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In a situation with multiple 'request threads' and one dumb 'worker thread', the request threads must queue.

Consider two possibilities:

  1. Each request thread calls Monitor.Wait on its own dedicated object, which goes in a FIFO Queue. When a result arrives, the oldest object is pulsed.

  2. All request threads take a number and call Monitor.Wait on a shared object. When a result arrives, Monitor.PulseAll is called on the shared object, and all request threads check to see if their number is up.

There may be other options, but please ignore them for the purposes of this question.

Question - When there are lots of queuing threads:

  • Is either method significantly more CPU efficient?
  • Is either method significantly more Memory efficient?

The lock objects are just 'new object()' instances.

My gut feeling is scenario 1 is more efficient, since only one thread will act when a pulse happens, and base object instances are very resource-light (right?). However, I do not understand the mechanics of Wait very well. Perhaps there are more resources required if more objects are being 'monitored'?

Thanks in advance for your insights.


I have written code below to illustrate the two scenarios.

Further explanation:

In my situation, the 'worker' thread accepts work and produces results asychronously. It does not know which request results belong to, except that the results are always produced in the same order in which the requests were received.

Although I do have an application for this, this question should be treated as academic. Please do not waste your time questioning the underlying assumptions or suggesting alternative solutions. However, questions to clarify the intent of the question are welcome.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;

namespace praccmd.threads
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            TestResets();

            Console.WriteLine("press key");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }


        private static void TestResets()
        {
            //lock object per work request
            Console.WriteLine("----lock object per work request----");

            for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++)
            {
                Thread t = new Thread(ThreadLockObjPerRequest);
                t.Name = "Thread_object_per_request_" + i;
                t.Start();
            }

            //now pretend to be the WorkDone event
            while (_ticketQueue.Count > 0)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(50);
                lock (_receiveLock)
                {
                    var doneTicketNext = _ticketQueue.Dequeue();
                    lock (doneTicketNext)
                    {
                        Monitor.Pulse(doneTicketNext);
                        Monitor.Wait(doneTicketNext);
                    }
                }
            }

            //shared lock object (pulseall), one id per request
            Console.WriteLine("----shared lock object----");

            for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++)
            {
                Thread t = new Thread(ThreadSharedLock);
                t.Name = "Thread_shared_lock_object_" + i;
                t.Start();
            }

            //now pretend to be the WorkDone event
            while (_ticketNumberQueue.Count > 0)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(50);
                lock (_sharedReceiveLock)
                {
                    lock (_sharedLock)
                    {
                        _sharedLock.TicketNumber = _ticketNumberQueue.Dequeue();
                        Monitor.PulseAll(_sharedLock);
                    }
                    lock (_sharedThanksLock) Monitor.Wait(_sharedThanksLock);
                }
            }
        }


        //infrastructure for lock-object-per-request
        private static readonly object _sendLock = new object();
        private static readonly object _receiveLock = new object();
        private static readonly Queue<object> _ticketQueue = new Queue<object>();

        private static object TakeATicket()
        {
            var ticket = new object();
            _ticketQueue.Enqueue(ticket);
            return ticket;
        }

        //lock-object-per-request thread
        private static void ThreadLockObjPerRequest()
        {
            var name = Thread.CurrentThread.Name;

            object ticket;
            lock (_sendLock)
            {
                ticket = TakeATicket();
                //RequestWorkNonBlocking("some data specific to this request");
                Console.WriteLine(name + " sends its request.");
            }

            var myResult = string.Empty;
            lock (ticket)
            {
                Monitor.Wait(ticket);
                //myResult = GetResultFromAStaticVariable();
                Console.WriteLine(name + " gets its data.");
                Monitor.Pulse(ticket);
            }

            //do something with myResult
        }


        //infrastructure for shared-lock
        private class SharedLock { public int TicketNumber { get; set; } }

        private static readonly SharedLock _sharedLock = new SharedLock { TicketNumber = 0 };
        private static readonly dynamic _sharedReceiveLock = new object();
        private static readonly dynamic _sharedThanksLock = new object();
        private static readonly object _ticketIncrementLock = new object();
        private static int _ticketNumber = 0;
        private static readonly Queue<int> _ticketNumberQueue = new Queue<int>();

        private static int TakeATicketNumber()
        {
            lock (_ticketIncrementLock)
            {
                _ticketNumberQueue.Enqueue(++_ticketNumber);
                return _ticketNumber;
            }
        }

        //thread for shared-lock
        private static void ThreadSharedLock()
        {
            var name = Thread.CurrentThread.Name;

            int ticketNumber;
            lock (_sendLock)
            {
                ticketNumber = TakeATicketNumber();
                //RequestWorkNonBlocking("some data specific to this request");
                Console.WriteLine(name + " sends its request.");
            }

            var myResult = string.Empty;
            do
            {
                lock (_sharedLock)
                {
                    Monitor.Wait(_sharedLock);
                    if (_sharedLock.TicketNumber == ticketNumber)
                    {
                        myResult = "response"; //GetResultFromAStaticVariable();
                        Console.WriteLine(name + " gets its data.");
                    }
                }
            } while (myResult.Length == 0);

            lock (_sharedThanksLock) Monitor.Pulse(_sharedThanksLock);

            //do something with myResult
        }

    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Performance is always tricky, and will depend a lot on your specific context; you would probably have to measure it to get a good answer for that, noting that it probably depends on the number of expected outstanding tasks, etc.

The way I work this multiplexer scenario is using the Task API; a new incoming request creates a TaskCompletionSource<T> is created an enqueued (synchronized) into a queue, i.e. let's say each result (when it arrives later) is an int:

private readonly Queue<TaskCompletionSource<int>> queue
            = new Queue<TaskCompletionSource<int>>();

public Task<int> MakeRequest(...) {
    var source = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();
    lock(queue) {
        queue.Enqueue(source);
    }
    return source.Task;
}

and then the worker, as results come in, can do something like:

private void SetNextResult(int value) {
    TaskCompletionSource<int> source;
    lock(queue) {
        source = queue.Dequeue();
    }
    source.SetResult(value);
}

The nice things about this is that it allows each individual caller to decide how they want to respond to the delayed work:

  • they can use .Wait / .Result to block
  • they can use .ContinueWith to add a callback
  • they can use await to use a state-machine-based continuation
share|improve this answer
    
Not really answering the question, but good stuff. +1 –  Jordan Morris Jun 4 '13 at 9:11
    
@Saber as I tried to emphasize in the first line: which is more efficient will depend on a lot of factors; througput, number of outstanding work items, number of threads, number of cores, etc –  Marc Gravell Jun 4 '13 at 12:02
    
I guess the kind of answer I am looking for would offer suggestions as to how the key factors (probably just number of threads, really), would interact with the internals. We can assume one request per thread. –  Jordan Morris Jun 6 '13 at 8:14

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