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I'm working with Hibernate and I'd like to be able to create a many-to-many-to-many relationship. The current scenario being: -

A band may play at many venues and a venue may have many bands.

BAND >------< VENUE

This would constitute as a many to many relationship, so I use a join table, such as: -

BAND ----< BAND_VENUES >---- VENUE

I am capable of creating this using both hibernate or SQL; see the test case: -

@Entity
@Table(name = "Band")
public class Band implements Serializable,
{
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(generator = "bandId" )
    @GenericGenerator(name = "bandId", strategy = "uuid2")
    private String bandId;

    @ManyToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    @JoinTable(name = "Band_Venues",
    joinColumns =  
    {
        @JoinColumn(name = "bandId")
    },
    inverseJoinColumns = 
    {
        @JoinColumn(name = "venueId")
    })
}

and

@Entity
@Table(name = "Venue")
public class Venue implements Serializable
{
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(generator = "venueId" )
    @GenericGenerator(name = "venueId", strategy = "uuid2")
    private String venueId;
}

This seems very simple and makes sense to me.

Where I get confused is if I add another many to many relationship using the following scenario.

A band may play at many venues at different date/times, so: -

BAND ----< GIG_DATES >-----< GIG_DATES_VENUES >---- VENUE

Is what I believe the relationship should be however using hibernate, I don't actually have a mapping for 'BAND_VENUES' so how do I go about creating the relationship?

I am using annotations and not a mapping file

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure if this is what you like to hear but I'd approach this slightly differently.

Doesn't a band play at a venue at a particular date/time?

Hence, I'd conceptually "extend" the initial BAND_VENUES join table from

BAND ----< BAND_VENUES >---- VENUE

and add a time stamp to it.

This naturally leads to a new entity GIG which replaces the (anonymous) BAND_VENUES join table. It has a

  • many-to-one relationship to BAND
  • many-to-one relationship to VENUE
  • timestamp
  • ...
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I see, so does the date/time then become part of the composite key? Otherwise I assume that a band could only ever play at a venue once –  chrisw69 Jun 3 '13 at 20:13
    
yes, that's correct –  Marcel Stör Jun 3 '13 at 20:14
    
The answer provided has solved my problem so I'm marking this as the correct answer as it was answered first –  chrisw69 Jun 3 '13 at 20:17
2  
You'd better treat the new Gig entity as all the other entities: assign it an auto-generated, single-column ID. Add a unique constraint on the three other fields if you want, but single-column, autogenerated keys are cleaner, more efficient, ans easier to use. And that allows changing the date of a gig, which wouldn't be possible if the date was part of the PK. –  JB Nizet Jun 3 '13 at 20:20
    
yes, that's certainly better...I should have included this in my comment, sry –  Marcel Stör Jun 3 '13 at 20:22
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On the moment when many-to-many relationship gets attributes, it is not relationship anymore. Relationships do not have attributes in JPA, entities do.

Such a "relationship with attributes" is modeled as an intermediate entity which will have many-to-one relationship to original entities, in this case to Band and to Venue. It goes roughly as follows:

@Entity
@IdClass(GigId.class)
public class Gig {
    @Id
    @ManyToOne
    private Band band
    @Id
    @ManyToOne
    private Venue venue;

}

public class GigId implements Serializable{
    private String band;

    private String venue;
    ...
    //date
}

public class Band { ..
    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "band")
    private Collection<Gig> gigs;
    ...
}

public class Venue {..
   @OneToMany(mappedBy = "venue")
   private Collection<Gig> gigs;
   ...
}
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I see, so does the date/time then become part of the composite key? Otherwise I assume that a band could only ever play at a venue once –  chrisw69 Jun 3 '13 at 20:13
    
Yes, exactly right. –  Mikko Maunu Jun 3 '13 at 20:15
    
I appreciate your answer, I've given it +1 however the answer by Marcel Stör is the same and helped just as much and since he posted first I'm marking his as the correct answer :-( –  chrisw69 Jun 3 '13 at 20:18
    
+1 for this part: On the moment when many-to-many relationship gets attributes, it is not relationship anymore. Relationships do not have attributes in JPA, entities do. This is a key part that they accepted answer does not have. –  ArtB Jun 3 '13 at 20:22
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I agree with Marcel (he beat me to it but I already had this written). By making a 'join' table called Performance, you basically have the same thing. (Excuse my pseudo code) Roughly something like:

@Entity
class Band 
{
   @OneToMany
   Performance performance;
}

@Entity   
class Performance
{  
   @ManyToOne
   Band band;
   @OneToOne (or many to many is sometimes easier to work with)
   Venue Venue;
   Date date;
}

@Entity
class Venue {
   String address;
}
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Thanks for your input –  chrisw69 Jun 3 '13 at 20:20
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