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I'm working on Project Euler number 5. I've not Googled, as that will typically lead to a SO with the answer. So, this is what I've got:

    private int Euler5(int dividend, int divisor)
    {
        if (divisor < 21)
        {
            // if it equals zero, move to the next divisor
            if (dividend % divisor == 0) 
            {
                divisor++;
                return Euler5(dividend, divisor);
            }
            else
            {
                dividend++;
                return Euler5(dividend, 1); // move to the dividend
            }
        }
        // oh hey, the divisor is above 20, so what's the dividend
        return dividend; 
    }

In my mind, this makes sense. Yet VS2012 is giving me a StackOverFlowException suggesting I make sure I'm not in an infinite loop or using recursion. My question is, why is this an infinite loop? I've a feeling I'm missing something completely silly.

EDIT

Since people seem to keep posting them, I'll reiterate the fact that I didn't use Google for fear of stumbling on the answer. I don't want the answer to the problem. I only wanted to know why I was getting the exception.

share|improve this question
3  
It's possible that you're just blowing the stack even without infinite recursion. A lot of those problems are specifically designed to be large enough that your code needs to scale reasonably well. You probably just want to use a non-recursive approach here and refactor it into a loop. – Servy Jun 3 '13 at 20:05
    
@Servy: Seems I have a bit more to learn about the stack and how it works. Thanks. – MyCodeSucks Jun 3 '13 at 20:21
    
This would still cause the stack overflow, but when you restart, you don't need to check divisor of 1, all integers are divisable by 1 already. You can also increment your dividend by 2 (or even 10). Just a couple tips when you change to a loop – Cemafor Jun 3 '13 at 20:26
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Of course this kind of logic is going to blow the stack. Think about this, if you were to implement this logic to solve the problem of finding the smallest number evenly divisible by 1--10, you'd be at least 2520 calls deep in the stack, per the problem statement:

2520 is the smallest number that can be divided by each of the numbers from 1 to 10 without any remainder.

For 1--20, the answer is obviously much larger and it's not surprising at all that you're blowing the stack. You should find a non-recursive solution.

My question is, why is this an infinite loop?

It's not. The stack is limited in size. You're making too many recursive calls and eventually breaching the maximum stack size.

I've a feeling I'm missing something completely silly.

You came to the right place.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, well, there's that. I was unaware that having too many calls on the stack could cause issues. I'd never done anything remotely close to this. But now it makes a bit of sense. – MyCodeSucks Jun 3 '13 at 20:20
    
@CL4PTR4P: Yup. That's basically what a stack overflow is. The stack has limited size. Too many function calls down the stack and you'll have a hull breach. – jason Jun 3 '13 at 20:23

+1 for Jason's answer, which clearly explains the problem.

Now for some solution! I know at least of three ways to remove recursion from an algorithm:

  1. Find a purely iterative algorithm instead (which can be difficult for some problems);
  2. Transform the recursive algorithm into a similar one with a loop and use a Stack<T> (or some kind of list) to store the equivalent of the call stack. This has similar space requirement as the original one, but the heap can grow much bigger than the stack!
  3. A special family of recursive algorithms are tail-recursive. Those can easily mechanically be changed to never overflow the stack. You're lucky, it's your case!

An algorithm is tail-recursive if all its recursive calls are tail-calls, which means they are the last thing done before returning. If it's unclear to you, lookup better examples with Google.

Such algorithms can easily be transformed by adjusting the parameters and using a goto rather than a real call. Look at your example again:

private int Euler5(int dividend, int divisor)
{
    tail_call:
    if (divisor < 21)
    {
        // if it equals zero, move to the next divisor
        if (dividend % divisor == 0) 
        {
            divisor++;
            goto tail_call; // return Eular5(dividend, divisor);
        }
        else
        {
            dividend++;
            // return Eular5(dividend, 1); // move to the dividend
            divisor = 1;
            goto tail_call;
        }
    }
    // oh hey, the divisor is above 20, so what's the dividend
    return dividend; 
}

Oh hey! It's exactly the same function, but with a fixed stack size (there's no call, only jumps). Now some would say: "Ugh... gotos! They are evil! Die goto, die!". I'd say this is one of the few legitimate uses. After all if your compiler was smart enough, it would do the tail-call optimization itself (F# actually does, C# does not, the JIT might do it on x64, not on x86).

But for those people I'd say: look a little better. Because there is a goto at the end of each if/else branch, I can move it outside of the "if" completely. Now I have something like "start: if (X) { Y(); goto start; }" Think about it, it's just a "while(X) Y()" loop. So you just found the iterative version of your function:

private int Euler5(int dividend, int divisor)
{
    while (divisor < 21)
    {
        // if it equals zero, move to the next divisor
        if (dividend % divisor == 0) 
        {
            divisor++;
        }
        else
        {
            dividend++;
            divisor = 1;
        }
    }
    // oh hey, the divisor is above 20, so what's the dividend
    return dividend; 
}

Nice!

share|improve this answer
    
I was NOT asking for a solution to the problem. – MyCodeSucks Jun 3 '13 at 21:06
    
Sorry about that. I didn't try to solve the Project Euler problem, just tried to show how recursivity can be handled. Actually, the code I've posted is derived 100% from your code and if there is any mistakes in it they are still there; because I didn't even check if the behavior was correct with respect to the Euler problem. At least I clearly stated what I was about to write so I hope you could skip spoilers... – jods Jun 3 '13 at 23:14
    
But even removing the recursivity isn't what I was looking for. – MyCodeSucks Jun 4 '13 at 15:04

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