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I am using g++ on CodeBlocks 10.05 on Debian 7.0.0.

Back in the 90s, I wrote the following function to reverse the byte order in 4 byte integers.

/*******************************/
 void ByteSwapInt(int *ipInteger)
/*******************************/
 {
    int iBuffer;

    _swab( (char *)ipInteger, (char *)&iBuffer, 4 );
    swaw((char *)&iBuffer, (char *)ipInteger, 4);
 }

Up until recently, it has worked. But I notice that swaw no longer appear to do anything. I checked what was going on by making arrays of the individual bytes in *ipInteger and iBuffer by expanding the above function thus

/*******************************/
 void ByteSwapInt(int *ipInteger)
/*******************************/
 {
     int iBuffer;
     int Int[4], Buf[4];

    (Int[0]) = (*ipInteger >> 24) & 0xff;  // high-order (leftmost) byte: bits 24-31
    (Int[1]) = (*ipInteger >> 16) & 0xff;  // next byte, counting from left: bits 16-23
    (Int[2]) = (*ipInteger >>  8) & 0xff;  // next byte, bits 8-15
    (Int[3]) = *ipInteger         & 0xff;

    _swab( (char *)ipInteger, (char *)&iBuffer, 4 );
    (Buf[0]) = (iBuffer >> 24) & 0xff;  // high-order (leftmost) byte: bits 24-31
    (Buf[1]) = (iBuffer >> 16) & 0xff;  // next byte, counting from left: bits 16-23
    (Buf[2]) = (iBuffer >>  8) & 0xff;  // next byte, bits 8-15
    (Buf[3]) = iBuffer         & 0xff;
    swaw((char *)&iBuffer, (char *)ipInteger, 4);
    (Int[0]) = (*ipInteger >> 24) & 0xff;  // high-order (leftmost) byte: bits 24-31
    (Int[1]) = (*ipInteger >> 16) & 0xff;  // next byte, counting from left: bits 16-23
    (Int[2]) = (*ipInteger >>  8) & 0xff;  // next byte, bits 8-15
    (Int[3]) = *ipInteger         & 0xff;
 }

The content of *ipInteger does not change. I tried unsiccessfully to find swaw, for swapping words, on google. Is it deprecated?

share|improve this question
    
It's certainly not in glibc. I'm not sure whether anyone can tell you if a function from a library you don't even remember is deprecated or not. – millimoose Jun 4 '13 at 1:54
    
Welcome to the future: fortunately they still haven't killed swab see codecogs.com/reference/computing/c/string.h/swab.php – Mikhail Jun 4 '13 at 1:59
    
Thank you for your replies. I found a relatively simple fix in my answer. I thought swaw was in unistd.h man "man swaw" returned no results on the Linux that came with Debian 7.0.0. I think it was still available in Ubuntu 11. – OtagoHarbour Jun 4 '13 at 2:18
    
Google finds no evidence it ever existed, so it must be deprecated? Imagine if deprecations worked that well. – Wumpus Q. Wumbley Jun 4 '13 at 2:47
1  
Swaw() was a Novell Netware helper function. Yup, time has not been kind to Netware, version 4 was a major mess. Doc is here. Note that it swapped words, 16-bit values. – Hans Passant Jun 4 '13 at 3:14

For networking you want htonl, htons and their companions ntohl and ntohs, being host-to-network and network-to-host transforms for 32-bit and 16-bit integers. These will be defined appropriately for the architecture you're on. Thus on SPARC they'd be a no-op (a big-endian platform) and on x86 they are implemented as swaps. They're from <arpa/inet.h> or <netinet/in.h>

share|improve this answer

The easiest solution I found was to use FIX_INT(x) described here.

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