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I just solved a fun little practice problem with basically boils down to this:

int [] array = new int [10];
int i = 0;
try{
  while (true){

     array[i++] = 10;

  }
}
catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e){ 
   for(i = 0; i < 10; i++){
      System.out.println(array[i]);
   }
}

How evil is this? Goto evil? Lots of Global Variables evil? or is this totally fine?

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5  
Why not use a for loop? –  LiverpoolFTW Jun 3 '13 at 21:45
    
You should use exceptions as normal behavior when the exception is part of the normal behavior of the application e.g. having a EOFExceiption when reading a file where you don't know the number of entries. In this case, it shows a bad design. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 3 '13 at 21:46
1  
I wouldn't call it evil per se, just stupid. I mean GOTO at least could be useful, but this is just obfuscation for no reason. –  Approaching Darkness Fish Jun 3 '13 at 21:47
    
@LiverpoolFTW its more a question of theory at this point but looking back, you're right, that would probably be a better choice. –  Daniel Jun 3 '13 at 21:47
1  
"How evil is this?" It is very evil because it's not readable at all. By reading your code I cannot figure out what the intention is. –  Bhesh Gurung Jun 3 '13 at 22:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Exception handling is tremendously expensive in terms of performance (and somewhat expensive in terms of memory). As a general rule, you should always prefer other techniques where possible.

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Expensive in terms of memory? Sorry, but I don't think 4KB of RAM (or around that amount) can compare to 2GB of data in arrays/maps. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 3 '13 at 21:48
    
@LuiggiMendoza that's a false choice though, you don't have to choose one or the other –  matt b Jun 3 '13 at 21:55
    
This seems like the weakest reason to avoid this code. Even if try/catch was faster than for loops, there's reasons you shouldn't use exception handling for flow control. –  Daniel Kaplan Jun 3 '13 at 21:57
    
@mattb never said it wasn't a false choice. It would always depend on design. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 3 '13 at 22:04
    
@tieTYT using exceptions as part of the application behavior is not always a wrong choice. For example, there's a system X (that you cannot modify) that generates files wich unknown number of registers and you must consume them in your Java app. Since you don't know the number of registers to process by any means and you can't change that app, the only thing you can do to know where you can't read any more data is through a EOFException. As said in my comment on OP's question, using an exception in this case just shows a bad design. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 3 '13 at 22:06

Here are some possible ways to do it without try catch:

First

int [] array = new int [10];  
int i = 0;  

while(i<10){  
  array[i]=(i+1);  
  System.out.println(array[i]);  
  i++;
}  

Second

int [] array = new int [10];

for(int i=0; i<array.length; i++){
  array[i]=(i+1);
  System.out.println(array[i]);
}

What I mean is, if it's not really necessary to use try catch, don't! Try catch only supposed to prevent user error (usually in my program), or unless the program ask you to use it.

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1  
The First never increments i; it's infinite –  Craig Jun 3 '13 at 21:55
    
oopps, I forgot to add increment hhehe :) –  A-SM Jun 3 '13 at 21:56

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