Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My movie database allows users to enter database into a sessions table which looks like this:

id | time | movie_id

Where time is the datetime the movie will be played and movie_id is a key relating to the movies table.

Now, I am trying to find consecutive days where the movies being played are the same. For example I want to be able to display.

3/6/2013 - 7/6/2013
Iron Man 3   7pm
Second Movie 10pm
ETC...

8/6/2013
Iron Man 3   8pm

9/6/2013 - 11/6/2013
Iron Man 3   7pm
Second Movie 10pm

Is there anyway to group using both the time and finding the consecutive days? I could change the table to a seperate date and time value if needed. Any help would be much appreciated. If this is only achievable in PHP, any idea on how to get started would also be appreciated.

Thank you. If you have any questions or this question isnt clear enough please ask.

share|improve this question
    
Yes, probably easier to do in PHP than in SQL. Just order the movies by time,movie_id, pick all until you get to the next day, and compare the result with what you got for yesterday. If the same, ignore, if not the same, set yesterday as end date and today as start date for a new range. If that makes sense :) –  Joachim Isaksson Jun 3 '13 at 11:28
    
@JoachimIsaksson I was thinking about that. But that means PHP could possibly have huge data sets to sort through. –  MichaelH Jun 3 '13 at 11:31
    
Don't you have any other restrictions on the data required to fetch for the page, like a start date/end date? –  Joachim Isaksson Jun 3 '13 at 11:33
    
Maybe, GROUP_CONCAT aggregate function could help you to make day representations, to accumulate days by those representations then. –  Olexa Jun 3 '13 at 11:36
    
As @Olexa said, GROUP_CONCAT can help to get a row per day, may be simpler to parse in PHP; sqlfiddle.com/#!2/e8b2e6/2 –  Joachim Isaksson Jun 3 '13 at 12:34
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, not so elegant, but working solution using GROUP_CONCAT aggregate function and variables within SELECT to groups similar consecutive days.

Your schema and example data set:

CREATE TABLE movies (
  id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
  title CHAR(64) NOT NULL
);
CREATE TABLE schedule (
  id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
  time TIMESTAMP NOT NULL,
  movie_id INT NOT NULL
);
INSERT INTO movies (title) VALUES
  ('Iron Man 3'),
  ('Second Movie')
;
INSERT INTO schedule (time, movie_id) VALUES
  ('2013-06-03 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-03 22:00:00', 2),
  ('2013-06-04 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-04 22:00:00', 2),
  ('2013-06-05 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-05 22:00:00', 2),
  ('2013-06-06 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-06 22:00:00', 2),
  ('2013-06-07 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-07 22:00:00', 2),
  ('2013-06-08 20:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-09 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-09 22:00:00', 2),
  ('2013-06-10 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-10 22:00:00', 2),
  ('2013-06-11 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-11 22:00:00', 2),
  ('2013-06-13 19:00:00', 1),
  ('2013-06-13 22:00:00', 2)
;

The query:

SELECT
    DATE_FORMAT(min_date, '%e/%c/%Y') AS beg_date,
    DATE_FORMAT(max_date, '%e/%c/%Y') AS end_date,
    title,
    LOWER(TIME_FORMAT(time, '%l%p')) AS `movie_time`
  FROM
    (SELECT
        MIN(min_date) AS min_date,
        MAX(max_date) AS max_date,
        range_schedule
      FROM
        (SELECT
            @min_date :=
              IF(@range_schedule <=> day_schedule
                 AND days.date <=> ADDDATE(@max_date, 1),
                @min_date,
                days.date
              ) AS min_date,
            @max_date := days.date AS max_date,
            @range_schedule := days.day_schedule AS range_schedule
          FROM
            (
              SELECT DATE(time) AS `date`, GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT(TIME(time), '-', movie_id) ORDER BY time) AS day_schedule
              FROM schedule
              GROUP BY DATE(time)
              ORDER BY DATE(time)
            ) AS days,
            (SELECT
              @min_date := '0000-00-00',
              @max_date := '0000-00-00',
              @range_schedule := NULL
            ) r
        ) days_of_ranges
      GROUP BY min_date, range_schedule
    ) ranges
    JOIN schedule ON DATE(schedule.time) = ranges.min_date
    JOIN movies ON movies.id = movie_id
  ORDER BY min_date, time
;

And the result:

|  BEG_DATE |  END_DATE |        TITLE | MOVIE_TIME |
-----------------------------------------------------
|  3/6/2013 |  7/6/2013 |   Iron Man 3 |        7pm |
|  3/6/2013 |  7/6/2013 | Second Movie |       10pm |
|  8/6/2013 |  8/6/2013 |   Iron Man 3 |        8pm |
|  9/6/2013 | 11/6/2013 |   Iron Man 3 |        7pm |
|  9/6/2013 | 11/6/2013 | Second Movie |       10pm |
| 13/6/2013 | 13/6/2013 |   Iron Man 3 |        7pm |
| 13/6/2013 | 13/6/2013 | Second Movie |       10pm |

All that you need to do in PHP is to store last BEG_DATE and END_DATE values to compare them with current ones to decide when to output range header.

share|improve this answer
    
That seems to work perfectly, except it doesnt recognise the day breaks. For example if the only thing I have in the database is 3 Iron Man Movies all at 7AM, on the 3rd, 12th and 20th, it will make my beginning date the 3rd, and the end date the 20th. Rather than returning 3 options. –  MichaelH Jun 3 '13 at 23:19
    
Hm, really. Fixed that. –  Olexa Jun 4 '13 at 7:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.