Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For just the problem without a story, skip to after the line.

I was fooling around with splitting up a string of some letters and numbers, both of which could occur, into two fields in a hashref. They should only appear if the field exists at all. The string might look like this: /^\D*\d*$/, for example ZR17, R15, -19, 22.

I did not want to simply put this into two variables like this, because the actual hashref is a little longer, and I wanted to keep stuff grouped together.

my $asdf = "ZR17";
my ($x, $y) = $asdf =~ m/^(\D*)(\d*)$/;
my $foo = {
  foo => $x,
  bar => $y
};

If I wanted to not have the key foo in case of the string 17, I could say:

my $foo = {
  ( $x ? ( foo => $x ) : () ),
  ( $y ? ( bar => $y ) : () ),
};

I came up with putting it all in the hashref assignment like this:

my $asdf = "ZR17";

my $foo = {
  ( $asdf =~ m/(\d+)/ ? ( foo => $1 ) : () ),
  ( $asdf =~ m/(\D+)/ ? ( bar => $1 ) : () ),
};

print Dumper $foo;

This yields the following:

$VAR1 = {
          'bar' => 'ZR',
          'foo' => 'ZR'
        };

Somehow it looks like there is only one $1 here, and it gets mixed up. If I coment out the second line, foo will be 17.

Can someone explain what is happening here? Where is the $1 getting lost/confused?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

According to perldoc (http://perldoc.perl.org/perlre.html):

These special variables, like ... the numbered match variables ($1 , $2 , $3 
, etc.) are dynamically scoped until the end of the enclosing block or until 
the next successful match, whichever comes first.

Therefore, $1 has been overwritten to 17 after $asdf =~ m/(\d+)/ as it found a match but hasn't encountered the end of the enclosing block yet.

This however,

my $foo = {
  ( eval{$asdf =~ m/(\D+)/ ? ( bar => $1 ) : ()} ),
  ( eval{$asdf =~ m/(\d+)/ ? ( foo => $1 ) : ()} ),
};

will give the expected result as the scopes are separated.

share|improve this answer
    
I was looking for that part of the perldoc, but did not see it. Thanks a lot. Very good answer by the way. I did not accept it because I think the map solution is better/more efficient. –  simbabque Jun 3 '13 at 13:16
    
That's fine, I wasn't trying to give a solution either, just to show where the problem is as that's what was asked:) –  David Jun 3 '13 at 13:19
    
You're right. That's what I asked. You do deserve the accept after all. :) –  simbabque Jun 3 '13 at 13:21

Perl 5.10+ will allow you to use named captures, which is essentially what you want to do. Any capture group that doesn't match will be stored in %+ with "" as the value in your case:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dump 'dd';

my $asdf = "ZR17";
$asdf =~ m/^(?<alpha>\D*)(?<num>\d*)$/;

my $foo = { map { $+{$_} ? ( $_ => $+{$_} ) : () } keys %+ };

dd $foo;  # { alpha => "ZR", num => 17 }
share|improve this answer

It looks like $1 for foo and bar is from last regex match,

my $asdf = "ZR17";

my $foo = {
  ( $asdf =~ m/(\D+)/ ? ( bar => $1 ) : () ),
  ( $asdf =~ m/(\d+)/ ? ( foo => $1 ) : () ),
};

print Dumper $foo;

output

$VAR1 = {
      'bar' => '17',
      'foo' => '17'
    };

This however works as expected,

my $foo = {
  ( map { (bar => $_) } $asdf =~ m/(\D+)/ ),
  ( map { (foo => $_) } $asdf =~ m/(\d+)/ ),
};

output

$VAR1 = {
      'bar' => 'ZR',
      'foo' => '17'
    };
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't think about that. Nice, thanks. –  simbabque Jun 3 '13 at 13:15

I guess the ternary operator doesn't evaluate $1 when it returns ( bar => $1 ) and ( foo => $1 ). So in the intermediary step you get

$foo = { ( bar => $1 ), ( foo => $1 ) };

And since $1 is by now the captured substring of 2nd match operation, you get the same values for both $foo{bar} and $foo{foo}.


Another way to achieve what you want (i.e. the hash element doesn't exist if corresponding match is not found):

my %patt = {
    foo => '(\d+)',
    bar => '(\D+)',
};

my %foo = map { $_ => $1 if $asdf =~ /$patt{$_}/ } keys %patt;

You can extend %patt when you need to match more patterns.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.