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I have a 3D complex numpy array defined like this:

> import numpy as np
> a = np.random.rand(2,3,4) + np.random.rand(2,3,4) * 1j
> a
array([[[ 0.40506245+0.68587874j,  0.74700976+0.73208816j,
      0.42010818+0.31124884j,  0.27181199+0.54599156j],
    [ 0.29457621+0.34057513j,  0.82490182+0.63943948j,
      0.46887722+0.12734375j,  0.77184637+0.21522095j],
    [ 0.67774944+0.8208908j ,  0.41476702+0.85332392j,
      0.10084665+0.56146324j,  0.71325041+0.77306548j]],

   [[ 0.77843387+0.23660274j,  0.23671262+0.63997834j,
      0.60831419+0.41741288j,  0.53870756+0.13747055j],
    [ 0.12477767+0.54603678j,  0.60537090+0.89208227j,
      0.16027151+0.17575777j,  0.18801875+0.27282324j],
    [ 0.82308271+0.97238411j,  0.47458327+0.75200695j,
      0.16085009+0.60620705j,  0.79766571+0.76470634j]]])

I need to print it to a string s in a particular format which is a bit MATLAB-like, and the best way I found is the following: (To me the best way to describe the format is with this code)

> s = ''
> for k in range(a.shape[2]):
>   for j in range(a.shape[1]):
>     for i in range(a.shape[0]):
>       s += str(a[i,j,k].real) + ' '
>   for j in range(a.shape[1]):
>     for i in range(a.shape[0]):
>       s += str(a[i,j,k].imag) + ' '

I am not satisfied with this code which doesn't look very 'pythonic' to me (I come from C++ and don't know much about Python). I'm sure Python provides some good syntax that can be used here (like list comprehension for instance) but I am not very familiar with it.

Thus my question is the following: how can I improve this code to be more pythonic ?

Edit: This 3D-array is seen as an array of 2-by-3 complex matrices. The format consists of printing the real part of the first matrix, then its imaginary part, and iterate that way over each matrices.

This is the format you get when you run this code in MATLAB:

> a = rand(2,3,4) + rand(2,3,4) * 1i;
> s = sprintf('%g %g ', [real(a) imag(a)]);

My main goal is to be compatible with this format.

share|improve this question
3  
I'm confused by your code. You're printing the real part of most of your numbers followed by the imaginary part of most of your numbers ... Is that really what you want? –  mgilson Jun 3 '13 at 14:11
    
Yes, the code prints the array in the desired format. –  yannsalaun1 Jun 3 '13 at 14:13
    
@DSM please, post this as an answer... –  Saullo Castro Jun 3 '13 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

string concatenation is usually done using join :

s += str(a[i,j,k].imag) + ' '

can be replaced by

s += ' '.join(str(a[i,j,k].imag))

Globally applied, a 1-liner could be:

s = ' '.join(' '.join(str(a[i,j,k].real) for j in range(a.shape[1]) for i in range(a.shape[0])) + ' ' + ' '.join(str(a[i,j,k].imag) for j in range(a.shape[1]) for i in range(a.shape[0])) for k in range(a.shape[2]))

Not so clear. I would keep the for ... k loop and write it this way:

s = ''
for k in range(a.shape[2]):
    s += ' '.join(str(a[i,j,k].real) for j in range(a.shape[1]) for i in range(a.shape[0]))
    s += ' '
    s += ' '.join(str(a[i,j,k].imag) for j in range(a.shape[1]) for i in range(a.shape[0]))
    s += ' '

Edit

This is quite heavy, and numpy has a lot of tools. Here is a simpler version. The first line reformats the matrix to ease the work of the second line:

b = [numpy.vstack((a.real.T[i], a.imag.T[i])) for i in range(a.shape[2])]
s = ' '.join(str(d) for x in b for d in x.flat)

Edit 2

It can still be simplified

' '.join([str(x) for x in np.hstack((a.T.real, a.T.imag)).flat])
share|improve this answer
    
+1 but what a monster! –  Saullo Castro Jun 3 '13 at 14:36

With enough thought you should be able to avoid creating an intermediate copy. But since life is short, how about:

' '.join(np.hstack([a.T.real, a.T.imag]).astype(str).flat)

For example:

>>> a
array([[[ 0.75878533+0.6450401j ,  0.97544304+0.95294337j,
          0.72619451+0.70150035j,  0.53653874+0.72336166j],
        [ 0.44497093+0.59486404j,  0.48346416+0.602289j  ,
          0.89508307+0.10804834j,  0.60925276+0.78463914j],
        [ 0.75324059+0.35750314j,  0.77764455+0.52714092j,
          0.60422248+0.45825998j,  0.06100151+0.98814297j]],

       [[ 0.25167445+0.26036597j,  0.14479218+0.63888545j,
          0.69195476+0.65571239j,  0.75384667+0.35208925j],
        [ 0.33299320+0.95810933j,  0.28706287+0.92696162j,
          0.80174074+0.73461441j,  0.64070651+0.95546677j],
        [ 0.32726129+0.28131131j,  0.84847281+0.0043481j ,
          0.20002495+0.92129643j,  0.85657582+0.17598515j]]])
>>> new = ' '.join(np.hstack([a.T.real, a.T.imag]).astype(str).flat)
>>> new
'0.758785326622 0.251674447258 0.444970928938 0.332993197954 0.753240586102 0.3272612899 0.645040097487 0.260365974319 0.59486403781 0.958109327206 0.357503144442 0.281311309104 0.975443036171 0.14479217684 0.483464161328 0.287062874161 0.777644547623 0.84847280757 0.952943365086 0.638885451204 0.602289004931 0.926961617163 0.527140924938 0.00434810439813 0.726194510838 0.691954756116 0.895083070782 0.801740737909 0.604222482831 0.200024953365 0.701500350108 0.655712387542 0.108048340908 0.734614410363 0.458259975834 0.921296429741 0.536538738872 0.75384667023 0.609252761053 0.640706514463 0.0610015096191 0.856575822125 0.723361662643 0.35208924756 0.784639135069 0.955466768932 0.988142972679 0.175985147504'
>>> original(a).strip() == new
True

Update: if .astype(str) isn't working for some reason, then as a fallback:

>>> new2 = ' '.join(map(str, np.hstack([a.T.real, a.T.imag]).flat))
>>> original(a).strip() == new2
True
share|improve this answer
    
this is giving me an array of zeros. apparently the astype(str) doesn't do that in my python. –  njzk2 Jun 3 '13 at 15:33
    
@njzk2: odd. Well, we can use map or a list comprehension instead. –  DSM Jun 3 '13 at 15:37

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