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Have a small table of 2 columns on MSSQL Server 2005 which contains a lot of information let's say about 1 billion records and it is constantly being written into.

Definition of the table is :

Create table Test(
id int identity(1,1) primary key ,
name varchar(30) )

Te PK is int which I choose it over uniqueidentifier for a number of reasons. The problem comes with the auto increment I want to reorganize the 'id' every time a row is deleted. The objective to this is leaving no gaps. The table is active and a lot of rows are written into it, so dropping a column is not an option also locking the table for a long time.

Quick example of what I want to accomplish:

I have this :

id | name

  • 1 | Roy
  • 2 | Boss
  • 5 | Jane
  • 7 | Janet

I want to reorganize it so it will look like this :

id | name

  • 1 | Roy
  • 2 | Boss
  • 3 | Jane
  • 4 | Janet

I am aware of DBCC CHECKIDENT (TableName, RESEED,position) but I am not sure it will benefit my case , because my table is big and it will take a lot of time to reposition also if I am not mistaken it will lock the table for a very long time. This table is not used by any other table. But if you like you can submit a suggestion to the same problem having in mind that the table is used by other tables.

EDIT :

The objective is to prove that the rows follow each other in case a row is deleted so I can see it is deleted and reinstate it.I was thinking of adding a third column that will contain a hash value from the row above , and if the row above is deleted I would know that I have a gap and need to restore it ,in that case the order will not matter because I can compare the has codes and see if they match , so I can see which row follows which.But still I wonder is there a more clever and safer way of doing this ?Maybe involve something else rather then hash codes , some other way of proving that the rows follow each other , or that the new row contains parts of the previous row?

EDIT 2 :

I'll try to explain it one more time if I can't well then I don't want to waste anyone's time.

In the perfect case scenario there will be nothing missing from this table , but due to server errors some data maybe deleted or some of my associates might be wasteful and delete it by fault.
I have logs and can recover that data, but I want to prove that the records are sequenced , that they follow each other even if there is a server error and some of them are deleted but later on reinstated. Is there a way to do this ?

Example: well let's say that 7 is deleted and after that reinstated as 23 , how would you prove that 23 is 7, meaning that 23 came after 6 and before 8 ?

share|improve this question
10  
Why on earth would you want to do this? Surrogate keys are supposed to be meaningless and the gaps are guaranteed to occur again. Especially you would not want to be continually renumbering a billion rows. – HLGEM Jun 3 '13 at 13:39
4  
You're solving the wrong problem. Why do you want to remove the gaps? – MatBailie Jun 3 '13 at 13:48
    
Not only why do you want to do this? Why go you need to do this? If this table is not used by any other table then why does it even need an ID? What is the purpose of an ID that is constantly changing? – Frisbee Jun 3 '13 at 14:39
2  
Even with your update, it's far from clear (for me) what you're trying to achieve - you seem to be proposing various (somewhat broken) solutions to a problem that you haven't explained to us. We won't be able to offer much help unless you can take a step back and explain the problem you're trying to solve (rather than the problems with the solutions that you're trying to implement) – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 3 '13 at 14:47
    
Saw the edit. Still makes no sense to me. Why do you allow a row to be deleted if it needs to be reinstated? Why would you store the hash code of a value to compare rather than the value itself. Hash codes are not guaranteed to be unique. – Frisbee Jun 3 '13 at 14:49

I would suggest not worrying about trying to reseed your Identity column -- let SQL Server maintain it's uniqueness for each row.

Generally this is wanted for presentation logic instead, in which case, you could use the ROW_NUMBER() analytic function:

SELECT Row_Number() Over (Order By Id) NewId,
  Id, Name
FROM YourTable
share|improve this answer

I agree with others that this shouldn't typically be done, but if you absolutely want to do it you can utilize the quirky update to get it done quickly, should be something like this:

DECLARE @prev_id INT = 0
UPDATE Test
SELECT id = CASE WHEN id - @prev_id = 1 THEN id
              ELSE @prev_id + 1
         END
   ,@prev_id = id
FROM test

You should read about the limitations of quirky update, primarily the conditions that must be met to ensure consistent output. This is a good article but they annoyingly have you sign in, but you can find other resources: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/68467/

Edit: Actually, in this case I think you could just use:

DECLARE @prev_id INT = 0
UPDATE Test
SELECT id = @prev_id + 1
          ,@prev_id = id
FROM Test 
share|improve this answer

The way to do it is to not implement your proposed fix.

Leave the identity alone.
If identity 7 is deleted you know it is just after 6 and and just before 8.

If you need them to stay in the same order then simple.
Place unique constraint on name.
Don't delete the record.
Just add a bool column for active.

share|improve this answer
    
well let's say that 7 is deleted and after that reinstated as 23 , how would you prove that 23 is 7, meaning that 23 came after 6 and before 8 ? – user2447961 Jun 4 '13 at 13:51
    
Then add that to the problem statement. – Frisbee Jun 4 '13 at 13:55
    
It is added in the EDIT2 section let me quote myself : I want to prove that the records are sequenced , that they follow each other even if there is a server error and some of them are deleted but later on reinstated ,either way I'll add this as an example to the problem statement. – user2447961 Jun 4 '13 at 13:58
    
We are supposed to know that is what you meant by sequenced. – Frisbee Jun 4 '13 at 14:03
    
How would you ever know that 23 was the former 7 and why would you care? What actual difference does it make if the accidentally deleted 7 is now 23? – HLGEM Jun 4 '13 at 14:05

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