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Basic structure of my code is

class Foo{
  vector<string> _lines;
  vector<int> _n;
  public:
  ...
  bool Comp(int i, int j){
    return something that depends on _lines;
  }
  ...
  void doSomething(){
    std::sort(_n.begin(), _n.end(), Comp);
  }
  ...
};

But I get

error: no matching function for call to 
‘sort(std::vector<unsigned int>::iterator, 
std::vector<unsigned int>::iterator, <unresolved overloaded function type>)

How can I resolve this problem WITHOUT COPYING THE VECTORS? (because these vectors are very very big 17179508 strings to be precise).

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3 Answers 3

std::sort expects a binary predicate taking two ints in this case. A member function takes an implicit first parameter, so in all Foo::Comp takes three parameters. You could pass a non-member function, or a static member function, but neither of these would have access to Foo's data members. The simples way is to use std::bind to bind this to the first parameter of the member function:

#include <functional> // for std::bind
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

class Foo{
  vector<string> _lines;
  vector<int> _n;
 public:
  ...

  bool Comp(int i, int j){
    return something that depends on _lines;
  }
  ...
  void sort(){
    using namespace std::placeholders;
    std::sort(_n.begin(), _n.end(), std::bind(Comp, this, _1, _2));
  }
  ...
};
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This isn't the problem: The problem is that Comp is a non-static member function that hasn't has this bound. –  Mark B Jun 3 '13 at 16:31
    
error: invalid use of non-static data member ‘Foo::_lines’ in function Comp –  Pratik Deoghare Jun 3 '13 at 16:32
    
@PratikDeoghare My first answer was total nonsense. I have edited it. –  juanchopanza Jun 3 '13 at 16:40
    
@MarkB You were right, thanks. Fixed now. –  juanchopanza Jun 3 '13 at 16:42
    
error: no matching function for call to ‘foo::Comp(Foo* const, const std::_Placeholder<1>&, const std::_Placeholder<2>&)’ –  Pratik Deoghare Jun 3 '13 at 16:51

The most obvious initial suggestion is to aggregate your int and string into a struct or std::pair, have a single vector with the aggregate in it, and then sort that vector of aggregates.

But if the two vectors are in fact independent, I would suggest using an external predicate, instead of your Comp method:

struct Comp
{
    explicit Comp(vector<string>& lines) : lines_(lines) { }
    bool operator()(int i, int j) const
    {
        return something that depends on lines_;
    }

    vector<string>& lines_;
};

Then call it:

void doSomething()
{
    std::sort(_n.begin(), _n.end(), Comp(_lines));
}
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Will this copy create a copy of lines? Because number of string in lines is 17179508. :) –  Pratik Deoghare Jun 3 '13 at 16:54
    
@PratikDeoghare no, it will not. But the solution you chose will :-) –  juanchopanza Jun 3 '13 at 17:02
    
@Pratik Deoghare No copy of _lines will be made. –  Mark B Jun 3 '13 at 17:02
    
std::pair is probably not a good solution; the elements certainly have more meaningful names than first and second. But it sounds like he's trying to map int to string (but I'm not sure); this may be the error to begin with (and perhaps he should drop the vector of int completely). But your answer is more or less the right approach if he doesn't. –  James Kanze Jun 3 '13 at 17:10

What about using your object as the comparator itself. This compiles on gcc 4.6:

class Foo{
  std::vector<std::string> _lines;
  std::vector<int> _n;
  public:

  bool operator()(int i, int j){
    return false;
  }
  void doSomething(){
    std::sort(_n.begin(), _n.end(), *this);
  }
};

Edit:

Turns out that was not such a good idea, copying an object with 17M strings would incur a huge penalty. A nested class, taking a pointer, could be used instead. That would also allow us to have different comparators:

class Foo
{
  std::vector<std::string> _lines;
  std::vector<int> _n;

  class Bar
  {
  public:
      Bar( const Foo * foo ) : _foo( foo ) {}
      bool operator()( int i, int j )
      {
          act on _foo->_lines
      }
  private:
      const Foo * _foo;
  };

public:

  void doSomething(){
    std::sort(_n.begin(), _n.end(), Bar(this));
  }
};
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Amazing! Thanks! –  Pratik Deoghare Jun 3 '13 at 16:49
1  
That's not really a good idea. What happens if in one case, you need a less than comparison, and in another an equals comparison? –  James Kanze Jun 3 '13 at 16:53
3  
@PratikDeoghare beware, this makes a copy of the Foo instance. –  juanchopanza Jun 3 '13 at 17:00
    
And it's not clear to me what is being compared. std::sort cannot call a function taking int. –  James Kanze Jun 3 '13 at 17:06
1  
@PratikDeoghare stackoverflow.com/questions/3173520/… –  Diego Sánchez Jun 3 '13 at 17:33

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