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I'm trying to create a function to deal out cards from a deck in javascript but when I create a parameter for future object properties in my deal function it returns the property as undefined. Why is this happening?

//Creates the deck
var deck = Math.ceil(Math.random() * 52) + 1;
var Ace = 1;
var Face = 10;
if (deck % 13 == 1) {
deck = Ace;
} else if (deck % 13 === 11 || deck % 13 === 12 || deck % 13 === 0) {
    deck = Face;
} else if (deck % 13 === 2) {
    deck = 2;
} else if (deck % 13 === 3) {
    deck = 3;
} else if (deck % 13 === 4) {
    deck = 4;
} else if (deck % 13 === 5) {
    deck = 5;
} else if (deck % 13 === 6) {
    deck = 6;
} else if (deck % 13 === 7) {
    deck = 7;
} else if (deck % 13 === 8) {
    deck = 8;
} else if (deck % 13 === 9) {
    deck = 9;
} else {
    deck = 10;
}
//Creates the player as an object
function Player(pcard1) {
    pcard1 = pcard1;
}
//Deals a random card out of the deck
var deal = function (pob) {
    pob = deck;
};
deal(Player.pcard1);
alert(Player.pcard1);
share|improve this question
    
what do you mean by Player.pcard1.... it's worth posting full code.. –  pinkpanther Jun 4 '13 at 4:51
    
This is the full code as of now, Player is the object and pcard1 is the Player's 1st card as a property. –  user2449973 Jun 4 '13 at 4:55
    
where did you declare Player object?...in any way see my answer –  pinkpanther Jun 4 '13 at 5:00
    
You should read up on OO JavaScript. You are not doing it right. –  epascarello Jun 4 '13 at 5:00
    
Also use a swicth or an object, there is no need for all of the else ifs. –  epascarello Jun 4 '13 at 5:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

After going through some comments, some initial notes. I guess you miss some foundation about Javascript workings:

  1. Player is a function, and that's a good starting point. But you then try to access a member of it. This is possible only after you instantiate a new object from the function, using it as a constructor:

    var player = new Player(card_value);
    player.pcard1; // this is the public member of a Player instance
    
  2. Deal function should either return a value, or follow the aforementioned guideline;

  3. It's unclear (although both are correct) why you use the "function FunctionName" and then "var FunctionName = function" approach.

That said, you can skip completely the long if/else block, substituting it with a more structured approach:

var Ace = 1;
var Face = 10;
var symbols = [Ace, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Face, Face, Face];
var deal = function() {
    var card = Math.random() * 51;
    return symbols[Math.floor(card % 12)];
}

var Player = function(card_value) {
    this.card = card_value;
}

var card_value = deal();
var player = new Player(card_value);
alert(player.card);

You can then assign a new card to the player with a simple:

player.card = deal();

And remember that you can attach any member you like to player:

player.name = "Rambo";
share|improve this answer
    
When I use "function Player" I am creating an object using constructor notation. You can read about it here, w3schools.com/js/js_objects.asp under Using an Object Constructor. –  user2449973 Jun 4 '13 at 6:49
    
Actually, what I posted is constructor notation. Follow the example you posted (it's completed by the following part, "Creating JavaScript Object Instances"). See how it is used here (taken from your link): w3schools.com/js/tryit.asp?filename=tryjs_create_object2 –  sixFingers Jun 4 '13 at 6:52
    
Thanks for explaining that to me, but if what you said is true why doesn't this work? jsfiddle.net/da5Tf/2 –  user2449973 Jun 4 '13 at 7:03
    
@user2449973 you are using Player = new Object(pcard1); Player.pcard1 = pcard1; but no where you have declared pcard1 and initialized them before invoking them.... pcard1 and Player.pcard1 are not same in this context –  pinkpanther Jun 4 '13 at 7:06
    
But I'm declaring pcard 1 in that second "Player.pcard2 = pcard1;" –  user2449973 Jun 4 '13 at 7:09

By passing Player.pcard1 you will only pass the current value of the variable to bob parameter, whatever you do on bob doesn't apply on Player.pcard1.

You should either write different functions for different parameters.

//Creates the player as an object
function Player(pcard1) {
    Player.pcard1 = pcard1;
}
//Deals a random card out of the deck
var deal = function () {
    Player.pcard1 = deck;
};
var deal2=function(){
    Player.id="hello";   
}
deal();
deal2();
alert(Player.pcard1);
alert(Player.id);

(or)

Write functions returning values:

function getDeckValue(){
        return deck;
 }
 function getID(){
        return "1234";
  }
 Player.pcard1=getDeckValue();
 Player.id=getID();

(Or)

Use much flexible concepts of javascrit pointed out by @sixFingers, define a class instantiate it write member functions etc. In this way you can just access like Player.variable etc..

Excellent tutrial (I mean it) on javascript by jquery developer: Advanced Javascript . It touches all oop concepts you want and discusses many features of javascript which you cannot find on w3schools.

EDIT: Working code of second example

    //Creates the deck
var deck = Math.ceil(Math.random() * 52) + 1;
var Ace = 1;
var Face = 10;
if (deck % 13 == 1) {
    deck = Ace;
} else if (deck % 13 === 11 || deck % 13 === 12 || deck % 13 === 0) {
    deck = Face;
} else if (deck % 13 === 2) {
    deck = 2;
} else if (deck % 13 === 3) {
    deck = 3;
} else if (deck % 13 === 4) {
    deck = 4;
} else if (deck % 13 === 5) {
    deck = 5;
} else if (deck % 13 === 6) {
    deck = 6;
} else if (deck % 13 === 7) {
    deck = 7;
} else if (deck % 13 === 8) {
    deck = 8;
} else if (deck % 13 === 9) {
    deck = 9;
} else {
    deck = 10;
}
//Creates the player as an object
function Player(pcard1){
   Player.pcard1=pcard1;   
}
function getDeckValue(){
        return deck;
 }
 function getID(){
        return "1234";
  }
 Player.pcard1=getDeckValue();
 Player.id=getID();

alert(Player.pcard1);
alert(Player.id);
share|improve this answer
    
Your first example kind of defeats the purpose of declaring a function if you have to keep making new functions don't you think? And your second example doesn't assign any values to anything at all. –  user2449973 Jun 4 '13 at 7:06
    
@user2449973 they are useful if they are wrapped in a class and you want to do some caluclations before acutally asigning them.... I have only shown that you can do this way.....but did you try my second example....it's working I will edit to post full code –  pinkpanther Jun 4 '13 at 7:12
    
What's the point of the whole getID function? –  user2449973 Jun 4 '13 at 7:20
    
@user2449973 you have asked to initialize different properties of Player but you did it wrongly in your code so I just gave it as an example that's it...you may do this for whatever properties you want....and you otherwise why not just do Player.pcard1=deck and Player.someotherproperty=someotherassign.... it works –  pinkpanther Jun 4 '13 at 7:23

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