Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So the file is like this: tucanos 10 tacobell 5 tucanos 5 pizzahut 15 tucanos 5 pizzahut 2 tucanos 5

Where the string is the restaurant's name and the number is the number of likes it has. I am supposed to find out the sum of number of likes for each restaurant from reading the file but I have no idea how to do it. Does any of you have any hints for me?

share|improve this question
5  
Go to google & type in "C++ file io". –  Luchian Grigore Jun 3 '13 at 22:49
    
where is google? since you went there and typed this I assume, why didn't you just put result here? aaaa, to make things more difficult, OK I see –  AB_ Jun 19 '13 at 2:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

first, here is nice function to split std::string into std::vector given a delimiter character:

std::vector<std::string> &split(const std::string &s, 
    char delim, std::vector<std::string> &elems) {
        std::stringstream ss(s);
        std::string item;
        while (std::getline(ss, item, delim)) {
            elems.push_back(item);
        }
        return elems;
}

next, we can achieve desired result using this code:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    std::map<std::string, int> map;
    std::ifstream file("file_with_string.txt", std::ifstream::in);
    std::string temp;
    while (std::getline(file, temp)) {
        std::cout << temp << "\n";
        std::vector<std::string> tokens;
        tokens = split(temp, ' ', tokens);

        for (std::vector<std::string>::iterator it = tokens.begin(); 
             it != tokens.end(); it++) {
            std::vector<std::string>::iterator it1 = it;
            std::map<std::string, int>::iterator mapIt = map.find(*it++);
            int number;
            std::istringstream(*it) >> number;
            if (mapIt != map.end()) {
                (mapIt->second) += (number);
            } else {
                map[*it1] = number;
            }

        }
    }

    for (std::map<std::string, int>::iterator it = map.begin(); 
         it != map.end(); it++) {
        std::cout << it->first << " " << it->second << "\n";
    }
    return 0;
}

tucanos 10 tacobell 5 tucanos 5 pizzahut 15 tucanos 5 pizzahut 2 tucanos 5

pizzahut 17

tacobell 5

tucanos 25

RUN SUCCESSFUL (total time: 55ms)


we can make it simpler

    std::map<std::string, int> map;
    std::ifstream infile("file_with_string.txt",std::ifstream::in);

    std::string resturant = "";
    int likes = 0;

    while(infile >> resturant >> likes ){
            map[resturant ] += likes ;
    }

but first version gives more insight IMO into iterators, how to traverse std::map, std::vector and how populate map.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But it seems like the code is only usable when we know what is in the text? Sorry but I am very new to C++. Does the code still work fine if the text is unknown? As in you don't know how many lines there are, how many restaurants there are,etc. –  Ken Yoo Ho Jun 4 '13 at 0:20
    
yes. the only condition is there is convention preserved: name value –  AB_ Jun 4 '13 at 1:02

Here's some pseudocode:

Open file
For each restaurant-likes pair
    Read restaurant-likes pair from file
    If first time we've seen a restaurant
        Add restaurant to list
    Lookup restaurant in list and add likes to total for that restaurant
End For
Close file

Print all restarants and total likes
share|improve this answer
    
sorry for asking another stupid question. I am thinking of using find function to find the restaurant-likes pair, but it doesn't seem to work because I don't know how many lines are there in the text. Are there any way for me to use vectors to allow for an arbitrary number of restaurant? Thanks a lot –  Ken Yoo Ho Jun 3 '13 at 23:10
    
Certainly. std::vector, for example. –  John Jun 3 '13 at 23:12

Use fscanf to parse the input from file and then apply the add operation. Example

share|improve this answer
// c:\temp\nameofexecutable.exe < yourtextfile.txt

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;
int main()
{
    string              resturant; 
    int                 likes;
    map<string, int>    likesCount;

    while (cin >> resturant >> likes) {
        likesCount[resturant] += likes;
    }

    for_each(begin(likesCount), end(likesCount),  [&](pair<string,int> x){
        cout << x.first << " " << x.second << endl;
    }); 

    //// using plain for instead of std::for_each 
    //for (auto i = begin(likesCount); i != end(likesCount); i++)   {
    //  cout << i->first << " " << i->second << endl;
    //}


}
share|improve this answer
    
the for_each is not defined. How can I fix that? –  Ken Yoo Ho Jun 3 '13 at 23:15
    
for_each is in <algorithm> header... what compiler/ide are you using? –  salek Jun 3 '13 at 23:18
    
seen the update? instead of for_each/lambda you can use the for loop as well (the bit that is commented out) –  salek Jun 4 '13 at 0:20
    
yes I saw it. Thanks a lot! –  Ken Yoo Ho Jun 4 '13 at 0:54
    
so accept the answer then? –  salek Jun 4 '13 at 1:30

maybe can help you:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iterator>

int
main() {
        std::map<std::string, int> count;
        std::ifstream infile("cars.dat", std::ios::in);

        if (infile == NULL) {
                fprintf(stderr, "Failed to open file.\n");
                exit(-1);
        }
        std::string resturant = "";
        int likes = 0;

        while(infile >> resturant >> likes ){
                count[resturant ] += likes ;
        }

        printf("--------------------each sum-------------------\n");
        std::map<std::string, int>::iterator it(count.begin());
        for (; it != sum.end(); ) {
                printf("%s %d\n", (it->first).c_str(),it->second);
                it++;
        }
        infile.close();
        return 0;

}

The result: --------------------each sum------------------- pizzahut 17 tacobell 5 tucanos 25

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But it seems like the code is only usable when we know what is in the text? Sorry but I am very new to C++. Does the code still work fine if the text is unknown? As in you don't know how many lines there are, how many restaurants there are,etc. –  Ken Yoo Ho Jun 4 '13 at 0:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.