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Given two integers:

a <- 1L
b <- 1L

As I would expect, adding, subtracting, or multiplying them also gives an integer:

class(a + b)
# [1] "integer"
class(a - b)
# [1] "integer"
class(a * b)
# [1] "integer"

But dividing them gives a numeric:

class(a / b)
# [1] "numeric"

I think I can understand why: because other combinations of integers (e.g. a <- 2L and b <- 3L) would return a numeric, it is the more general thing to do to always return a numeric.

Now onto exponentiation:

class(a ^ b)
# [1] "numeric"

This one is a bit of a surprise to me. Can anyone explain why it was designed this way?

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I guess it's because the result can lead to Inf?? as.integer(Inf) would result in NA. Ex: 2L ^ 10000L –  Arun Jun 2 '13 at 22:07
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While I like the selected answer, perhaps one could ask whether there's any advantage to having the actual code for exponentiation create yet another "corner case." Especially if either R code or the unix pow function which can be called uses logs to calculate exponents in the first place. –  Carl Witthoft Jun 3 '13 at 1:02
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4 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

This covers the case when the exponent is negative.

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Consider ^ as a family of functions, f(a)(b) = a^b. For a=2, the domain for which this returns integer is limited to the values [0,62] (assuming 64-bit signed integers). That is a very small subset of the valid inputs. The domain only gets smaller as a increases.

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interesting. I think I like Rob Lyndon's answer better ("the integers are not closed [mathematically] under the ^ operation"), but yours is reasonable ("the integers are not closed [computationally] under the ^ operation") -- but this gets tricky because one has to start deciding on mushy/pragmatic grounds ... –  Ben Bolker Jun 2 '13 at 22:15
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Its simple adding, subtracting, and multiplying two integers results in integer. while dividing or performing exponentiation results in number with/without decimal that why shown numeric instead of integer.

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and that's what the accepted answer already said... –  flodel Jun 3 '13 at 12:33
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Is it possible a^b was implemented as something like exp(b * log(a))?

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Without proof, this kind of remark is best left as a comment imo. –  Paul Hiemstra Jun 3 '13 at 7:42
    
Oddly enough :-) that was my comment a while ago. I should be more proactive and go peek at the base source code. –  Carl Witthoft Jun 3 '13 at 11:49
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