3 = " << b3 << '\n';
    std::cout << "b4 = " << b4 << '\n';
}

My output:

d = 0x7fff5ca18998
c1 = 0x7fff5ca18998
c2 = 0x7fff5ca189a0
bv1 = 0x7fff5ca18998
bv2 = 0x7fff5ca189a0
bn1 = 0x7fff5ca18998
bn2 = 0x7fff5ca189a0
b1 = 0x7fff5ca189a8
b2 = 0x7fff5ca18998
b3 = 0x7fff5ca189a8
b4 = 0x7fff5ca189a0

If it is (2) wouldn't it be sufficient to say "for each occurence of a base class in the class lattice there is a corresponding base class subobject" ?. That is, if the construction of the lattice already depends on virtual and non-virtual base class relationships to select edges and vertices?

Merging your suggestion...

A base class specifier that contains the keyword virtual, specifies a virtual base class. For each distinct occurrence of a non-virtual base class in the class lattice of the most derived class, the most derived object (1.8) shall contain there is a corresponding distinct base class subobject of that type. For each distinct base class that is specified virtual, the most derived object shall contain a single base class subobject of that type.

I'm not an expert in the language half of the standard. However when I read your modified specification, I don't see how:

class V { /∗...∗/ };
class A : virtual public V { /∗ ... ∗/ };
class B : virtual public V { /∗ ... ∗/ };
class C : public A, public B { /∗...∗/ };

Results in Figure 4:

   V
  / \
 /   \
A     B
 \   /
  \ /
   C

I don't see another place in the standard that specifies that although V appears twice in the class hierarchy below C, only one subobject of type V actually exists because of the use of the virtual keyword.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree that (2) is the subobject lattice, but I don't think the standard has clearly specified if the class lattice is (1) or (2) –  Andrew Tomazos Jun 3 '13 at 3:33
    
@user1131467 Could you clarify the terms subobject lattice and class lattice? I've never heard the term lattice used in this context before and I can't understand your comment. –  Mark B Jun 3 '13 at 3:51
    
@MarkB: Well the precise definition is what we are trying to clarify. The terms are both used in section 10.1 of the C++ standard, but their definition is a little vague. –  Andrew Tomazos Jun 3 '13 at 6:35
1  
If there were a precise meaning of the term "class lattice" intended, such a definition would appear in 1.3 [intro.defs]. The term "class lattice" has no precise definition is used in the spirit of having a "commonly understood" definition. In your example, all class Bs have the same type. So in that sense, (3) might be a better diagram for you. That part is assumed to be understood and [class.mi] is just trying to explain how many subobjects of each type are laid out in memory, and how each subobject can be related to other subobjects via static_cast and dynamic_cast. –  Howard Hinnant Jun 3 '13 at 15:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.