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How do I write a decorator that restores the current working directory to what it was before the decorated function was called? In other words, if I use the decorator on a function that does an os.chdir(), the cwd will not be changed after the function is called.

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And you asked the question and answered it yourself in 3 minutes because…? Obviously you had the answer (which hardly can be improved) even before asking the question. I'd really like to know your reasoning. –  tzot Oct 3 '08 at 22:37
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FAQ says "It's also perfectly fine to ask and answer your own programming question". It lists three required criteria for questions, and "you don't know the answer" isn't one of them. –  Steve Jessop Oct 3 '08 at 22:56
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I had written the code and then it turned out (after refactoring) that I didn't need it. I figured stackoverflow is a good place to archive it, and perhaps others can benefit. –  Daryl Spitzer Oct 3 '08 at 23:31
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I think the "Jeopardy" comment is just supposed to mean the title should still be "how do I write a decorator for X?", not "here's useful decorator for X". I agree that a note in the question would save people wasting time on duplicate solutions while you're typing. But they might better yours... –  Steve Jessop Oct 4 '08 at 14:33
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Well I'm glad I asked the question, because codeape improved upon my answer, and ΤΖΩΤΖΙΟΥ came up with a context manager which didn't occur to me. –  Daryl Spitzer Oct 8 '08 at 0:49
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The path.py module (which you really should use if dealing with paths in python scripts) has a context manager:

subdir = d / 'subdir' #subdir is a path object, in the path.py module
with subdir:
  # here current dir is subdir

#not anymore

(credits goes to this blog post from Roberto Alsina)

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If path.py is now built-in, perhaps you should answer stackoverflow.com/questions/3899761/…;. –  Daryl Spitzer Dec 27 '12 at 0:50
    
unfortunately it isn't, but thanks I wasn't aware of the question –  CharlesB Dec 27 '12 at 5:24
    
I guess I misinterpreted your answer. Did you mean that the context manager is built in to path.py? (I thought you meant path.py is now built in to Python.) –  Daryl Spitzer Dec 27 '12 at 18:05
    
yes that's what I meant I clarified the post –  CharlesB Dec 27 '12 at 19:24
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The answer for a decorator has been given; it works at the function definition stage as requested.

With Python 2.5+, you also have an option to do that at the function call stage using a context manager:

from __future__ import with_statement # needed for 2.5 ≤ Python < 2.6
import contextlib, os

@contextlib.contextmanager
def remember_cwd():
    curdir= os.getcwd()
    try: yield
    finally: os.chdir(curdir)

which can be used if needed at the function call time as:

print "getcwd before:", os.getcwd()
with remember_cwd():
    walk_around_the_filesystem()
print "getcwd after:", os.getcwd()

It's a nice option to have.

EDIT: I added error handling as suggested by codeape. Since my answer has been voted up, it's fair to offer a complete answer, all other issues aside.

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And it can be used to write the aforementioned decorator :) –  Constantin Oct 3 '08 at 23:25
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Needs error handling, see my answer. –  codeape Oct 4 '08 at 11:30
    
Does the error handling need an explicit try/finally? I thought the point of context managers was that MANAGER.__exit__ was always called. But then, I have never tried the decorator from contextlib, so I don't know what the issues are. –  Adrian Ratnapala Oct 21 '11 at 6:22
    
No, it doesn't need an explicit try/finally, but you most probably want a try/except clause to handle failures. –  tzot Oct 21 '11 at 7:47
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The given answers fail to take into account that the wrapped function may raise an exception. In that case, the directory will never be restored. The code below adds exception handling to the previous answers.


def preserve_cwd(function):
   def decorator(*args, **kwargs):
      cwd = os.getcwd()
      try:
          return function(*args, **kwargs)
      finally:
          os.chdir(cwd)
   return decorator

@contextlib.contextmanager
def remember_cwd():
    curdir = os.getcwd()
    try:
        yield
    finally:
        os.chdir(curdir)

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def preserve_cwd(function):
   def decorator(*args, **kwargs):
      cwd = os.getcwd()
      result = function(*args, **kwargs)
      os.chdir(cwd)
      return result
   return decorator

Here's how it's used:

@preserve_cwd
def test():
  print 'was:',os.getcwd()
  os.chdir('/')
  print 'now:',os.getcwd()

>>> print os.getcwd()
/Users/dspitzer
>>> test()
was: /Users/dspitzer
now: /
>>> print os.getcwd()
/Users/dspitzer
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2  
Needs error handling, see my answer. –  codeape Oct 4 '08 at 11:31
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