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This is call for help with HW task in Data Science course I am doing on Coursera, since I could not get any advice on Coursera forum. I've made my code, but unfortunately the output does not return expected result. Here's the problem at hand:

Task: Implement a relational join as a MapReduce query

Input (Mapper):

The input will be database records formatted as lists of Strings. Every list element corresponds to a different field in it’s corresponding record. The first item(index 0) in each record is a string that identifies which table the record originates from. This field has two possible values:

  1. ‘line_item’ indicates that the record is a line item. 2.‘order’ indicates that the record is an order.

The second element(index 1) in each record is the order_id. LineItem records have 17 elements including the identifier string. Order records have 10 elements including the identifier string.

Output (Reducer):

The output should be a joined record.

The result should be a single list of length 27 that contains the fields from the order record followed by the fields from the line item record. Each list element should be a string.

My code is:

import MapReduce
import sys

"""
Word Count Example in the Simple Python MapReduce Framework
"""

mr = MapReduce.MapReduce()

# =============================
# Do not modify above this line

record = open(sys.argv[1]) # this read input, given by instructor

def mapper(record):
key = record[1] # assign order_id from each record as key
value = list(record) # assign whole record as value for each key
mr.emit_intermediate(key, value) # emit key-value pairs

def reducer(key, value):
    new_dict = {} # create dict to keep track of records
    if not key in new_dict:
        new_dict[key] = value
    else:
        new_dict[key].extend(value)
    for key in new_dict:
        if len(new_dict[key]) == 27:
            mr.emit(new_dict[key])

# Do not modify below this line
# =============================
if __name__ == '__main__':
  inputdata = open(sys.argv[1])
  mr.execute(inputdata, mapper, reducer)

The error message I am getting is "Expected: 31 records, got 0".

Also, expected output records should like like this - just one list with all records lumped together, w/o any de-duplication.

["order", "5", "44485", "F", "144659.20", "1994-07-30", "5-LOW", "Clerk#000000925", "0", "quickly. bold deposits sleep slyly. packages use slyly", "line_item", "5", "37531", "35", "3", "50", "73426.50", "0.08", "0.03", "A", "F", "1994-08-08", "1994-10-13", "1994-08-26", "DELIVER IN PERSON", "AIR", "eodolites. fluffily unusual"]

Sorry for the long questions, and it amy be a bit of a mess, but I hope the answer will be obvious to someone.

Similar code which worked for me:

def mapper(record):
    # key: document identifier
    # value: document contents
    friend = record[0]
    value = 1
    mydict = {}
    mr.emit_intermediate(friend, value)
    mydict[friend] = int(value)


def reducer(friend, value):
    # key: word
    # value: list of occurrence counts
    newdict = {}
    if not friend in newdict:
        newdict[friend] = value
    else:
    newdict[friend] = newdict[friend] + 1
    for friend in newdict:
    mr.emit((friend, (newdict[friend])))

Thanks! Sergey

share|improve this question
    
The code snippet looks incomplete. It begins with an indented line defining record, and there are references to mr, but that item (module? class instance?) isn't previously mentioned. There's also no indication of how you use this code, though the first line leads me to think you're calling it from the command line with arguments. If that's the case, then how do the functions get called? If you could share more details about that, as well as an example of the input data, it would help clarify the situation. –  Justin S Barrett Jun 3 '13 at 23:36
    
Thanks Justin! I added missing parts of code at the beginning and the end. They are just imports, but these are not likely the parts which cause problem, since it worked in other problems for me. Best! –  Sergey Samusev Jun 4 '13 at 7:48
    
Which line is generating the error message? Can you post the full traceback? I have a hunch that I know what's wrong, but I feel the traceback will still help. –  Justin S Barrett Jun 4 '13 at 23:52
    
@JustinSBarrett Unfortunately this is all the information I have about error, since I am working on Course VM and I am only getting response after uploading Python file with my doce. But judging from the response, I think issues is somewhere in the reduce function, which does not return right output. Thanks! –  Sergey Samusev Jun 8 '13 at 14:15

2 Answers 2

Actually you do not have to use new_dict. Since you have to print the "join" and you know that the orders is always in index 0 in your values list, and the rest of the list are the line_item this code should do it:

import MapReduce
import sys

"""
Word Count Example in the Simple Python MapReduce Framework
"""

mr = MapReduce.MapReduce()

