Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a tree that looks like this, reflected via polymorphic inheritance:

      A
  /   |   \
  B   C   D

That works great, like:

class BaseModel(db.Model):     # Table A in diagram
    __tablename__ = "entities"

    id = db.Column(db.BigInteger, primary_key=True, nullable=False, server_default=func.nextval('guid_seq'))
    type_id = db.Column(db.SmallInteger, db.ForeignKey(EntityTypesModel.id))

    __mapper_args__ = {
        'polymorphic_identity':'entity',
        'polymorphic_on':type_id,
        'with_polymorphic':'*'
    }

class BrandModel(BaseModel):   # Table B, C, D in diagram
    __tablename__ = 'brands'

    id = db.Column(db.BigInteger, db.ForeignKey(StufffModel.id), primary_key=True, nullable=False)
    name = db.Column(db.String, nullable=False)

    __mapper_args__ = {
        'polymorphic_identity':ET_BRAND,
    }

The problem is I need to reflect something more like this:

              A
          /   |   \
          B   C   D
                /   \
                E    F

Where D is not only a polymorphic child of A but also the polymorphic parents of E & F.

It seems like I have to choose, D can either be a polymorphic child or it can be a parent - it can't be both.

Do I have any options here?

EDIT:

Just to tie this off, I ended up flattening the tree so it looks like:

      A
  /   |   \   \
 B    C    E   F

D is now gone and the functionality it provided is in the children (E & F). I'll probably make the common parts a mixin or something.

Unfortunate but I couldn't spend more time on this particular issue.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You definitely can do this. The code below is using the declarative_base, but shows the model setup which works. D class is both a parent and a child using class inheritance. However, the polymorphic_identity is stored only on the top level. Make sure you have all proper foreign keys and class inheritances set up.

*Note: you example defines type_id as Numeric, however the values seem to be Strings.*

Base = declarative_base(cls=_BaseMixin)
Base.query = session.query_property()

class BaseModel(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'entities'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    #type_id = Column(Integer, nullable=False)
    type_id = Column(String, nullable=False)
    __mapper_args__ = {
        'polymorphic_identity': 'entity',
        'polymorphic_on':type_id,
        'with_polymorphic':'*'
    }

class ModelB(BaseModel):
    __tablename__ = 'modelB'
    __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'modelB'}
    id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('entities.id'), primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String, nullable=False)

class ModelC(BaseModel):
    __tablename__ = 'modelC'
    __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'modelC'}
    id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('entities.id'), primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String, nullable=False)

class ModelD(BaseModel):
    __tablename__ = 'modelD'
    __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'modelD'}
    id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('entities.id'), primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String, nullable=False)

class ModelE(ModelD):
    __tablename__ = 'modelE'
    __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'modelE'}
    id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('entities.id'), ForeignKey('modelD.id'), primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String, nullable=False)

class ModelF(ModelD):
    __tablename__ = 'modelF'
    __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'modelF'}
    id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('entities.id'), ForeignKey('modelD.id'), primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String, nullable=False)
share|improve this answer
    
So this looks like it is piggy backing off of the discriminator column type_id on ModelA. In reality Models D E F are discriminated by another column - maybe call it type_inner_id. However ModelD must remain polymorphic in relation to ModelA on the type_id column. –  amirpc Jun 4 '13 at 13:15
    
I believe this is the way that makes sense, and definitely would not call it piggy backing. Great you found a solution which is acceptable for you though. –  van Jun 5 '13 at 10:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.