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From the ReentrantReadAndWriteLock class javadoc:

void processCachedData() {
  rwl.readLock().lock();
  if (!cacheValid) {
     // Must release read lock before acquiring write lock
5:   rwl.readLock().unlock();
6:   rwl.writeLock().lock();
     // Recheck state because another thread might have acquired
     //   write lock and changed state before we did.
     if (!cacheValid) {
       data = ...
       cacheValid = true;
     }
     // Downgrade by acquiring read lock before releasing write lock
14:  rwl.readLock().lock();
15:  rwl.writeLock().unlock(); // Unlock write, still hold read
  }

  use(data);
  rwl.readLock().unlock();
}

Why we must release the read lock before acquiring the write lock as written in the comment? If the current thread holds the read lock, then it should be allowed to acquire the write lock when other threads are not reading anymore, regardless if the current thread holds also the read lock. This is the behavior I would expect. Eventually lock upgrade at the lines 4 and 5 and the lock downgrade at line 14 and 15 I would expect that to be done internally in the ReentrantReadAndWriteLock class. Why that is not possible?

In other words, I would expect the code to work fine like this:

void processCachedData() {
  rwl.readLock().lock();
  if (!cacheValid) {
     // The readlock is upgraded to writeLock when other threads 
     // release their readlocks.
     rwl.writeLock().lock();
     // no need to recheck: other threads can't have acquired  
     // the write lock since this thread still holds also the readLock!!!
     if (!cacheValid) {  
       data = ...
       cacheValid = true;
     }
     // Downgrade by acquiring read lock before releasing write lock
     rwl.writeLock().unlock(); // Unlock write, still hold read
  }

  use(data);
  rwl.readLock().unlock();
}

This looks much better and more safe way to handle locking, isn't it?

Can somebody explain why this weird implementation? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
You need to consider what would happen if two or more threads tried to do this at the same time. –  EJP Jun 4 '13 at 0:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem with upgrading a read lock to a write lock is, if two threads try to do it at the same time, it can lead to deadlock. Consider the following sequence:

  1. Thread A: acquires read lock
  2. Thread B: acquires read lock (Note that both threads now share the read lock).
  3. Thread A: tries to acquire write lock (blocks as thread B holds read lock)
  4. Thread B: tries to acquire write lock (blocks as thread A holds read lock)

Now there is a deadlock. Neither thread A or B can proceed, and neither will ever release the read lock.

share|improve this answer
    
synchronized deadlock replies (pun/oxymoron intended :-D ) –  Brian Roach Jun 3 '13 at 16:51
    
thanks. it makes sense. –  Luigi R. Viggiano Jun 3 '13 at 16:57
    
Some reader/writer locks allow a thread to acquire an "upgradeable reader" lock. If no other thread holds such a lock, an attempt to acquire one will succeed as would an attempt to acquire a read lock. If another thread already holds such a lock, however, the second attempt to acquire one will block until the first thread releases its lock or "demotes" it to non-upgradeable. Such locks have the advantage of guaranteeing that any observations made about the locked resource before upgrading to a write-only lock will remain valid. –  supercat Dec 2 '14 at 18:57

The Javadoc explicitly states upgrading a read lock to a write lock is not possible. The reason for that is because it can create a deadlock.

  • thread 1 acquire read lock
  • thread 2 acquire read lock
  • thread 1 ask to upgrade lock to write
  • thread 2 ask to upgrade lock to write

Both threads are now waiting on each other ... forever.

share|improve this answer

Reentrancy allows downgrading from the write lock to a read lock, by acquiring the write lock, then the read lock and then releasing the write lock. However, upgrading from a read lock to the write lock is not possible (which results in a deadlock).

Source: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/locks/ReentrantReadWriteLock.html

share|improve this answer
    
this is also written in the documentation. The question I am posing is why ? If it was me implementing the thing, I would assume that holding the readlock would not prevent to acquiring the write. –  Luigi R. Viggiano Jun 3 '13 at 16:55

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