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I am trying to replace the values in my dictionary with values from a list.

I have:

list1 = ['10 2', '8 6']

d = {'0.25': ['11 3', '9 1'], '0.75': ['3 9'], '0.5': ['10 12', '6 0'], '0.0': ['1 8']}

and I would like my dictionary to look like:

dFinal = {'0.25': ['10 2'], '0.75': ['3 9'], '0.5': ['8 6'], '0.0': ['1 8']}

Generally, if a value for my key is a list with two items, I would like to replace that value with the particular item from list1. I would like the method to work for list1 with any number of items and it seems to be my problem.

So far I got:

for key in d:
    if len(d[key]) == 2:
        d[key] = list1[0]

but it only replaces everything with one value and I would like to avoid calling static indexes as the length of my list1 can vary... Am I missing a loop of some-kind?

Cheers!

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Why is ['11 3', '9 1'] replaced by ['10 2'] and ['10 12', '6 0'] by ['8 6']. By which general rule are the items from list1 taken as a replacement? –  user1907906 Jun 3 '13 at 10:06
3  
Beware, a dictionary isn't guaranteed to preserve the order of the keys. –  Andy Hayden Jun 3 '13 at 10:11
    
Right, keys in your dictionary are not ordered. In which oreder do you want them to be replaced? –  kirelagin Jun 3 '13 at 10:14
    
The rule is that the first item in the list1 replaces first instance of value with two items. I was not aware that the order may change... The items in the list1 are averages: for '11 3' and '9 1' the average is '10 2' –  kate88 Jun 3 '13 at 10:20
    
@kate88 there is not such thing as “first value” in the dictionary. How do you want your keys to be ordered? By value? By insertion time? –  kirelagin Jun 3 '13 at 10:26

5 Answers 5

You can add a simple counter (a new variable).

i = 0
for key in d:
    #check if we're not out of bounds
    if i >= len(list1):
        break
    if len(d[key]) == 2:
        d[key] = [list1[i]]
        i+=1
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What does i++ mean? Did you run your code? –  Mike Müller Jun 3 '13 at 10:12
    
@MikeMüller The point of any answer is not working code, but working idea. –  kirelagin Jun 3 '13 at 10:13
    
@MikeMüller most languages i++ means the same as i += 1 it seems that python is a wee different –  Martyn Jun 3 '13 at 10:15
    
@Martyn Yes, it is i += 1. –  Mike Müller Jun 3 '13 at 10:18
    
@kirelagin It is very frustrating for new users to try out some code that is supposed to be a solution that does not work. They think they did something wrong. If it looks like Python, it should run. Otherwise use pseudo code and make it look like pseudo code. –  Mike Müller Jun 3 '13 at 10:21
list1 = ['10 2', '8 6']
d = {'0.25': ['11 3', '9 1'], '0.75': ['3 9'], '0.5': ['10 12', '6 0'], '0.0': ['1 8']}
iter_list = iter(list1)
for key, value in d.items():
    if len(value) == 2:
        try:
            d[key] = [next(iter_list)]
        except StopIteration:
            break

Result:

{'0.0': ['1 8'], '0.25': ['10 2'], '0.5': ['8 6'], '0.75': ['3 9']}
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thank you all for you help! –  kate88 Jun 3 '13 at 11:06

This should do the trick:

replace = [x for x in d if len(d[x]) == 2]
for (i, x) in enumerate(replace):
   d[x] = [list1[i]]

However, I think you need to be very careful here as a dictionary is not an ordered list, so if the elements in list1 are going to be mapped correctly, you'll need to check that Python hasn't shuffled the dictionary at all. The code above will work fine with the example provided, but the robustness of any solution to this formulation is going to depend on what you're doing with your dictionary (and list1) elsewhere.

Sorry to be finicky, but I've had problems with Python shuffling dictionaries in the background and it ruining my algorithm before.

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You should add that this will only work if list1 has at least as many elements as the dictionary has values that are lists of two elements. –  user1444165 Jun 3 '13 at 10:22
    
Agreed, I simply assumed that would be the case from the question, but it will cause an error if not. Easy enough to add the clause if i == len(list1): break to cover this. –  richsilv Jun 3 '13 at 10:35
    
@all thank you all for you help! –  kate88 Jun 3 '13 at 11:05

You can use zip()

>>> list1 = ['10 2', '8 6']
>>> for x, y in zip(list1,d.items()):
...     d[y[0]] = [x]
... 
>>> print d
{'0.25': ['10 2'], '0.5': ['8 6'], '0.75': ['3 9'], '0.0': ['1 8']}

Explanation:

zip(list1,d.items())

Returns:

[('10 2', ('0.25', ['10 2'])), ('8 6', ('0.5', ['8 6']))]

It only gets the values of keys which is a length of two, as that is what zip() does. Then I iterate through the list, changing the values of keys in the dictionary corresponding to the first value in the zip(list1,d.items()).

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I don't think that's strictly correct: in this case zip is returning what you want because Python is reordering the dictionary such that the keys with values of length 2 are all at the beginning (not sure why), so they get taken by the zip. If the length of list1 is longer than the number of items with length two, zip will return items of length 1 as well. –  richsilv Jun 3 '13 at 11:01

Using filter, zip and the update function you can achieve this in a quiete simple way:

list1 = ['10 2', '8 6']

d = {'0.25': ['11 3', '9 1'], '0.75': ['3 9'], '0.5': ['10 12', '6 0'], '0.0': ['1 8']}

print d
target_keys = filter(lambda x: len(d[x]) == 2, d.keys())
new_list = zip(target_keys, list1)
new_dict = dict(new_list)
d.update(new_dict)
print d

The nice thing about zip is that it takes only the indexes that exists on both lists so you don't have to worry about out of range errors.

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