Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm having a hard time differentiating between a Chef server, workstation, client, and node. More importantly, what's their positions when setting up an initial environment? I've read countless articles and documentations, but I can't seem to understand the different roles and how they play in a completely automated setting. That is, when everything is up and running, how does one update the cookbooks and sync up all the chef managed servers?

I currently have a Chef server setup (on Ubuntu) that successfully running chef-server-webui. Do I need to use my computer as a workstation to setup the repository cookbooks, or do I need another dedicated workstation that will house the repository?

Lastly, if I want to bootstrap instances, what do I need to install on those instances? Do I need to setup chef/knife or something else?

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Well, that's the documentation in short.

  • A node is any server or virtual server that is configured to be maintained by a chef-client. A node can be physical or cloud-based. A Chef organization comprises any combination of physical and cloud-based nodes. A chef-client runs on each node. Ohai is used to collect data about the system so that it is available to the chef-client during every Chef run.
  • Workstation: A workstation is a computer that is configured to run Knife, to synchronize with the Chef repository, and interact with a single Chef Server. The workstation is the location from which most users of Chef will do most of their work..
  • The Chef Server acts as a hub for configuration data. The Chef Server stores cookbooks, the policies that are applied to cookbooks, and metadata that describes each registered node in the infrastructure. Nodes use the chef-client to ask the Chef Server for configuration details, such as recipes, templates, and file distributions. The chef-client then does as much of the configuration work as possible on the nodes themselves (and not on the Chef Server). This scalable approach distributes the configuration effort throughout the organization.

when everything is up and running, how does one update the cookbooks and sync up all the chef managed servers?

You have your cookbooks checked out locally on your PC. After changing them, you upload them to the chef-server using knife and commit the changes to the Git repo (to have a history of your changes).

Do I need to use my computer as a workstation to setup the repository cookbooks, or do I need another dedicated workstation that will house the repository?

Yes, create a client user for yourself, which is used by knife on your PC (the workstation) to talk to the server. Knife is the admin tool for chef, so you will install it only on workstations. If you want to login into the web interface, you can create a user for you, too. (the opposite of knife is chef-client, which downloads the cookbooks and executes them (and configures the node)).

if I want to bootstrap instances, what do I need to install on those instances? Do I need to setup chef/knife or something else?

The bootstrapping process installs the chef-client on the target node, copies the validator file, which allows the client to register at the chef-server and then starts the first run.

share|improve this answer
    
Do I need to install knife on my chef server? The docs are saying to run knife configure --initial but when I installed chef-server it didn't install that too. – Omar Jun 3 '13 at 20:55
    
Nope,knife is AFAIK a client-only tool. I think knife configure configures your workstation. – StephenKing Jun 4 '13 at 6:34
    
@StephenKing would it be bad practice to use a small server like say an aws micro instance as a workstation? – WhyAyala Dec 29 '15 at 20:44
    
@WhyAyala You are developing cookbooks like you developing code. There are people that like using vi over SSH, but I wouldn't recommend that. Install ChefDK locally. The only remote system that executes knife commands would be a CI server that uploads coobkooks, databags etc. after checkin to VCS. – StephenKing Dec 29 '15 at 20:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.