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Is it possible in Groovy to determine in a method what is the expected result?

Effectively, this means overloading by return type.

Motivation: DB query method which may or may not return exactly 1, or 0..* results. If 1, then it would throw; if 0..*, it would simply return a collection.

So I'd like to have just one query(...) which would return List<Foo> or Foo in these cases:

List<Foo> foos = query("FROM Foo");
Foo foo        = query("FROM Foo f WHERE f.id = 1");

query pseudocode would be:

Object query( String q ){
    if( Collection.class.isAssignableFrom( GET_CURRENT_METHODS_RETURN_TYPE ) ){
         return new LinkedList(){ ... }
    }
    if( Foo.class == GET_CURRENT_METHODS_RETURN_TYPE ) ){
         return new Foo(); // TODO
    }
}

Bonus question: Does some language support this?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Method return overload means writing the same method with different return types. The JVM allows it, although Java doesn't. Groovy does, but it won't resolve correctly which method will be called. There are some languages which support this, like C++, Haskell, Perl and Ada.

As for what you want, yes, just return whatever the method should return and put def as the return type of the method. If you don't want a def return type, you need a supertype of both List<Foo> and Foo (which can be inferred by the compiler when you use CompileStatic/TypeChecked).

And for the caller, the old instanceof (or switch-case) do the trick:

class Foo{}

class Database {
  def query(String query) {
    if (query.contains(".id")) { // here you will make a call to database
      new Foo()
    } else {
      []
    }
  }
}

db = new Database()
assert db.query("from Foo f where f.id = 3") instanceof Foo
assert db.query("from Foo f") instanceof List

Update:

The compiler will infer a common super type as a return type. If it's not something which has the methods you are trying to use, you'll have to "fork" according to it. There is an extension which can do pattern matching, if you are not into ifs:

import groovy.transform.CompileStatic

@CompileStatic
class Cases {
  static main(args) {
    def returned = new Cases().query 10
    //returned[1] // doesn't work: returned is of the common type 
                  // OBJECT, which has no getAt method

    returned.case {
      when String then { println it } // will print "a string"
      when List then { List l -> println l.head() } // compiles fine, won't be executed
    }
  }

  def query(obj) {
    if (obj == 10) {
      "a string"
    } else {
      [1, 2, 3]
    }
  }
}

HERE is where Groovy inference shines:

import groovy.transform.CompileStatic

@CompileStatic
class Cases {
  static main(args) {
    assert new Cases().foo().baz == "w00t"
  }

  def foo() {
    new Foo(baz: "w00t")
  }
}

class Foo { String baz }

You write def foo() and it KNOWS the method will return a Foo object. Beautiful.


If there is a common super class among the possible implementations, it will be chosen:

import groovy.transform.CompileStatic

@CompileStatic
class Cases {
  static main(args) {
    def bat = new Cases().animal 1
    assert bat.name == "bat"
    assert bat.favoriteBloodType == "A+" // Won't compile with error 
                                         // "No such property: favoriteBloodType
                                         // for class: Animal"
  }

  def animal(int animalCode) {
    if (animalCode == 1) {
      new Bat(name: "bat", favoriteBloodType: "A+")
    } else {
      new Chicken(name: "chicken", weight: 3.4)
    }
  }
}

abstract class Animal {
  String name
}

class Bat extends Animal {
  String favoriteBloodType
}

class Chicken extends Animal {
  BigDecimal weight
}

In your case the compiler will infer the common super type of both Foo and List: Object.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like the answer... However, what I really meant was not overloading (calling different method), not returning different types, but determining what is the expected type, i.e. what type is "on the left side of the assignment" in the calling method. The compiler knows it, so theoretically, there could be a way. –  Ondra Žižka Jun 9 '13 at 20:42
    
I updated my answer adding the "infer the common super type" part. Warn me if that doesn't help. –  Will P Jun 9 '13 at 23:15

I am not sure if this exactly what you are looking for, but see if it helps:

class T {}

def func(t) {
    List <T> a = [new T(), new T()]
    T b = new T()

    if (t > 1) return (List <T>)a
    if (t == 1) return (T)b
}

assert func(1) instanceof T
assert func(2) instanceof List<T>
share|improve this answer
    
That's just moving the "Multi" to a param. Not really what I seek. –  Ondra Žižka Jun 4 '13 at 17:26
    
Can you give a mock up of how you are going to use this ability? Assuming it is available. –  vladtax Jun 4 '13 at 19:10

Groovy allows you to declare a variable without the type, using the def keyword. So you can write either:

def foo = query("FROM Foo"); // "foo" will contain a List<Foo>

or:

def foo = query("FROM Foo f WHERE f.id = 1"); // "foo" will contain a Foo object

That said, is up to you to make it work the proper way. To do that the easy way, I would suggest you to return always a collection, which may contain only one item.

As a rule of thumb, if you expect different return types, you probably need two different behaviours to deal with them, so it's fine to have two methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but I don't like differentiating methods using something like "...Multi" or "...Single". Hence the question. –  Ondra Žižka Jun 4 '13 at 14:16
    
@OndraŽižka If the question is "Can groovy store in a variable different objects at runtime?" the answer is yes, using the def keyword. If you want to check the type returned from a method, you can also do that (see [stackoverflow.com/questions/2060427/…). Does this answer your question? –  lucke84 Jun 4 '13 at 16:26
    
The question is whether I can determine it within the method. Changed the title to stress that aspect. –  Ondra Žižka Jun 4 '13 at 17:18
    
Sorry, maybe it's just me but I cannot see what you're expecting to do. First of all, which is the "method" you're talking about? And why do you want to assert the returned type of a method inside it? Can you please edit your question to add an example of the code you would like to be able to write? –  lucke84 Jun 4 '13 at 22:03

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