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I have a SSLServerSocket in Java, when a client is connected, I create a thread for its communication:

    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "keystore");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword", "password");


    SSLServerSocket server = (SSLServerSocket)null;

    if(ipSocket == null){
        ipSocket = new HashMap<String,java.net.Socket>();
    }

    try {

        SSLServerSocketFactory sslserversocketfactory = (SSLServerSocketFactory) SSLServerSocketFactory.getDefault();
        server = (SSLServerSocket) sslserversocketfactory.createServerSocket(4380);
        log.info("Server started");

    } catch(IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    while(true){

        try {
            SSLSocket client = (SSLSocket) server.accept();
            log.info("new client");


        } catch (Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace();

        }
    }

The problem is when the code sometimes rejects connections. It happens when the code is running for a while, so I think the problem is the clients lost the connection and reconect, but the previous thread is still alive, and there is a maximun SSLServerSockets.

Could this happen? What number is the maximun?

How can I kill the threads when a disconection happens?

share|improve this question
    
Your title has nothing to do with your question. There is no such thing as an SSLSocketServer, and there is only one SSLServerSocket in evidence in your code. Do you mean SSLSocket? –  EJP Jun 3 '13 at 10:15
    
it was a mistake, its a SSLServerSocket. Regards –  user1256477 Jun 3 '13 at 10:17
    
There is still only one of them in your code. Not a real question without a stack trace and an indication of where the exception was thrown. –  EJP Jun 3 '13 at 10:18
    
I dont know the exception code. –  user1256477 Jun 3 '13 at 10:23
    
You know that it 'rejects connections' and you don't know what the symptoms of that are? Hard to believe. In any case you are just going to have to discover them, and post them here. –  EJP Jun 3 '13 at 10:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Based on your code and my understanding of networking (both from the lower level and from the API level) you may be incorrectly using the API.

At a high level, you want to do this a little differently

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "keystore");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword", "password");
    SSLServerSocket server = (SSLServerSocket)null;
    if(ipSocket == null){
        ipSocket = new HashMap<String,java.net.Socket>();
    }

    try {
        SSLServerSocketFactory sslserversocketfactory = (SSLServerSocketFactory) SSLServerSocketFactory.getDefault();
        // Creates a socket with a default backlog of 50 - meaning
        // There will be a maximum of 50 client connection attempts on this 
        // socket after-which connections will be refused. If the server is
        // overwhelmed by more than that number of requests before they can be
        // accepted, they will be refused
        // The API allows for you to speccify a backlog.
        server = (SSLServerSocket) sslserversocketfactory.createServerSocket(4380);
        log.info("Server started");
    } catch(IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    while(true){
        try {
            // This will take one of the waiting connections
            SSLSocket client = (SSLSocket) server.accept();
            log.info("new client");
            // HERE is where you should create a thread to execute the
            // conversation with the client.
        } catch (Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

I hope that more correctly answers your question.

In regards to the comment by EJP - I have updated my explanation and cited the documentation located here:

The maximum queue length for incoming connection indications (a request to connect) is set to the backlog parameter. If a connection indication arrives when the queue is full, the connection is refused.

share|improve this answer
    
The 'backlog' doesn't define the maximum number of connections. It defines the maximum number of pending connectors that haven't been returned by accept() yet. A server like this can support thousands of concurrent connections. Accepting a connection doesn't alter the backlog value. The 'backlog' value you provided is the default on most platforms, so it wouldn't actually change anything. –  EJP Jun 3 '13 at 11:59
    
how can I raise this number? –  user1256477 Jun 7 '13 at 11:38

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