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First of all, I want you to know that I am relatively new at coding and I have superficial knowledge of Python and Javascript only.

I have this huge txt containing names and names of teams where data is structured as follows:

Name1, Surname1  Team1
                  Team2
                  Team3
Name2, Surname2  Team2
                  Team4
Name3, Surname3  Team1
                  Team5

Ideally, I would like to extract my data searching by Team# and returning the name of the people belonging to it.

Eg. I need components of team1 and team2. My new txt output should look like this:

Team1, Name1, Surname1, Name3, Surname3
Team2, Name1, Surname1, Name2, Surname2

Thank you very much for your help

share|improve this question
    
In which way is your Input Structured now? One Line, multi Line and when is a line brake? – Johannes Jun 3 '13 at 10:48
    
Can there be spaces in surnames and/or team names? Are there tab characters in between, or is team name in a fixed column? – Janne Karila Jun 3 '13 at 11:27
    
@Johannes: the input is pretty messy. The only "structured" part is that of "Name1, Surname1" which has a comma and 1 space every time. As far as teams are concerned, they are usually placed in a fixed column, however, the first reported team (which is in the Name-Surname line) is often unaligned to the team column, depending on the length of the string containing "Name, Surname" – user2447387 Jun 3 '13 at 12:06
    
@JanneKarila: Yes there might be spaces since there are people with multiple names/surnames and teams names as well can be composed by multiple names. Yes, I think there are tabs in it (Emeditor signals them with horizontal arrows) and teams are usually placed in a distinct column (except for the first reported team, see comment above). Perhaps it may be useful to say that the file was originally a .list and I had to rename it to .txt to open it – user2447387 Jun 3 '13 at 12:14
    
So if the first line is eg.Robert, Van de Graaff Princeton University, how could the program know that Van de Graaff is surname and Princeton University is team? – Janne Karila Jun 3 '13 at 12:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A Python version could look this:

fobj_in = io.StringIO("""Name1, Surname1  Team1
                  Team2
                  Team3
Name2, Surname2  Team2
                  Team4
Name3, Surname3  Team1
                  Team5""")

fobj_out = io.StringIO()

from collections import defaultdict

teams = defaultdict(list)

for line in fobj_in:
    items = line.split()
    if len(items) == 3:
        name = items[:2]
        team = items[2]
    else:
        team = items[0]
    teams[team].append(name)

for team_name in sorted(teams.keys()):
    fobj_out.write(team_name + ', ')
    for name in teams[team_name][:-1]:
        fobj_out.write('{} {}, '.format(name[0], name[1]))
    name = teams[team_name][-1]
    fobj_out.write('{} {}\n'.format(name[0], name[1]))


fobj_out.seek(0)
print(fobj_out.read())

Output:

Team1, Name1, Surname1, Name3, Surname3
Team2, Name1, Surname1, Name2, Surname2
Team3, Name1, Surname1
Team4, Name2, Surname2
Team5, Name3, Surname3

Just do this to read from and write to an actual file:

fobj_in = open('in_file.txt')
fobj_out = open('out_file.txt', 'w')

EDIT

Note: The sample data seem to contain no case that woud result in multiple names on one line in the output.

With this input data, we need to change the code:

from collections import defaultdict
teams = defaultdict(list)
for line in fobj_in:
    if not line.strip():
        continue
    items = [entry.strip() for entry in line.split('\t') if entry]
    if len(items) == 2:
        name = items[0]
        team = items[1]
    else:
        team = items[0]
    teams[team].append(name)
for team_name in sorted(teams.keys()):
    fobj_out.write(team_name + ', ')
    for name in teams[team_name][:-1]:
        fobj_out.write('{}, '.format(name))
    name = teams[team_name][-1]
    fobj_out.write('{}\n'.format(name))

The resulting file content looks like this:

"Décore ta vie" (2003), Boilard, Naggy
"Mouki" (2010), Boileau, Sonia
A chacun sa place (2011), Boinem, Victor Emmanuel
Absence (2009) (V), Boillat, Patricia
C.A.L.L.E. (2005), Boillat, Patricia
Comment devenir un trou de cul et enfin plaire aux femmes (2004), Boire, Roger
Couleur de peau: Miel (2012), Boileau, Laurent
Hergé:Les aventures de Tintin (2004), Boillot, Olivier
Isola, là dove si parla la lingua di Bacco (2011)  (co-director), Boillat, Patricia
L'île (2011), Boillot, Olivier
La beauté fatale et féroce... (1996), Boire, Roger
Last Call Indian (2010), Boileau, Sonia
Le Temple Oublié (2005), Boillot, Olivier
Le pied tendre (1988), Boire, Roger
Legit (2006), Boinski, James W.
Nubes (2010), Boira, Francisco
Questions nationales (2009), Boire, Roger
Reconciling Rwanda (2007), Boiko, Patricia
Soviet Gymnasts (1955), Boikov, Vladimir
The Corporal's Diary (2008) (V)  (head director), Boiko, Patricia
Un gars ben chanceux (1977), Boire, Roger
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but will it handle multiple names, ie double names/surnames, separate team names...(see comments above) – user2447387 Jun 3 '13 at 14:06
    
It will handle the sample input. How do I know how your real input looks like? Are the compound names also separated by spaces, by commas, by something else? How many parts can a name, a surname or a team have? The code needs to be adapted to this. – Mike Müller Jun 3 '13 at 14:12
    
Yeah, I know, I'm sorry. I edited my question posting a link to a sample of my database to clarify things (dropbox.com/s/sl3tu7m77gei987/sample.txt). Well, actually there might be multiple names as well as surnames. Also, the team field is quite long, since it can add other kind of information (when available) and quotes once in a while. Ideally I should search my keyword in the "team" string (which contains as said, also other info), and the code should return the name of the people associated to it. – user2447387 Jun 3 '13 at 14:44
    
Added a version that works with sample data. – Mike Müller Jun 3 '13 at 15:15
    
Thank you. This might work. Afterwards, I could "filter" the output searching for "team" keywords (I don't need all the teams in the database, only 500 teams) and then somehow add the names and surnames on the same line. I probably have to do this since the team string is full of other info which I don't need, so there might exist Nubes (2010) and Nubes (2011) which are different but indeed they are the same "team". What do you think? Thanks for your help! – user2447387 Jun 3 '13 at 15:39

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