Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I want to do a list of concatenations in Haskell. I have [1,2,3] and [4,5,6] and i want to produce [14,15,16,24,25,26,34,35,36]. I know I can use zipWith or sth, but how to do equivalent of: foreach in first_array foreach in second_array

I guess I have to use map and half curried functions, but can't really make it alone :S

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

You could use list comprehension to do it:

[x * 10 + y | x <- [1..3], y <- [4..6]]

In fact this is a direct translation of a nested loop, since the first one is the outer / slower index, and the second one is the faster / inner index.

share|improve this answer

You can exploit the fact that lists are monads and use the do notation:

do
  a <- [1, 2, 3]
  b <- [4, 5, 6]
  return $ a * 10 + b

You can also exploit the fact that lists are applicative functors (assuming you have Control.Applicative imported):

(+) <$> (*10) <$> [1,2,3] <*> [4,5,6]

Both result in the following:

[14,15,16,24,25,26,34,35,36]
share|improve this answer

If you really like seeing for in your code you can also do something like this:

for :: [a] -> (a -> b) -> [b]
for = flip map

nested :: [Integer]
nested = concat nested_list
  where nested_list =
          for [1, 2, 3] (\i ->
            for [4, 5, 6] (\j ->
              i * 10 + j
            )
          )

You could also look into for and Identity for a more idiomatic approach.

share|improve this answer

Nested loops correspond to nested uses of map or similar functions. First approximation:

notThereYet :: [[Integer]]
notThereYet = map (\x -> map (\y -> x*10 + y) [4, 5, 6]) [1, 2, 3]

That gives you nested lists, which you can eliminate in two ways. One is to use the concat :: [[a]] -> [a] function:

solution1 :: [Integer]
solution1 = concat (map (\x -> map (\y -> x*10 + y) [4, 5, 6]) [1, 2, 3])

Another is to use this built-in function:

concatMap :: (a -> [b]) -> [a] -> [b]
concatMap f xs = concat (map f xs)

Using that:

solution2 :: [Integer]
solution2 = concatMap (\x -> map (\y -> x*10 + y) [4, 5, 6]) [1, 2, 3]

Other people have mentioned list comprehensions and the list monad, but those really bottom down to nested uses of concatMap.

share|improve this answer

Because do notation and the list comprehension have been said already. The only other option I know is via the liftM2 combinator from Control.Monad. Which is the exact same thing as the previous two.

liftM2 (\a b -> a * 10 + b) [1..3] [4..6]
share|improve this answer
    
... only shorter (than all but first). :) nicccce! –  Will Ness Oct 3 '14 at 15:58

The general solution of the concatenation of two lists of integers is this:

concatInt [] xs = xs
concatInt xs [] = xs
concatInt xs ys = [join x y | x <- xs , y <- ys ]
    where
    join x y = firstPart + secondPart
      where
      firstPart = x *  10 ^ lengthSecondPart
      lengthSecondPart = 1 + (truncate $ logBase 10 (fromIntegral y))
      secondPart = y

Example: concatInt [1,2,3] [4,5,6] == [14,15,16,24,25,26,34,35,36]

More complex example: concatInt [0,2,10,1,100,200] [24,2,999,44,3] == [24,2,999,44,3,224,22,2999,244,23,1024,102,10999,1044,103,124,12,1999,144,13,10024,1002,100999,10044,1003,20024,2002,200999,20044,2003]

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.