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i have been trying all sorts of declarations but haven't got it right,getting all sortes of errors like, syntex errors and linkig errors. this is the last attempt that made any reason to me. what am i doing wrong?

template<class T>
class Array
{
public:
class Iterator
{
public:
    friend Iterator operator+<>(const int,typename const Array<T>::Iterator&);
};
};

template <class T>
typename Array<T>::Iterator operator+(const int,typename const Array<T>::Iterator& it)
{
    return it;
}

and the main:

int main()
{
Array<int> arr;
Array<int>::Iterator it;
it=5+it;
return 0;
}

i get this error:

 error C2785: 'Array<T>::Iterator operator +(const int,const Array<T>::Iterator &)' and 'Array<T>::Iterator +(const int,const Array<T>::Iterator &)' have different return types
share|improve this question
    
void main() is not legal C++. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 3 '13 at 22:31
    
you are right ...old habits die hard. –  petric Jun 3 '13 at 22:34
4  
your right is not legal English there :P –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 3 '13 at 22:35
    
well you are right again. but can you give me some advice on my code? –  petric Jun 3 '13 at 22:37
1  
The left side of any :: is an example of what the Standard calls a "non-deduced context", meaning template arguments that appear there don't get deduced. This rule is because in general and with class template specializations, finding the correct answer could get uncomputable. –  aschepler Jun 3 '13 at 23:43
show 5 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For one thing, typename const Array<T>::Iterator is wrong. It should be const typename Array<T>::Iterator. Since typename is for helping the compiler know what to do with something after a ::, always put it immediately left of your A::B::C -type pattern.

You can't name a specialization of a function template as a friend before the general template has been declared. And you can't declare that template until the type Array<T>::Iterator has been declared.

One thing you could do: Make the entire function template a friend, not just the one specialization.

template<class T>
class Array
{
public:
    class Iterator
    {
    public:
        template <class U> friend
        typename Array<U>::Iterator operator+(
            const int, const typename Array<U>::Iterator&);
    };
};

template <class T>
typename Array<T>::Iterator operator+(
    const int, const typename Array<T>::Iterator& it)
{
    return it;
}

It's a little bit sloppy in granting friendship, but gets the job done.

Or, if you're willing to move the definition of nested class Iterator later in the file:

template<class T>
class Array
{
public:
    class Iterator;
};

template <class T>
typename Array<T>::Iterator operator+(
    const int, const typename Array<T>::Iterator& it);

template <class T>
class Array<T>::Iterator
{
public:
    friend Iterator operator+<T>(const int, const Iterator&);
};

template <class T>
typename Array<T>::Iterator operator+(
    const int, const typename Array<T>::Iterator& it)
{
    return it;
}

That takes care of how to declare and define them. Unfortunately, this operator+ is not easy to use, because of the details of template argument deduction rules....

I would probably try getting around this last issue by making Iterator a non-nested template:

namespace Array_detail {
    template <class T> class Array_Iterator;

    template <class T>
    Array_Iterator<T> operator+(int, const Array_Iterator<T>&);

    template <class T>
    class Array_Iterator {
        friend Array_Iterator operator+<>(int, const Array_Iterator&);
    };
}

template <class T>
class Array {
public:
    typedef Array_detail::Array_Iterator<T> Iterator;
};
share|improve this answer
    
thx mate! that was very helpful. one more question if you dont mind, why do you say it is hard to overload this operator? what should i do to avoid mistakes? –  petric Jun 3 '13 at 23:37
    
Added more to the answer. –  aschepler Jun 3 '13 at 23:51
    
thank you again this answers all my questions! –  petric Jun 3 '13 at 23:54
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