Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a stored proc that consists of 3 queries joined by unions. This works. It currently has an order by value set like so:

    ORDER BY [CategoryTypeID], [SortOrder], [Name]

I want to make this dynamic so i tried using a case statement like this:

    ORDER BY CASE WHEN @sort = 0 then [CategoryTypeID] ELSE [SortOrder] end

However, when i do this sql complains that order by items must appear in the select list if the statement contains union... etc

However, if i change the above to avoid using the parameter:

ORDER BY CASE WHEN 0 = 0 then [CategoryTypeID] ELSE [SortOrder] end

That works. Why is it unhappy when i use a parameter when that parameter is not actually being used in the order by? I even tried including the parameter in the select statements but it still gave me the same error.

I also tried doing case @sort when 1 etc but got the same results. And I did declare the parameter in my stored proc - @sort int = 0

This is MSSQL 2012 express

Edit - for additional clarity

 ORDER BY CASE WHEN @sort = 0 then [SortOrder] ELSE [CategoryTypeID] end

and

ORDER BY CASE WHEN @sort = 0 then [CategoryTypeID] ELSE [CategoryTypeID] end

Both of those statements fail as well with a 'must appear in the select list' error. And i was not trying to use both of those statements at the same time. Just giving them as examples that the columns themselves dont appear to be an issue. It using the parameter that appears to be an issue, even though the paramter itself is not being selected or being sorted.

share|improve this question
    
What is in your SELECT list though..? You need to actually select this. –  Ben Jun 3 '13 at 19:42
    
Because ELSE is never reached in the second case, so SQL Server acts as if it's not there. Try changing it to WHEN 1 = 0. Is SortOrder in your SELECT list? If not, why not? –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 3 '13 at 19:47
    
Sorry if i wasnt clear - if you look at the first sample line of code, that works. Meaning, all 3 of those columns are in the select. So it doesn't matter if the else is never reached or not. I could swap which column is in the else and get the same results. For some reason it just doesn't like the paramter being used –  merk Jun 4 '13 at 20:53

2 Answers 2

CASE WHEN 0 = 0 then [CategoryTypeID] ELSE [SortOrder] end is resolved at compile time and simplified to CategoryTypeID

You can do

WITH T
     AS (SELECT [CategoryTypeID],
                [SortOrder]
         FROM   T1
         UNION
         SELECT [CategoryTypeID],
                [SortOrder]
         FROM   T2)
SELECT *
FROM   T
ORDER  BY CASE
            WHEN @sort = 0 THEN [CategoryTypeID]
            ELSE [SortOrder]
          END 

Or

SELECT [CategoryTypeID],
       [SortOrder],
       CASE
         WHEN @sort = 0 THEN [CategoryTypeID]
         ELSE [SortOrder]
       END AS S
FROM   T1
UNION
SELECT [CategoryTypeID],
       [SortOrder],
       CASE
         WHEN @sort = 0 THEN [CategoryTypeID]
         ELSE [SortOrder]
       END AS S
FROM   T2
ORDER  BY S 
share|improve this answer
    
What is the point of having two identical selects in a union? –  merk Jun 5 '13 at 19:41
    
@merk - They aren't identical because they are from different tables. If you had shown more of your original query it would have been possible to make it more relevant. –  Martin Smith Jun 5 '13 at 22:12
    
Ah sorry, i missed the T1 vs T2 bit. –  merk Jun 6 '13 at 22:45

AFAICT SQL Server doesn't support statements like that, as the error indicates. You can use an IF construct to give different sorting based on a parameter.

IF @sort=0
    SELECT ... ORDER BY CategoryTypeID;
ELSE
    SELECT ... ORDER BY SortOrder;
share|improve this answer
    
I can't comment on the other person's answer... but whatever you do DO NOT USE WITH EVER! Unless you use it for recursive problems and you don't see any other way to solve the recursive problems. –  TT. Jun 3 '13 at 19:57
    
You can comment on other people's answers once you have 50 rep. +1 as dividing into two queries may well give a better plan than a catch all query if indexes exist to support the sort. I disagree with the statement whatever you do DO NOT USE WITH EVER though. What are you basing that on? –  Martin Smith Jun 3 '13 at 20:01
    
Also, Martin Smiths version selects an extra column for the sake of sorting on it. The IF construct is more typing (copy/paste of course) but at least it doesn't select an extra column that you do not need. OTOH if you change/update the query you will have to retype (copy/paste of course) to the ELSE part. –  TT. Jun 3 '13 at 20:04
    
The second version in my answer does just because they mentioned "I even tried including the parameter in the select statements" to show this was possible. Still waiting on the rationale for your avsersion to WITH –  Martin Smith Jun 3 '13 at 20:06
    
Personal experience. Absolute bad performance. Had colleagues unaware of this asking me why their query needed 11 (eleven) hours to run. They were using WITH. Changed to derived tables, query ran in mere seconds. That was on SQL Server 2008. The tables in the WITH clause are reevaluated each time they are needed in the query... it is a (table) expression, not a derived table. –  TT. Jun 3 '13 at 20:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.