Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a form that uses javascript to total it's values, It works fine until you enter a currency value that has cents in it, so a value of $2.99 will only show 2.00 in the total. Here is my jsFiddle http://jsfiddle.net/vegas/JwFCB/

    function multiplyRow(row) {

    var this_qty = row + "_value1"
    var this_price = row + "_value2"
    var this_extend = "extend" + row;
    document.getElementById(this_extend).value = (parseInt(document.getElementById(this_qty).value) * parseInt(document.getElementById(this_price).value)) || 0;
    summate();

}

function rateRow(row) {
    var this_payrate = "payrate" + row;
    var this_hours = "hours" + row;
    var this_subtot = "subtotal" + row;
    document.getElementById(this_subtot).value = (parseInt(document.getElementById(this_payrate).value) * parseInt(document.getElementById(this_hours).value)) || 0;
    getlabor();

}

function summate() {
    var materialcost = 0
    for (var i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {
        var id = "extend" + i;
        var thisVal = parseInt(document.getElementById(id).value, 10) || 0;
        materialcost += thisVal;
    }
    document.getElementById("materialcost").value = materialcost || 0;
    tax();
    grandTotal();
}

function getlabor() {
    var labortotal = 0
    var hourCounter = 0
    for (var i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {
        var id = "subtotal" + i;
        var idHours = "hours" + i;
        var thisVal = parseInt(document.getElementById(id).value, 10) || 0;
        var thisValHours = parseInt(document.getElementById(idHours).value, 10) || 0;
        labortotal += thisVal;
        hourCounter += thisValHours;

    }
    document.getElementById("labortotal").value = labortotal || 0;
    document.getElementById("totalhours").value = hourCounter || 0;
    grandTotal();

}

function tax() {
    var materialcost = document.getElementById('materialcost').value || 0;
    var shipping = document.getElementById('shipping').value || 0;
    var salestax = (Math.round(((materialcost / 100) * 8.1) * 100) / 100) || 0;
    var materialtotal = ((materialcost * 1) + (salestax * 1) + (shipping * 1)) || 0;

    document.getElementById('materialcost').value = materialcost;
    document.getElementById('salestax').value = salestax;
    document.getElementById('shipping').value = shipping;
    document.getElementById('materialtotal').value = materialtotal;
    grandTotal();


}

function grandTotal() {
    var labor = parseInt(document.getElementById("labortotal").value, 10) || 0;
    var material = parseFloat(document.getElementById("materialtotal").value, 10) || 0;
    document.getElementById('grandtotal').value = (labor + material).toFixed(2);
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

a decimal value will only show as integer

Then don't use parseInt, but parseFloat.

share|improve this answer
    
Bergi I changed it to parseFloat but now my totals show up as 29.4900000 –  Jason Jun 2 '13 at 22:57
    
@jason—the trick is to work in integer minor units (e.g. cents), then convert to major units ($) only for the final display. –  RobG Jun 2 '13 at 23:00
    
@RobG you're giving me more credit at understanding javascript than I really have. lol –  Jason Jun 2 '13 at 23:01
    
@Jason: Check out stackoverflow.com/q/6466846 and similar questions - you can just use .toFixed(2) on it for simplicity. Btw, don't forget that you're dealing with floating-point numbers here. –  Bergi Jun 2 '13 at 23:08
    
@Bergi Thanks, I'm using toFixed(2) in my grandtotal already but changing this parseFloat(document.getElementById(id).value, 10) to this parseFloat(document.getElementById(id).value, 100) actually solved my issues. –  Jason Jun 2 '13 at 23:33

Just a comment:

Mathematics with strings is only problematic where you are using the overloaded "+" operator. In your calculations, you can use:

document.getElementById(this_extend).value = document.getElementById(this_qty).value) * document.getElementById(this_price).value;

The only advantage of parseInt and parseFloat is that they trim trailing non-digit values. You should be validating user input before using it in calculations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Rob I'll give this a shot and see how it works out! –  Jason Jun 2 '13 at 23:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.