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I'm new to Rake and using it to build .net projects. What I'm interested in is having a Summary task that prints out a summary of what has been done. I want this task to always be called, no matter what tasks rake was invoked with.

Is there an easy way to accomplish this?

Thanks


Update on the question, responding to Patrick's answer what I want is the after task to run once after all other tasks, so the output I want is:

task :test1 do 
  puts 'test1'
end

task :test2 do 
  puts 'test2'
end

Rake::Task.tasks.each do |t|
    <Insert rake magic here>
#  t.enhance do 
#    puts 'after'
#  end
end

$ rake test1
test1
after

$rake test2
test2
after

$rake test1 test2  
test1
test2
after

and if

task :test3 =>[:test1, :test2]
   puts 'test3'
end

    $rake test3
test1
test2
test3
after

Even though the bounty is gone, any further help much appreciated. (Sadily I don't think that I can offer another bounty.)

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Posting this as a new answer to keep the other one available. This is much less elegant as I have to get into the guts of Rake and manually update the task list, but it works.

task :test1 do
  puts 'test1'
end

task :test2 do 
  puts 'test2'
end

task :after do
  puts 'after'
end

# top_level_tasks is't writable so we need to do this ugly
# instance_variable_set hack...
current_tasks =  Rake.application.top_level_tasks
current_tasks << :after
Rake.application.instance_variable_set(:@top_level_tasks, current_tasks)

Outputs:

$ rake test1
test1
after

$ rake test1 test2
test1
test2
after
share|improve this answer
    
GREAT! This is exactly what I want. I would love to know what magic is going on here. Can you give me more of an explination of what's happening? In the mean time, I'll see what I can find on google. –  Chasler Nov 20 '09 at 18:42
    
OK. I understand what's going on. Nice work. Thanks. –  Chasler Nov 20 '09 at 19:00
2  
Sure. As an aside, I'm at a conference and tracked down Jim Weirich (the author of rake) to see if this wis the best way to solve the problem. His answer was that Rake doesn't have a built in way to do this, but he's open to a patch if someone can come up with a generalized method for doing it. So the code: The Rake application has a reader to keep track of the tasks to run called 'top_level_tasks'. Because it's read only we need to read it out, update it and then use instance_variable_set to push the change back into the application. If it was read write we could to it all in one line. –  Patrick Ritchie Nov 20 '09 at 22:12
    
Thanks @PatrickRitchie that's great! Btw it will work on one line, like this: Rake.application.instance_variable_set(:@top_level_tasks, Rake.application.top_level_tasks + [:'printbot:status']). –  Zubin Oct 9 '12 at 4:50
1  
You don't need to use instance_variable_set at all— Rake.application.top_level_tasks << :after will work just fine. –  mrm May 13 '13 at 5:41

You should be able to do this with 'enhance':

Rake::Task["my_task"].enhance do
  Rake::Task["my_after_task"].invoke
end

This will cause 'my_after_task' to be invoked after 'my_task'.

If you want to apply this to all tasks, just loop over all the tasks and call enhance for each:

Rake::Task.tasks.each do |t| 
  t.enhance do 
    Rake::Task["my_after_task"].invoke
  end
end

Full test file:

task :test1 do 
  puts 'test1'
end

task :test2 do 
  puts 'test2'
end

Rake::Task.tasks.each do |t|
  t.enhance do 
    puts 'after'
  end
end

And the output:

$ rake test1
test1
after

$ rake test2
test2
after
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm afraid I didn't state my question clearly. I want the after task to run once, after other tasks are complete. So: $ rake test1 test2 would output test1 test2 after $rake test1 test1 after $rake test2 test2 after Any idea how to make that happen? –  Chasler Nov 18 '09 at 21:33
    
Ah ok, found a solution for you. Less elegant but it works. If you're interested I can explain in detail what I'm doing to get this to work... –  Patrick Ritchie Nov 19 '09 at 23:07

Found this simple elegant answer here that uses the Ruby method at_exit.

It's worth noting that the method defined after at_exit will run every time the rake script is invoked regardless of the task run, or if any task is run. This includes when running rake -T (to list available tasks). Make sure that at_exit only does anything if a previous task told it to do so.

rakefile.rb

desc "Lovely task a"
task :a do
  puts "a"
end

desc "Lovely task b"
task :b do
  puts "b"
end

task :cleanup do
  puts "cleanup"
end

at_exit { Rake::Task[:cleanup].invoke if $!.nil? }

shell

$ rake a b
a
b
cleanup
$ rake -T
rake a # Lovely task a
rake b # Lovely task b
cleanup

You also don't need to make it run a task if you don't want to.

at_exit do
  puts "cleanup"
end

Or make it run an method

def on_exit_do_cleanup
  puts "cleanup"
end

at_exit { on_exit_do_cleanup }

And you may want to make sure you only do the cleanup if a task actually ran so that rake -T won't also do a cleanup.

rakefile.rb

cleanup = false

desc "Lovely task a"
task :a do
  puts "a"
  cleanup = true
end

desc "Lovely task b"
task :b do
  puts "b"
  cleanup = true
end

task :cleanup do
  return unless cleanup
  puts "cleanup"
end

at_exit { Rake::Task[:cleanup].invoke if $!.nil? }
share|improve this answer

You could use the Kernel.trap call and attach to the "Exit" signal. It will fire upon both normal and abnormal exit.

Put this early in your rakefile:

Kernel.trap("EXIT") do
  Rake::Task[:final].invoke
end

Now any time you make a "final" task it will be executed at the very end of the program. no matter what.

task :final do
  puts "Hit return to continue..."
  STDIN.getc
end
share|improve this answer
    
Cool. Thanks. I'll try this next time I need it. –  Chasler Jun 25 '12 at 14:27

Apart from the ugly Rake.application.instance_variable_set, you can enhance the last task on the command-line like so:

  last_task = Rake.application.top_level_tasks.last
  Rake::Task[last_task].enhance do
    puts 'after'
  end

That should do exactly what you need to do!

share|improve this answer
    
You have one end at the end that shouldn't be there, I guess. –  Konstantin Haase Oct 12 '10 at 15:34
    
Thanks, Konstantin! I corrected it. –  awendt Oct 13 '10 at 9:13
    
Interesting. The accepted solution below is working, and I haven't had to modify the script for ages, but next time I do I'll look at using this method. It is definitely more elegant. –  Chasler Oct 18 '10 at 23:21

I don't know if it's the best way but it's the simpler:

Make all your "public tasks" Summary ones that call real tasks.

task :compile => :realcompile do
   summary stuff
end
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Sounds like you are looking for an after_filter, like rails uses. Take a look at actionpack/lib/action_controller/filters.rb in Rails for a sample implementation you could try to adapt. Since a rake file is just ruby, you could include your version in your top level rakefile, and set an :after filter on all tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
hmmmm. I'm hoping not to have to learn that much rails/ruby to get this done in the short term. :( –  Chasler Nov 6 '09 at 22:05

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