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How I read in the specific value of an XML attribute from a node when my XML looks like the following:

<Settings>
  <Display_Settings>
    <Screen>
      <Name Name="gadg" />
      <ScreenTag Tag="asfa" />
      <LocalPosition X="12" Y="12" Z="12" />
    </Screen>
  </Display_Settings>
</Settings>

I only know how to read in the inner text value of XML and not the attribute value. For instance, I want the value of X in LocalPosition. This is what I've tried so far;

    XmlNodeList nodeList = xmlDoc.GetElementsByTagName("Screen");

    foreach (XmlNode nodeInfo in nodeList)
    {
        XmlNodeList nodeContent = nodeInfo.ChildNodes;

        foreach (XmlNode nodeItems in nodeContent)
        {
            if (nodeItems.Name == "Tag")
            {
                print("There is a name");
            }
            if (nodeItems.Name == "LocalPosition")
            {
                print("TEST");
            }
        }
    }

Though for what I want to do, I think this is the wrong way to go about it. Can someone point in the right direction please?

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4 Answers 4

You can use LINQ to XML:

var xdoc = XDocument.Load(path_to_xml);
int x = (int)xdoc.Descendants("LocalPosition").First().Attribute("X");

Or with XPath

int x = (int)xdoc.XPathSelectElement("//LocalPosition").Attribute("X");
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string XValue= nodeItems.Attributes["X"].Value; // will solve your problem.
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I was a little confused when I first started parsing XML with C# too! Instead of trying to write it all yourself .NET provides System.XML.Linq and System.XML.Serialization to help us with all of the hard stuff!

This approach is slightly different as we:

  1. Load the XML document into a System.XML.Linq.XDocument,
  2. Deserialize the XDocument into .NET objects that we can use as we please =]

I hope you don't mind, but I tweaked your XML example a little bit. Try to avoid using too many attributes within your elements, as they tend to reduce readability. The first line of the XML sample just highlights the version that is being used.

You should be able to copy and paste the code sample below into a new console application to get a feel for how it works. Just make sure your XML file is in the ..\bin\Debug folder (otherwise you will need to provide a full file path reference to it).

As you can see, in this example your XML elements (Display_Settings, Screen, Name, ScreenTag, and LocalPosition) are all classes that we decorate with XMLElement attributes. These classes just have public properties that are automatically populated when we call Deserialize(). Neat!

The same applies to the X, Y and Z attributes.

There are a bunch of tutorials that can explain this a lot better than me - enjoy! =]

XML Example

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<Settings>
  <Display_Settings>
    <Screen>
        <Name>NameGoesHere</Name>
        <ScreenTag>ScreenTagGoesHere</ScreenTag>
        <LocalPosition X="12" Y="12" Z="12" />
    </Screen>
  </Display_Settings>
</Settings>

Complete Code Sample

using System;
using System.Xml.Linq;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // Create XDocument to represent our XML file
            XDocument xdoc = XDocument.Load("XmlFile.xml");

            // Create a deserializer and break down our XML into c# objects
            XmlSerializer deserializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Settings));

            // Deserialize into a Settings object
            Settings settings = (Settings)deserializer.Deserialize(xdoc.CreateReader());

            // Check that we have some display settings
            if (null != settings.DisplaySettings)
            {
                Screen screen = settings.DisplaySettings.Screen;
                LocalPosition localPosition = screen.LocalPosition;

                // Check to make sure we have a screen tag before using it
                if (null != screen.ScreenTag)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("There is a name: " + screen.ScreenTag);
                }

                // We can just write our integers to the console, as we will get a document error when we
                // try to parse the document if they are not provided!
                Console.WriteLine("Position: " + localPosition.X + ", " + localPosition.Y + ", " + localPosition.Z);
            }            

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    [XmlRoot("Settings")]
    public class Settings
    {
        [XmlElement("Display_Settings")]
        public DisplaySettings DisplaySettings { get; set; }
    }

    public class DisplaySettings
    {
        [XmlElement("Screen")]
        public Screen Screen { get; set; }
    }

    public class Screen
    {
        [XmlElement("Name")]
        public string Name { get; set; }

        [XmlElement("ScreenTag")]
        public string ScreenTag { get; set; }

        [XmlElement("LocalPosition")]
        public LocalPosition LocalPosition { get; set; }
    }

    public class LocalPosition
    {
        [XmlAttribute("X")]
        public int X { get; set; }

        [XmlAttribute("Y")]
        public int Y { get; set; }

        [XmlAttribute("Z")]
        public int Z { get; set; }
    }
}
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Try with nodeItems.Attributes["X"].Value

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Could you explain why do you recommend Equals()? It's much less readable and will work the same as ==. –  svick Jun 3 '13 at 9:28
    
of course, == compares object references, and asks whether the two references are the same. / equals() compares object contents, and asks whether the objects represent the same concept. –  mpacheco Jun 3 '13 at 10:53
1  
You're wrong about that, this is not Java. In C# string overloads the == operator. That means that == also compares values, not references. –  svick Jun 3 '13 at 10:59
    
Ok, I understand and you're right, then I'll leave it as "habit" –  mpacheco Jun 3 '13 at 11:07

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