Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was following this beginner tutorial on boost threads: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/279053/How-to-get-started-using-Boost-threads

Everything was going fine with this sample they provided:

#define BOOST_THREAD_USE_LIB

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time.hpp>

void workerFunc()
{
    boost::posix_time::seconds workTime(3);
    std::cout << "Worker: running" << std::endl;

    // Pretend to do something useful...
    boost::this_thread::sleep(workTime);
    std::cout << "Worker: finished" << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::cout << "main: startup" << std::endl;
    boost::thread workerThread(workerFunc);

    std::cout << "main: waiting for thread" << std::endl;
    workerThread.join();

    std::cout << "main: done" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

But then I decided to try it without the sleep function. So I commented out those lines.

#define BOOST_THREAD_USE_LIB

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time.hpp>

void workerFunc()
{
    //boost::posix_time::seconds workTime(3);
    std::cout << "Worker: running" << std::endl;

    // Pretend to do something useful...
    //boost::this_thread::sleep(workTime);
    std::cout << "Worker: finished" << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::cout << "main: startup" << std::endl;
    boost::thread workerThread(workerFunc);

    std::cout << "main: waiting for thread" << std::endl;
    workerThread.join();

    std::cout << "main: done" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I started to get the following compile error:

)]+0x40)||undefined reference to `_gmtime32'|

I've done quite a bit of snooping around trying to figure out what this means and why it is only happening when I remove those two lines. As of right now, I am leaning towards it being something to do with some kind of header, like time.h, that I have to include (although I tried that already obviously).

I am using a rather strange setup. Code::Blocks with mingw/gcc. I compiled the boost library myself with command line arguments following the codeblocks tutorial: http://wiki.codeblocks.org/index.php?title=BoostWindowsQuickRef

Everything seemed to work fine with this, but I suppose I could have built the libraries incorrectly.

I would dig deeper but the file name of the error is not standard and is listed as ")]+0x40)". I am not sure what this means - is it maybe some kind of file location address?

MORE INFO:

Windows XP 32 bit
CodeBlocks 10.05
MingW GCC 4.4.3
Boost 1_53_0

BUILD LOG:

Linking console executable: bin\Debug\Bjarne_Strousup_Samples.exe ....\CodeBlocks\lib\libboost_thread-mgw44-mt-1_53.a(thread.o):thread.cpp:(.text$_ZN5boost9date_time6c_time6gmtimeEPKlP2tm[boost::date_time::c_time::gmtime(long const*, tm*)]+0x40): undefined reference to `_gmtime32' collect2: ld returned 1 exit status Process terminated with status 1 (0 minutes, 6 seconds) 1 errors, 0 warnings

COMMAND LINE ATTEMPT:

C:\CodeBlocks Tests\BoostExamples>g++ main.cpp -lboost_thread -lboost_system -lb
oost_chrono
main.cpp:5:28: error: boost/thread.hpp: No such file or directory
main.cpp:6:31: error: boost/date_time.hpp: No such file or directory
main.cpp: In function 'int main()':
main.cpp:21: error: 'boost' has not been declared
main.cpp:21: error: expected ';' before 'workerThread'
main.cpp:24: error: 'workerThread' was not declared in this scope

C:\CodeBlocks Tests\BoostExamples>

LINKER SETTINGS: Linker Settings

IDM Link: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/aix/v6r1/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.aix.basetechref%2Fdoc%2Fbasetrf1%2Fctime.htm

I think the error is on this line of c_time.hpp:

  static std::tm* gmtime(const std::time_t* t, std::tm* result)
share|improve this question
    
I have no problem compiling and linking either of you examples with MinGW 4.7.2 and Boost 1.51 with the following command line: g++ test.cpp -lboost_thread -lboost_system -lboost_chrono (there's no `I option for boost because the boost headers have been added to the MinGW include directory so they're available implicitly). What versions of MinGW and Boost are you using? –  Michael Burr Jun 4 '13 at 5:02
    
And the )]+0x40)||undefined reference to '_gmtime32' error message is just a fragment of the full error. I assume that your IDE has clipped the bulk of the error message (due to line wrap?). You should look in the log file (hopefully it's easy to locate and/or convince the IDE to generate) for the full error. Knowing which module contains the reference to _gmtime32() might help point the way to the right solution. –  Michael Burr Jun 4 '13 at 5:57
    
Also, post the command line used to compile and link the program. The order that libraries are specified on the command line is significant (with the GNU linker), and that's probably why removing function calls results in the linker error. One of those function calls pulled in the _gmtime32() wrapper. But I think that whatever refers to _gmtime32() in your second example is in a library that's listed 'too late' in the list of libraries being searched by the linker. –  Michael Burr Jun 4 '13 at 6:00
    
@MichaelBurr I am not great with command lines. I've just been compiling it with Code::Blocks. But I posted my probably poorly executed attempt at using the command line. -- I also posted my linker settings in codeblocks. I've tried several different orderings of the library files in here, some orderings seem to cause other problems - so maybe there is a "correct" combination for these libraries in the linker settings. I also was able to generate the full build log - see above. The full error provides more information. It seems to be a problem in the thread library file- but I am not sure how. –  Stepan1010 Jun 4 '13 at 16:31
    
@MichaelBurr - I think I found the line in the library source files where the error is occuring. I did some more research on gmtime() and I found this warning from IBM: "Attention: Do not use the ctime, localtime, gmtime, or asctime subroutine in a multithreaded environment. See the multithread alternatives in the ctime_r (ctime_r, localtime_r, gmtime_r, or asctime_r Subroutine), localtime_r, gmtime_r, or asctime_r subroutine article."-link above. I also found a comment around this line implying they tried to use gmtime_r() but had a problem: "// gmtime_r() not in namespace std???" –  Stepan1010 Jun 4 '13 at 18:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.