# =============================
# Do not modify above this line

def mapper(record):
    key = record[1] # assign order_id from each record as key
    value = list(record) # assign whole record as value for each key
    mr.emit_intermediate(key, value) # emit key-value pairs

def reducer(key, value):
    for index in range (1, len(value)):
        mr.emit(value[0] + value[index])

# Do not modify below this line
# =============================
if __name__ == '__main__':
  inputdata = open(sys.argv[1])
  mr.execute(inputdata, mapper, reducer)
share|improve this answer

I see a couple things amiss with this code. First is this line:

record = open(sys.argv[1])

I find it odd that this record variable is never used anywhere else in the code. Even though the mapper function is defined as follows:

def mapper(record):
    ...

...that record is local to the mapper function. It's in a different scope than the first record. Whatever data is passed to mapper is assigned to its local record and used accordingly, and the file object assigned to the first record is never touched. I don't feel that this is tied to the error, though. Because that first record is not used anywhere else, you can pretty safely delete that line.

Then there's the reducer function:

def reducer(key, value): # reducer should take 2 inputs according to the task
    if key in new_dict: # checking if key already added to dict
        new_dict[key].extend(list(value)) # if yes just append all records to the value
    new_dict[key] = list(value) # if not create new key and assign record to value
    for key in new_dict:
        if len(new_dict[key]) == 27: # checks to emit only records found in both tables
            mr.emit(new_dict[key])

Your own comments offer the clue to the problem here. First you say you're checking to see if the key is already in the dict. If so, just append all records to the value. If not, create a new key and assign the record to the value.

The problem is with the line associated with the "if not" comment. If it's truly what should be done if the first if test fails, then it should be prefaced by an else line:

    ...
    if key in new_dict: # checking if key already added to dict
        new_dict[key].extend(list(value)) # if yes just append all records to the value
    else:
        new_dict[key] = list(value) # if not create new key and assign record to value
    ...

The way you wrote it, even if that if test succeeds and it appends the data to the existing value for the key, it's going to immediately stomp over that change. In other words, the value for that key isn't going to grow. It's always going to represent the most recently submitted value for the key.

Here's the full code edited with all the suggested changes:

import MapReduce
import sys

"""
Word Count Example in the Simple Python MapReduce Framework
"""

mr = MapReduce.MapReduce()

# =============================
# Do not modify above this line

def mapper(record):
    key = record[1] # assign order_id from each record as key
    value = list(record) # assign whole record as value for each key
    mr.emit_intermediate(key, value) # emit key-value pairs

new_dict = {} # create dict to keep track of records

def reducer(key, value):
    if not key in new_dict:
        new_dict[key] = value
    else:
        new_dict[key].extend(value)
    for key in new_dict:
        if len(new_dict[key]) == 27:
            mr.emit(new_dict[key])

# Do not modify below this line
# =============================
if __name__ == '__main__':
  inputdata = open(sys.argv[1])
  mr.execute(inputdata, mapper, reducer)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing to my error with missing else statement. I have fixed that as you instructed. Alas, I am still getting the same error. I thought it may be because of my conditions (if len(new_dict[key]) == 27), so I removed that, but program still return 0 values. For comparison, I am also posting code for similar task, which worked well for me, see my next comment below. –  Sergey Samusev Jun 9 '13 at 21:56
    
Oops, I actually could not post code as comment, so I added that at the end of my initial problem description. Thanks again Justin! –  Sergey Samusev Jun 9 '13 at 21:58
    
I just edited my answer to add a response regarding the new code. Perhaps that solves the problem? –  Justin S Barrett Jun 9 '13 at 23:03
    
Well, in this task I only emit value, without key, because this is what is requested in the problem: "The result should be a single list of length 27 that contains the fields from the order record followed by the fields from the line item record. Each list element should be a string." That's a quote from my task definition above. The problem here seem to be the fact that as of now, my reducer function producer 0 outputs, where's it's expected to produce some.. Justin, thanks for looking into this with me. Let me know if you'll have more ideas. At least I am learning on the way :) –  Sergey Samusev Jun 9 '13 at 23:15
    
I just noticed that you moved the initialization of new_dict inside the reducer function. This will definitely cause things to fail, because you'll be starting over with an empty dictionary every time that function is called. –  Justin S Barrett Jun 9 '13 at 23:30

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